Date   

Re: Legal source for UK Internments

Kay Sharpe
 

Hi
I have documents showing details of my mum who was interned and her sister who wasn't obtained from Bad Arolsen https://arolsen-archives.org/en/ 
Although I cannot suggest a legal reason for internment I understand that everyone who was to be interned was arrested around May 1940 due to an outcry in the British press about working alongside foreign spies. My poor, innocent,  quiet mum was put in Holloway until they were able to move her to the Isle of Mann. Having said that she was looked after and fed well and had freedom within the town. Sorry I cannot help more.  


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Chuck Weinstein
 

Just to add my two kopecks to this discussion, JewishGen is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose rules prevent it from lobbying or taking a political position.  The resources from JewishGen are freely available to all with donors receiving some extra perks in search aids.  Litvak SIG is a separate organization, but their databases are also freely available via JewishGen.  Their donors get advance abilities to search recent additions to their databases.  There is nothing hidden behind paywalls through either organization.  That is irrelevant to the discussion of federal cost increases that will effectively eliminate taxpayer funded material from public view.  USCIS is a government agency which holds files that are very useful for genealogical purposes and help family historians break though many brick walls.  Their genealogy service has provided much useful information, but the proposed costs will significantly cut down usage of the service, which, based on experience, will lead to it being eliminated in the future.  That seems to be part of the plan.  Conflating government services provided at a profit to the US Government with services provided by a non-profit organization that depends on donations to survive is neither useful nor correct.  It is up to you as to whether or not you wish to comment to the government about the proposed increases in costs, but you are way off base in criticizing JewishGen and other non profits for asking people to donate a small amount for immediate or easier access to data that is otherwise freely available.  I am neither a spokesperson nor an officer of JewishGen, Inc., just a researcher who is a donor, but appreciates the services provided over the years in helping me with my family history.

Chuck Weinstein
Bellport, NY
chuck1@...


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Marion Werle
 

Bob,

Genealogy is not free - acquisition, translation and compilation of record sets incurs costs. Writing directly to an Archives incurs costs. Ordering records from an agency incurs costs. JewishGen doesn't charge for services, and is staffed mainly with volunteers, but incurs costs for permanent staff and server infrastructure (housed at Ancestry),  among other things. FamilySearch is supported by the LDS Church. Ancestry and MyHeritage are subscription websites, but can be accessed for free in many libraries. Not every resource that a genealogist needs is free or supported by a foundation. Professional genealogists charge for their time because it's how they make their living and they incur costs as well. 

Not all LitvakSIG research groups are actively translating records at this point, since known records may already have been translated and are publically available for free. When you access these records, you are reaping the benefits of previous contributors. And 18 months goes by quickly, even if you aren't a subscriber. 

As for USCIS, the proposed fee increases far exceed what is reasonable for a government agency.

Marion Werle
<werleme@...>
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Bob Bloomberg
 

Marion,

I agree.  It does not remotely compare to the USCIS costs.

But my point is that Litvack records are NOT free.  You have to pay $100 or wait 18 months to get new records. That is NOT free.  

Yes, a lot of time and effort have gone in to compiling and digitizing these records.  The same can be said for the Internet Archive, the Hathi Trust, the Library of Congress, Harvard University and endless other repositories of records.  They are supported by donations, legacies, etc.  That way everybody gets equal access, and no one is left out because they can't afford $100.

On Mon, Nov 25, 2019 at 12:01 PM Marion Werle <werleme@...> wrote:
Bob,

LitvakSIG membership in a District Research Group (DRG) is a multiyear membership (5 years) which supports the translation and acquisition costs of Lithuanian Jewish records. It makes the records available to DRG members via spreadsheets as soon as they are translated and compiled. After 18 months, they are made available free to everybody on the LitvakSIG website and on JewishGen, so there is a huge number of records freely available, since the SIG has been in existence for 25 years.

This doesn't even remotely compare to the proposed USCIS per record search and individual file charges which far exceed that of a 5-year DRG membership.

Marion Werle
<werleme@...>
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Marion Werle
 

Bob,

LitvakSIG membership in a District Research Group (DRG) is a multiyear membership (5 years) which supports the translation and acquisition costs of Lithuanian Jewish records. It makes the records available to DRG members via spreadsheets as soon as they are translated and compiled. After 18 months, they are made available free to everybody on the LitvakSIG website and on JewishGen, so there is a huge number of records freely available, since the SIG has been in existence for 25 years.

This doesn't even remotely compare to the proposed USCIS per record search and individual file charges which far exceed that of a 5-year DRG membership.

Marion Werle
<werleme@...>
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

amy wachs
 

Bob Bloomberg complained about genealogists' concern about the pending price increase of USCIS records by wrongly asserting that LitvakSIG charges $100 to get records.  LitvakSIG is a non-profit organization staffed entirely by volunteers.  We have been engaged for more than 20 years in the very costly and time-consuming mission of finding and translating surviving Jewish records in Lithuanian archives.  We have translated more than a million records, and have made them available to the public at no charge on LitvakSIG's All Lithuania Database.  The All Lithuania Database is freely-searchable via JewishGen or LitvakSIG's website.  The process of translating archival records is expensive, and LitvakSIG engages in fund-raising to be able to fund this important work.   We value and appreciate our donors.  Qualified contributors of $100 to a specific LitvakSIG project receive certain benefits, including early access to newly translated records before they are added to the freely-searchable All Lithuania Database.  
Amy Wachs


Re: Grave at Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn

info@...
 

Jacob, Is it possible to please see if you have pictures for the following graves at Washington Cemetery?
Thank you so much. My email is hallo13@...

Tamara

John Schwartz - Cemetery 5, post 474, row 8, grave 4

Frieda Schwartz - Cem 2, post 235, row 4, gr 3

Meyer Schwartz - cem 1, post 80, row 2, gr 2

Meyer Schwartz - cem 2, post 235, row 1, gr 6


Box Tax Payer Rolls #lithuania

Chuck Winik <cwinik65@...>
 

Hello,

I was told my family's names were listed on the Box Tax Payers Rolls of
1877. Can someone tell me how I can get access to this database?

Best Regards

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you search the LitvakSIG All Lithuania Database
(www.litvaksig.org) for your surname, you will find the information
in the search results under Tax and Voters Lists.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Box Tax Payer Rolls #lithuania

Chuck Winik <cwinik65@...>
 

Hello,

I was told my family's names were listed on the Box Tax Payers Rolls of
1877. Can someone tell me how I can get access to this database?

Best Regards

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If you search the LitvakSIG All Lithuania Database
(www.litvaksig.org) for your surname, you will find the information
in the search results under Tax and Voters Lists.


Rivka Barbasch #poland

Milton Koch
 

My PGM- Feige- family was Barbasch >from Pidvolochysk, Poland (now
Ukraine).
I have found many siblings of her in both JRI-PL and Gesher Galicia.
However, I have just come upon RIVKA in several documents-her marriage
to Mendel Wolf Weitman in 1928, as well as two pages of testimony >from
Yad Vashem. She supposedly was born in 1877. She apparently perished in
1942 in the Shoah-no records of this found either.
One POT is by her nephew, Mordechai Barbasch, written in 1957. The other
is by her brother, Yisrael, written in 1955.
I have not been able to confirm anything about her at all.
I scoured many genealogy sites to no avail.
I am trying to contact anyone of her relatives to see if there are
documents to confirm her birth and death, in order to fill in mysterious
gap in my grandmother's sibship, as well as whether she had
children, who would be my cousins!
Is it possible that births may NOT have been entered in official records
at all??
Thank you.
Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD, USA
BARBASCH-Pidvolochysk


JRI Poland #Poland Rivka Barbasch #poland

Milton Koch
 

My PGM- Feige- family was Barbasch >from Pidvolochysk, Poland (now
Ukraine).
I have found many siblings of her in both JRI-PL and Gesher Galicia.
However, I have just come upon RIVKA in several documents-her marriage
to Mendel Wolf Weitman in 1928, as well as two pages of testimony >from
Yad Vashem. She supposedly was born in 1877. She apparently perished in
1942 in the Shoah-no records of this found either.
One POT is by her nephew, Mordechai Barbasch, written in 1957. The other
is by her brother, Yisrael, written in 1955.
I have not been able to confirm anything about her at all.
I scoured many genealogy sites to no avail.
I am trying to contact anyone of her relatives to see if there are
documents to confirm her birth and death, in order to fill in mysterious
gap in my grandmother's sibship, as well as whether she had
children, who would be my cousins!
Is it possible that births may NOT have been entered in official records
at all??
Thank you.
Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD, USA
BARBASCH-Pidvolochysk


Re: Legal source for UK Internments

Tony Hausner
 

Just remembered that a group was created a few years ago, but never really became active. I will see about doing that.  I will post more about that later.  In the meantime, here is some info that I just shared with that group. Please email me at thausner@... if interested in joining that group or send an email to interned-on-iom@... and ask to join.  

For what its worth, my parents left Vienna shortly after the anschluss.  They met in London, married and in 1939 were interned for a year in separate camps on the Isle of Man.  My father in Mooragh and my mother in Balmoral.  My mother kept my father's letter and I have donated copies to the Manx Museum as well as the USHMM and Yad Vashem.  
 
Here are photos of some of the letters at the USHMM
 
Here are my photos from the trip that we made to the Isle of Man in 2016.  
 
There is duplication between these albums
 
 
Here is their material on the WWII internment camps
 
The Manx Museum had a very moving exhibit on the camps when we visited in 2016 but do not know if still there.  A book "Living with the Wire" Edited by Yvonne Cresswell who was also the staff coordinator of the exhibit.  The book is available on Amazon.  


Re: Technical questions about new additions to Belarus database #belarus

Paul mz
 

Different transliteration rules may have been used in different record
sets so one can't say definitively whether different English spellings
reflect different Russian spellings. I am trying to review older data
to bring some uniformity to the transliteration of names but it is a
slow tedious process. Almost all of the newly uploaded data does use
the same transliteration rules so it is likely that a difference in
the English spelling does reflect a difference in the original Russian
spelling. But I would be careful putting too much importance on the
exact spelling of names. There are numerous examples where a person's
Russian name was spelled differently in two different record sets. To
account for variations in spellings it is always recommended to search
for names using the "phonetically like" match options in the JewishGen
search engines to ensure that variations in spellings will come up in
the search results.

There is another issue with the 1874 Borisov revision lists that may
also explain the change in search results: in the original uploaded
data the fathers of the people recorded were listed as separate
household members even though those fathers were not separate entries
in the original record. Those fathers certainly existed but they
should not have been listed as separate entries in the database. In
this latest upload those extra entries have been removed and that may
explain the fewer search results.

Paul Zoglin
JewishGen Belarus Research Division


Matthew Klionsky's original message:

I've taken a starting look at this new data. Fortunately for me, there's
LOTS of new Revision List records involving names of my personal family
interest. I'm working to interpret the new data and integrate it with
prior info in my files, and I find myself with an immediate observation
of differences >from previously available information that probably results

from technical changes in how the new records were created, so I'm hoping
someone involved with translation/transliteration of the records can provided

a little insight..

I'll frame the question with respect to my KLIONSKY surname.ears ago,
when I first did a phonetic search for that name in the JGen Belarus
database, there were 'hits' for the 1874 Borisov Revision List, all pertaining
to households with a KLIONSKI spelling, and there was only one hit for any
Revision List (Minsk 1858; this used a KLONSKII spelling). Of the
additional Revision List hits pulled >from the newly added records with
a similar phonetic search, there's one hit >from 1850, 3 >from 1894, and the
rest >from 1858. Among them, these new hits use the following spellings:
KLIONSKIY, KLYONSKIY, KLEONSKIY, KLENSKIY and KLENSKY - and NONE of the
new hits used the KLIONSKI spelling used for ALL the previous 1874 hits.
Yet, it seems pretty clear that some of the people who appear on the 1874

lists are identical to those >from earlier and later lists. My question is,

do these spelling variants result >from application of some standard, fixed

transliteration rules, suggesting that households with different
transliterated latin-alphabet spellings also had different original cyrillic

spellings? Or, might all these spellings represent the same cyrillic
-spelled name, just transliterated differently into latin letters for
different lists, or in different transcription batches?

Matthew Klionsky
Chicago


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Technical questions about new additions to Belarus database #belarus

Paul mz
 

Different transliteration rules may have been used in different record
sets so one can't say definitively whether different English spellings
reflect different Russian spellings. I am trying to review older data
to bring some uniformity to the transliteration of names but it is a
slow tedious process. Almost all of the newly uploaded data does use
the same transliteration rules so it is likely that a difference in
the English spelling does reflect a difference in the original Russian
spelling. But I would be careful putting too much importance on the
exact spelling of names. There are numerous examples where a person's
Russian name was spelled differently in two different record sets. To
account for variations in spellings it is always recommended to search
for names using the "phonetically like" match options in the JewishGen
search engines to ensure that variations in spellings will come up in
the search results.

There is another issue with the 1874 Borisov revision lists that may
also explain the change in search results: in the original uploaded
data the fathers of the people recorded were listed as separate
household members even though those fathers were not separate entries
in the original record. Those fathers certainly existed but they
should not have been listed as separate entries in the database. In
this latest upload those extra entries have been removed and that may
explain the fewer search results.

Paul Zoglin
JewishGen Belarus Research Division


Matthew Klionsky's original message:

I've taken a starting look at this new data. Fortunately for me, there's
LOTS of new Revision List records involving names of my personal family
interest. I'm working to interpret the new data and integrate it with
prior info in my files, and I find myself with an immediate observation
of differences >from previously available information that probably results

from technical changes in how the new records were created, so I'm hoping
someone involved with translation/transliteration of the records can provided

a little insight..

I'll frame the question with respect to my KLIONSKY surname.ears ago,
when I first did a phonetic search for that name in the JGen Belarus
database, there were 'hits' for the 1874 Borisov Revision List, all pertaining
to households with a KLIONSKI spelling, and there was only one hit for any
Revision List (Minsk 1858; this used a KLONSKII spelling). Of the
additional Revision List hits pulled >from the newly added records with
a similar phonetic search, there's one hit >from 1850, 3 >from 1894, and the
rest >from 1858. Among them, these new hits use the following spellings:
KLIONSKIY, KLYONSKIY, KLEONSKIY, KLENSKIY and KLENSKY - and NONE of the
new hits used the KLIONSKI spelling used for ALL the previous 1874 hits.
Yet, it seems pretty clear that some of the people who appear on the 1874

lists are identical to those >from earlier and later lists. My question is,

do these spelling variants result >from application of some standard, fixed

transliteration rules, suggesting that households with different
transliterated latin-alphabet spellings also had different original cyrillic

spellings? Or, might all these spellings represent the same cyrillic
-spelled name, just transliterated differently into latin letters for
different lists, or in different transcription batches?

Matthew Klionsky
Chicago


legal changed names - general

Trudy Barch
 

Our ancestors that immigrated to America, 1900-1920, came with their European name.   The spouse had the European spelling of the name as well as the children.   When husband/father naturalized and legally changed his name…  1) did his wife and children automatically became naturalized citizens?  2) did the wife and children’s spelling of the name legally change at that time also?  3) The American born children - would they use the European spellings until dad naturalized?   

Thank you,   Trudy Barch (FL)

 

 


Male first name Babel

hekenvin@...
 

In researching my husband's family, I have found a male relative who was called "Uncle Babel."  He lived in the Russian Empire (probably Kiev) in the 19th to early 20th centuries and in Kremenchug, Ukraine in the 1920s. 

I've never heard of the name Babel before. Is it a recognized kinui (nickname) for something else?  Does anyone know what Babel's Hebrew name might be (i.e. could it be something other than Babel or Bavel)? 

I am aware of the possible relationship of the name to the tower of Babel mentioned in Genesis,  the city/state of Bavel (Babylonia), and the Yiddish writer surnamed Babel.  I also have read the Abarim Publications site about the name, at  http://www.abarim-publications.com/Meaning/Babel.html#.Xdvd65NKipo  which suggests that the name Babel could be related to Abel, Abel-beth-maacah, Abel-keramim, Abel-maim, Abel-meholah, Abel-mizraim, Abel-shittim, Abilene, Bul, Ibleam, Jabal, Jubal, Jubilee, Obil, Tubal, Tubal-cain, Zerubbabel.   
If you have a man in your family whose first-name was Babel, by what other names was he known?

With thanks,
Helene Kenvin


using DNA to establish Jewish ancestry #sephardic

Patricia <patricia77@...>
 

Good morning,
I took a DNA test through Family Tree DNA, MTDNA to be exact, and
discovered that I was of Sephardic Jewish heritage. I brought my information
to a well-known Rabbi in Pennsylvania who wrote a letter for me, but this
was denied by Nefesh B'Nefesh for Aliyah. Apparently Israel does not accept
this type of testing as legitment proof even though they use DNA to
establish the Kohanim line. Could you please clarify the difference. I want
to claim my heritage, but have faced many obstacles along the way. I am
currently a subscriber to your newsletter and have read numerous articles,
and have even sought out a Jewish Genealogist who, at that time, was not a
significant help; and now, I am no further along than I was ten years ago as
all of my family are deceased with the exception of a younger sibling who
claims to have known this all of his life. Any advice or guidance you could
give would be greatly appreciated.
Respectfully,
Patricia Landry


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim using DNA to establish Jewish ancestry #sephardic

Patricia <patricia77@...>
 

Good morning,
I took a DNA test through Family Tree DNA, MTDNA to be exact, and
discovered that I was of Sephardic Jewish heritage. I brought my information
to a well-known Rabbi in Pennsylvania who wrote a letter for me, but this
was denied by Nefesh B'Nefesh for Aliyah. Apparently Israel does not accept
this type of testing as legitment proof even though they use DNA to
establish the Kohanim line. Could you please clarify the difference. I want
to claim my heritage, but have faced many obstacles along the way. I am
currently a subscriber to your newsletter and have read numerous articles,
and have even sought out a Jewish Genealogist who, at that time, was not a
significant help; and now, I am no further along than I was ten years ago as
all of my family are deceased with the exception of a younger sibling who
claims to have known this all of his life. Any advice or guidance you could
give would be greatly appreciated.
Respectfully,
Patricia Landry


Re: How to prove family story about article in the Jewish forward newspaper

Mark Shapiro
 

Try sending your query to the Forward's archivist Chana Pollack at https://forward.com/contact/.


gravestone pic from Montefiore Springfield Cemetery

Shoshana Kahan
 

If someone is going to the Montefiore Cemetery (Springfield Gardens, Queens), could they please photograph for me the following grave:
Interment #: 75065
Last Name: COOPER
First Name: CHARLES
Age: 85
Date of Death: 11/8/1951
Division:  
Block: 13
Row: 007L
Grave: 11
Section:  
Plot:


I am hoping that the gravestone will have his father's name on it.
Thanks in advance,
Shoshana