Date   

words for step-grandparents? #general

Deanna Levinsky
 

Hello all,
I am trying to locate the family of Max Kroop who married Anna (Annie)
Rifkin on June 28, 1910 in New York City, probably in Brooklyn. I am
also trying to locate the family of Robert Goldstein who married Annie
Rifkin on June 12, 1920, also in New York City, probably Brooklyn. It
appears that Annie, Max and Robert were all born in Russia. I have
copies of their marriage certificates but have not been able to trace
anything.
Is there a special (honorific) word (either Russian or Yiddish) that
would have been used in the early part of the 1900's when a child
speaks to the parents of her mother's husband?
All help greatly appreciated,
Deanna Mandel Levinsky
Long Island, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen words for step-grandparents? #general

Deanna Levinsky
 

Hello all,
I am trying to locate the family of Max Kroop who married Anna (Annie)
Rifkin on June 28, 1910 in New York City, probably in Brooklyn. I am
also trying to locate the family of Robert Goldstein who married Annie
Rifkin on June 12, 1920, also in New York City, probably Brooklyn. It
appears that Annie, Max and Robert were all born in Russia. I have
copies of their marriage certificates but have not been able to trace
anything.
Is there a special (honorific) word (either Russian or Yiddish) that
would have been used in the early part of the 1900's when a child
speaks to the parents of her mother's husband?
All help greatly appreciated,
Deanna Mandel Levinsky
Long Island, NY


Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois to host University of Chicago mathematician at Aug. 25, 2019, meeting #general

events@...
 

Amateur genealogist Zalman Usiskin will share "More Stories about Things
I've Learned >from Doing Genealogy" at the Sunday, Aug. 25, 2019, meeting
of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois at Temple Beth-El, 3610
Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill. His presentation starts at 2 p.m.

Sign-in, networking with others interested in Jewish genealogy, and
access to the 800-volume JGSI research library and genealogy help desk
staffed by family history mavens will be available starting at 12:30
p.m.

Usiskin has been interested in the genealogy of the various branches of
his family since he was a teenager. Over the years, he has compiled
family trees on three of his four grandparents with a total of more than
4,800 named relatives. On his paternal great-grandfather's line he has
names of more than 1,000 descendants of Usiskins all over the world but
has never been able to definitively verify that any are blood relatives.

Usiskin, born in Chicago, is an emeritus professor of mathematics
education at the University of Chicago. In his field, he has given talks
in all 50 states and 27 foreign countries and has been a major speaker
at national and international conferences. This will mark the fourth
time that he has spoken at a JGSI meeting. In 2002, he spoke about
writing and distributing a family tree book. In 2015, he described
three examples of how people arranged genealogical information into
coffee table books for distribution to relatives. Last December, he
delivered a presentation called "Stories about Things I've Learned >from
Doing Genealogy."

Usiskin is a fine storyteller, and JGSI immediately invited him back
when we heard that he had more stories to tell that offer research
lessons or hints that might help others doing genealogy.

In his new presentation, questions are raised and discussed: Who goes on
a family tree? To what extent are family stories "cleansed"? How did a
"black sheep" of the family turn out to be just the opposite? How did
some Jews survive World War II in Europe and how might they be found
even today? How did DNA help to find both biological parents of someone
who was adopted? And he will explain how his wife's heritage can be
traced back to Adam and Eve. (What? You are skeptical?) Come to this
event to hear his explanation.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois to host University of Chicago mathematician at Aug. 25, 2019, meeting #general

events@...
 

Amateur genealogist Zalman Usiskin will share "More Stories about Things
I've Learned >from Doing Genealogy" at the Sunday, Aug. 25, 2019, meeting
of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois at Temple Beth-El, 3610
Dundee Road, Northbrook, Ill. His presentation starts at 2 p.m.

Sign-in, networking with others interested in Jewish genealogy, and
access to the 800-volume JGSI research library and genealogy help desk
staffed by family history mavens will be available starting at 12:30
p.m.

Usiskin has been interested in the genealogy of the various branches of
his family since he was a teenager. Over the years, he has compiled
family trees on three of his four grandparents with a total of more than
4,800 named relatives. On his paternal great-grandfather's line he has
names of more than 1,000 descendants of Usiskins all over the world but
has never been able to definitively verify that any are blood relatives.

Usiskin, born in Chicago, is an emeritus professor of mathematics
education at the University of Chicago. In his field, he has given talks
in all 50 states and 27 foreign countries and has been a major speaker
at national and international conferences. This will mark the fourth
time that he has spoken at a JGSI meeting. In 2002, he spoke about
writing and distributing a family tree book. In 2015, he described
three examples of how people arranged genealogical information into
coffee table books for distribution to relatives. Last December, he
delivered a presentation called "Stories about Things I've Learned >from
Doing Genealogy."

Usiskin is a fine storyteller, and JGSI immediately invited him back
when we heard that he had more stories to tell that offer research
lessons or hints that might help others doing genealogy.

In his new presentation, questions are raised and discussed: Who goes on
a family tree? To what extent are family stories "cleansed"? How did a
"black sheep" of the family turn out to be just the opposite? How did
some Jews survive World War II in Europe and how might they be found
even today? How did DNA help to find both biological parents of someone
who was adopted? And he will explain how his wife's heritage can be
traced back to Adam and Eve. (What? You are skeptical?) Come to this
event to hear his explanation.

Submitted by:
Martin Fischer
Vice President-Publicity
Jewish Genealogical Society of Illinois


Synagogue in Vilnius closes temporarily for security concerns #lithuania

Andrew Seidenberg <andrew.seidenberg@...>
 

Jewish community closed Vilnius Synagogue for 2 days citing security
concerns following removal of plaque honoring anti-Soviet hero who
also was Holocaust collaborator

See article below for further details:
https://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2019/08/06/lithuania-vilnius-synagogue-closed/

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The link to this article is being shared as
a one-time informational announcement and will not be the
beginning of a thread.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Synagogue in Vilnius closes temporarily for security concerns #lithuania

Andrew Seidenberg <andrew.seidenberg@...>
 

Jewish community closed Vilnius Synagogue for 2 days citing security
concerns following removal of plaque honoring anti-Soviet hero who
also was Holocaust collaborator

See article below for further details:
https://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2019/08/06/lithuania-vilnius-synagogue-closed/

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The link to this article is being shared as
a one-time informational announcement and will not be the
beginning of a thread.


Seeking information re: Jakob Michael HONIG and his family #germany

Joyce Eastman
 

I have recently received information regarding the death of Jakob Michael
HONIG in Kassel, Germany. His death notice stated that he died on 1/12/1915
at the age of 43 (which would mean he was born in 1872) and that he was born
in Brody, Poland to Abraham Josef HONIG and Scheindel WILDER (my paternal
great-grandparents). His son Abraham Josef HONIG was the person that
recorded his death (it appears that he was named after his grandfather).
The record of death also noted that Jakob Michael's father was a businessman
and was already deceased in 1915, and mentions the wife of Jakob Michael
HONIG as Anna Debora (Anna Debora BRIEFWECHSLER).

A record of their children's birth was found on JewishGen as follows:
Abraham Josef HONIG born 09/13/1989 in Treysa, Germany; Rosa HONIG , born
03/26/1900 in Treysa, Germany; and Pepi HONIG born 05/27/1896 also in
Treysa, Germany. I have not been able to find any more records regarding
Jakob Michael HONIG's birth and other events in his life (other than his age
at the time of his death as noted above).

I would like to find out more about the life of Jakob Michael HONIG as well
as that of his wife, Anna Debora BRIEFWECHSLER, and their family. Any
assistance you can provide would be most appreciated.

Joyce Eastman, Orange City, FL USA wildwoman@...


German SIG #Germany Seeking information re: Jakob Michael HONIG and his family #germany

Joyce Eastman
 

I have recently received information regarding the death of Jakob Michael
HONIG in Kassel, Germany. His death notice stated that he died on 1/12/1915
at the age of 43 (which would mean he was born in 1872) and that he was born
in Brody, Poland to Abraham Josef HONIG and Scheindel WILDER (my paternal
great-grandparents). His son Abraham Josef HONIG was the person that
recorded his death (it appears that he was named after his grandfather).
The record of death also noted that Jakob Michael's father was a businessman
and was already deceased in 1915, and mentions the wife of Jakob Michael
HONIG as Anna Debora (Anna Debora BRIEFWECHSLER).

A record of their children's birth was found on JewishGen as follows:
Abraham Josef HONIG born 09/13/1989 in Treysa, Germany; Rosa HONIG , born
03/26/1900 in Treysa, Germany; and Pepi HONIG born 05/27/1896 also in
Treysa, Germany. I have not been able to find any more records regarding
Jakob Michael HONIG's birth and other events in his life (other than his age
at the time of his death as noted above).

I would like to find out more about the life of Jakob Michael HONIG as well
as that of his wife, Anna Debora BRIEFWECHSLER, and their family. Any
assistance you can provide would be most appreciated.

Joyce Eastman, Orange City, FL USA wildwoman@...


Mt Sharon Cemetery, Delaware County, Pennsylvania #general

Steve Pickoltz
 

Does this cemetery have an on line listing of it's burials? If so
does someone have the e-mail address?

Steve Pickholtz
Tabernacle, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mt Sharon Cemetery, Delaware County, Pennsylvania #general

Steve Pickoltz
 

Does this cemetery have an on line listing of it's burials? If so
does someone have the e-mail address?

Steve Pickholtz
Tabernacle, NJ


Israel relatives - GUTMAN #general

Michael Weinstein <einstein1250@...>
 

I am trading to track down relatives in Israel with the surname Gutman
or Guzman. I recently found a listing in a 1965 phone directory for
uz Pessah butcher shop at ** Sheinken in Givatayim. Pessah was married
to a cousin named Laiku. Thy had two children. Yichael had married a
woman named Shifra (Sarah) and they lived in Givatayim with their
children. The second son David had lived in Ashquelon. Laiku's mother,
Haiku, was the older sister of my grandmother, Anna Goldman (Nee: Berg).
The family had emigrated to Israel in the late 1940s. Their shtetl town
was Ostrog, Russia, now Ukraine. If this information rings a bell to
anyone in the group, please contact me.

Michael Weinstein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Israel relatives - GUTMAN #general

Michael Weinstein <einstein1250@...>
 

I am trading to track down relatives in Israel with the surname Gutman
or Guzman. I recently found a listing in a 1965 phone directory for
uz Pessah butcher shop at ** Sheinken in Givatayim. Pessah was married
to a cousin named Laiku. Thy had two children. Yichael had married a
woman named Shifra (Sarah) and they lived in Givatayim with their
children. The second son David had lived in Ashquelon. Laiku's mother,
Haiku, was the older sister of my grandmother, Anna Goldman (Nee: Berg).
The family had emigrated to Israel in the late 1940s. Their shtetl town
was Ostrog, Russia, now Ukraine. If this information rings a bell to
anyone in the group, please contact me.

Michael Weinstein


BCG Says Thank You to Family History Center with Day Long Free Webinars on Legacy Family Tree Webinars September 6, 2019 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) is "thanking" the Family
History Library and its staff for all they do for the genealogical
community with a free lecture series at the Salt Lake City Family History
Library. For those not in Salt Lake City on September 6, we can enjoy it at
home thanks to Legacy Family Tree Webinars. Legacy Family Tree Webinars is
part of the MyHeritage family of companies.

Six lectures will be presented, starting at 9:00 a.m. Mountain daylight time
(MDT) and running through to 5:00 p.m. MDT, on Friday, September 6, 2019.
(You can check your local time by using time zone converter at
https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html)

Speakers include Elizabeth Shown Mills, Martha Garrett, Judy Russell, Karen
Stanbary, Melinda Henningfield and Rick Sayre. Topics vary >from Genealogical
Proof, Finding missing Immigrants, Rules of Genealogical Privacy, Modified
DNA-Related Standards, BCG Standards for DNA; Reconstructing a Woman's Life

To register go to: https://familytreewebinars.com/category/463/bcg search
by the September 6 date. Clicking on each topic will provide additional
information for each lecture. Registration is required.

Remember, that on Legacy Family Tree Webinars, the webinars are available
free for a limited time following the actual lecture. Following the free
time period then they are individually available for purchase.

I have no affiliation with Legacy Family Tree Webinars nor MyHeritage and
this is posted solely for the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BCG Says Thank You to Family History Center with Day Long Free Webinars on Legacy Family Tree Webinars September 6, 2019 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) is "thanking" the Family
History Library and its staff for all they do for the genealogical
community with a free lecture series at the Salt Lake City Family History
Library. For those not in Salt Lake City on September 6, we can enjoy it at
home thanks to Legacy Family Tree Webinars. Legacy Family Tree Webinars is
part of the MyHeritage family of companies.

Six lectures will be presented, starting at 9:00 a.m. Mountain daylight time
(MDT) and running through to 5:00 p.m. MDT, on Friday, September 6, 2019.
(You can check your local time by using time zone converter at
https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html)

Speakers include Elizabeth Shown Mills, Martha Garrett, Judy Russell, Karen
Stanbary, Melinda Henningfield and Rick Sayre. Topics vary >from Genealogical
Proof, Finding missing Immigrants, Rules of Genealogical Privacy, Modified
DNA-Related Standards, BCG Standards for DNA; Reconstructing a Woman's Life

To register go to: https://familytreewebinars.com/category/463/bcg search
by the September 6 date. Clicking on each topic will provide additional
information for each lecture. Registration is required.

Remember, that on Legacy Family Tree Webinars, the webinars are available
free for a limited time following the actual lecture. Following the free
time period then they are individually available for purchase.

I have no affiliation with Legacy Family Tree Webinars nor MyHeritage and
this is posted solely for the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


2019 JewishGen conference in Cleveland (4) #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hello everybody,

This is my last post about the conference.

Several members of our Bessarabia community worked at the Translation
table and were Mentors for others. Inna Vayner did a lot of mentoring
and helped translating records, documents. Also Alan Levine worked so
many hours at Translation table that at some point I had to take him
out almost by force to breathe fresh air and getting lunch.

This year I announced in advance to have at the conference personal
consultations with anyone who is interested in Bessarabia/Moldova and
who has questions, issues with their research. 10 people scheduled such
consultation, and several more asked for "walk-in" consultation in
Cleveland. I found it very helpful for everyone and hopefully we can
do more of it at the next conference.

For many people this conference is a place to learn new things. Right
at the conference we discovered the new face of JewishGen website.
That was really exiting. We all heard >from Avrami Groll about many
changes happening in our JewishGen Community, website, Discussion
groups, even my and all other SIG Leaders title changed, but I still
like the old one.

For me personally such conference is a place to see old friends and
colleagues. Usually we are communicating online, and it is always fun
after 2 or 5 years of working together on a project, finally see each
other...

I would like others who participated at the conference, send their
comments, and if you have photos.

We will update the Bessarabia SIG website with all presentations of
our members and photos >from you.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia 2019 JewishGen conference in Cleveland (4) #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hello everybody,

This is my last post about the conference.

Several members of our Bessarabia community worked at the Translation
table and were Mentors for others. Inna Vayner did a lot of mentoring
and helped translating records, documents. Also Alan Levine worked so
many hours at Translation table that at some point I had to take him
out almost by force to breathe fresh air and getting lunch.

This year I announced in advance to have at the conference personal
consultations with anyone who is interested in Bessarabia/Moldova and
who has questions, issues with their research. 10 people scheduled such
consultation, and several more asked for "walk-in" consultation in
Cleveland. I found it very helpful for everyone and hopefully we can
do more of it at the next conference.

For many people this conference is a place to learn new things. Right
at the conference we discovered the new face of JewishGen website.
That was really exiting. We all heard >from Avrami Groll about many
changes happening in our JewishGen Community, website, Discussion
groups, even my and all other SIG Leaders title changed, but I still
like the old one.

For me personally such conference is a place to see old friends and
colleagues. Usually we are communicating online, and it is always fun
after 2 or 5 years of working together on a project, finally see each
other...

I would like others who participated at the conference, send their
comments, and if you have photos.

We will update the Bessarabia SIG website with all presentations of
our members and photos >from you.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator


2019 JewishGen conference in Cleveland (4) #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Hello everybody,

This is my last post about the conference.

Several members of our Bessarabia community worked at the Translation
table and were Mentors for others. Inna Vayner did a lot of mentoring
and helped translating records, documents. Also Alan Levine worked so
many hours at Translation table that at some point I had to take him
out almost by force to breathe fresh air and getting lunch.

This year I announced in advance to have at the conference personal
consultations with anyone who is interested in Bessarabia/Moldova and
who has questions, issues with their research. 10 people scheduled such
consultation, and several more asked for "walk-in" consultation in
Cleveland. I found it very helpful for everyone and hopefully we can
do more of it at the next conference.

For many people this conference is a place to learn new things. Right
at the conference we discovered the new face of JewishGen website.
That was really exiting. We all heard >from Avrami Groll about many
changes happening in our JewishGen Community, website, Discussion
groups, even my and all other SIG Leaders title changed, but I still
like the old one.

For me personally such conference is a place to see old friends and
colleagues. Usually we are communicating online, and it is always fun
after 2 or 5 years of working together on a project, finally see each
other...

I would like others who participated at the conference, send their
comments, and if you have photos.

We will update the Bessarabia SIG website with all presentations of
our members and photos >from you.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 2019 JewishGen conference in Cleveland (4) #general

Yefim Kogan
 

Hello everybody,

This is my last post about the conference.

Several members of our Bessarabia community worked at the Translation
table and were Mentors for others. Inna Vayner did a lot of mentoring
and helped translating records, documents. Also Alan Levine worked so
many hours at Translation table that at some point I had to take him
out almost by force to breathe fresh air and getting lunch.

This year I announced in advance to have at the conference personal
consultations with anyone who is interested in Bessarabia/Moldova and
who has questions, issues with their research. 10 people scheduled such
consultation, and several more asked for "walk-in" consultation in
Cleveland. I found it very helpful for everyone and hopefully we can
do more of it at the next conference.

For many people this conference is a place to learn new things. Right
at the conference we discovered the new face of JewishGen website.
That was really exiting. We all heard >from Avrami Groll about many
changes happening in our JewishGen Community, website, Discussion
groups, even my and all other SIG Leaders title changed, but I still
like the old one.

For me personally such conference is a place to see old friends and
colleagues. Usually we are communicating online, and it is always fun
after 2 or 5 years of working together on a project, finally see each
other...

I would like others who participated at the conference, send their
comments, and if you have photos.

We will update the Bessarabia SIG website with all presentations of
our members and photos >from you.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator


GLASS family-Shderot Chen St. Tel-Aviv #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

My father-in-law, Rabbi Moshe YERUSHALMY was somehow related to a
GLASS family who lived on Shderot Chen in Tel-Aviv. The GLASSs were
also connected to Dr. Yitchak REFAEL (VERFEL) who was a leader the the
Mizrachi party in Israel and was a cabinet minister.

My father-in-law was born in Grieve, near szcuchin and eventually
emmigrated to New York City and made aliya to Israel in 1964.

I would be happy to hear >from anyone who knows our connection to the above.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


DISTENFELD/EISEN-Zlochow, Poland-early 20th cent. #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

Anyone connected to a Rivka DISTENFELD (died around 1938 in Poland)
who was married to Zvi Hirsch EISEN (died 1952-NYC). This couple were
my wife's grandparents.

TIA

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem