Date   

Yudin #general

philafrum
 

Dear Genners,

I'm trying to locate other individuals who could've been related to
my great grandfather, Lejzer Yudin. He was the son of Berko, listed
on the 1907 Kiev Gubernia Duma Voters List, and resided in Demievka
in the Kiev district.

Evan Fishman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yudin #general

philafrum
 

Dear Genners,

I'm trying to locate other individuals who could've been related to
my great grandfather, Lejzer Yudin. He was the son of Berko, listed
on the 1907 Kiev Gubernia Duma Voters List, and resided in Demievka
in the Kiev district.

Evan Fishman


(Israel) Israel National Library Digitized Collection of Communal Ledgers from Long Lost Jewish European Communities #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Israel National Library has digitized a collection of communal ledgers
from Jewish European communities. The communities were >from hundreds of
years ago and the ledgers, known as pinkasim, kept track of financial
transactions, political happenings, and relations with non-Jewish government
bodies. Any Jewish community with a governing body had such a ledger. The
pinkasim give an understanding of early modern Jewish European history.

The first part of the project uploaded about 200 documents >from the years
1500 to 1800. During the 1800's Jewish communal self-governance was reduced
as Jews became more integrated into European societies. The Library does
not plan to translate the ledgers and they are in several languages,
including Hebrew, Yiddish, Polish and others.

The website of the Israel National Library is:
http://web.nli.org.il/sites/nli/english/pages/default.aspx
Their blog has more information on this new collection which can be read at:
https://blog.nli.org.il/en/

To read the AP story on this see:
https://www.apnews.com/3b3811a99f1041e1a4d5909141c3a883

Thank you to Randy Herschaft, Associated Press, for sharing the story with
us.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Israel) Israel National Library Digitized Collection of Communal Ledgers from Long Lost Jewish European Communities #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Israel National Library has digitized a collection of communal ledgers
from Jewish European communities. The communities were >from hundreds of
years ago and the ledgers, known as pinkasim, kept track of financial
transactions, political happenings, and relations with non-Jewish government
bodies. Any Jewish community with a governing body had such a ledger. The
pinkasim give an understanding of early modern Jewish European history.

The first part of the project uploaded about 200 documents >from the years
1500 to 1800. During the 1800's Jewish communal self-governance was reduced
as Jews became more integrated into European societies. The Library does
not plan to translate the ledgers and they are in several languages,
including Hebrew, Yiddish, Polish and others.

The website of the Israel National Library is:
http://web.nli.org.il/sites/nli/english/pages/default.aspx
Their blog has more information on this new collection which can be read at:
https://blog.nli.org.il/en/

To read the AP story on this see:
https://www.apnews.com/3b3811a99f1041e1a4d5909141c3a883

Thank you to Randy Herschaft, Associated Press, for sharing the story with
us.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Manifest for the "Merion" in August/September 1910 #general

Carl Perkins
 

I am seeking the manifest for a voyage of the ship "Merion", which
apparently sailed for North America >from Liverpool, England on August
16, 1910; possibly stopping at Montreal; and arriving at the Port of
Philadelphia, PA on September 4, 1910.
Thank you.

Carl M. Perkins
tamtzit@...
Needham, MA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Manifest for the "Merion" in August/September 1910 #general

Carl Perkins
 

I am seeking the manifest for a voyage of the ship "Merion", which
apparently sailed for North America >from Liverpool, England on August
16, 1910; possibly stopping at Montreal; and arriving at the Port of
Philadelphia, PA on September 4, 1910.
Thank you.

Carl M. Perkins
tamtzit@...
Needham, MA


ViewMate translation request - Polish #general

Gary Pokrassa
 

I've posted three vital records in Polish for which I need a
translation. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73706
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73707
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73708

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

Gary Pokrassa
JGID 70858


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Polish #general

Gary Pokrassa
 

I've posted three vital records in Polish for which I need a
translation. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73706
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73707
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73708

Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.
Thank you very much.

Gary Pokrassa
JGID 70858


Re: Looking for probate documentation for a person who died in New York City in 1985 #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Roy Ogus asked: "Does anyone have a suggestion for the best way to
obtain copies of the probate documentation (especially the will) of a
person who died in New York City in 1985? I haven't managed to find
this documentation on either FamilySearch or
Ancestry. Thanks for any suggestions!"

Roy, although Probate is a public file, there are few indexes or files
on the internet.

The first thing to specify is what borough/county of New York City
(New York County/Manhattan, Kings County/Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx,
Richmond County/Staten Island) as each of the 5 counties maintain the
probate files for those who were residents of their county. Then the
year is essential.

There are some really early indexes and files (pre 1910) on
FamilySearch. But for those residents of Queens and Brooklyn,
Familysearch has the probate indexes through the 1950s; these indexes
have names, addresses, date of death and the probate number and you
can browse the database by surname. Alas there is nothing like that
for New York City/Manhattan; but you can browse FamilySearch's partial
index through the early 1920s.

In any case, if you find an index that you wish to research further,
the next step would be to contact the court. But keep in mind that the
search and the copying of multiple documents can be quite expensive,
especially if there's any question about multiple folks with the same
name. It's optimal in New York City to research probate in person at
the county level.

Happy Hunting
Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc: https://www.JewishGen.org/education
Researching (all Galicia) ...KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burshtyn ...STECHER, TRACHMAN from
Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: https://KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Looking for probate documentation for a person who died in New York City in 1985 #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Roy Ogus asked: "Does anyone have a suggestion for the best way to
obtain copies of the probate documentation (especially the will) of a
person who died in New York City in 1985? I haven't managed to find
this documentation on either FamilySearch or
Ancestry. Thanks for any suggestions!"

Roy, although Probate is a public file, there are few indexes or files
on the internet.

The first thing to specify is what borough/county of New York City
(New York County/Manhattan, Kings County/Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx,
Richmond County/Staten Island) as each of the 5 counties maintain the
probate files for those who were residents of their county. Then the
year is essential.

There are some really early indexes and files (pre 1910) on
FamilySearch. But for those residents of Queens and Brooklyn,
Familysearch has the probate indexes through the 1950s; these indexes
have names, addresses, date of death and the probate number and you
can browse the database by surname. Alas there is nothing like that
for New York City/Manhattan; but you can browse FamilySearch's partial
index through the early 1920s.

In any case, if you find an index that you wish to research further,
the next step would be to contact the court. But keep in mind that the
search and the copying of multiple documents can be quite expensive,
especially if there's any question about multiple folks with the same
name. It's optimal in New York City to research probate in person at
the county level.

Happy Hunting
Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc: https://www.JewishGen.org/education
Researching (all Galicia) ...KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burshtyn ...STECHER, TRACHMAN from
Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: https://KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm


Missing Patronymic #general

Isabel Cymerman <isabelcym3@...>
 

Dear All,
In all the research I've done into my great-great- grandfather,
Pinkhus CUKIERMAN, I have never been able to discover his father's
name. Pinkhus was born in Siedlce, Poland, circa 1838. His death
date is unknown but he may have lived until the eve of WWI. At some
point he started using the surname of "ZABAWNY", and many of his
descendants continued to use it. (It means "amusing" in Polish).

In the Siedlce Births of 1876, Akta 94, he is called Pinkhus ZABAWNY,
age 38. In Siedlce Births of 1885, he is also listed as Pinkhus
ZABAWNY. No vital records appear to list his patronymic.

How can I find out his father's - and mother's - names.

TIA,

Isabel Cymerman
Southbury, CT


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Missing Patronymic #general

Isabel Cymerman <isabelcym3@...>
 

Dear All,
In all the research I've done into my great-great- grandfather,
Pinkhus CUKIERMAN, I have never been able to discover his father's
name. Pinkhus was born in Siedlce, Poland, circa 1838. His death
date is unknown but he may have lived until the eve of WWI. At some
point he started using the surname of "ZABAWNY", and many of his
descendants continued to use it. (It means "amusing" in Polish).

In the Siedlce Births of 1876, Akta 94, he is called Pinkhus ZABAWNY,
age 38. In Siedlce Births of 1885, he is also listed as Pinkhus
ZABAWNY. No vital records appear to list his patronymic.

How can I find out his father's - and mother's - names.

TIA,

Isabel Cymerman
Southbury, CT


Re: ukraine digest: June 17, 2019 #ukraine

Alan Shuchat
 

RTRFoundation.org is a good place to check whether there are records and where they are kept. In this case, it shows that there are census records for Kovel going back to 1858-1865 and these are housed in the Zhitomir archives. Kovel is a city in Ukraine and was in the Volyn gubernia (province). You can learn more about Kovel at https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kovel/kovel.htm.

Subject: SILVERMAN family
From: "Joan Silverman" <jbsilverman@...>
Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 13:32:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi,

I am very new to this mailing group and have recently (I think) found where
my paternal grandfather is from. His naturalization papers say Kovel,
Russia. After doing some research on Jewish Gen, I found the Jews of Kovel
were wiped out. My grandfather immigrated in either 1902 or 1903 and was
born about 1885. His name is Jacob Benjamin SILVERMAN. I guess I just
wanted to put this info out there to this mailing group, and ask if there
would be any records prior to 1885. I believe this town was in the city of
Volyn.
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUKHAT (Talnoe, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoe), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
ZILBERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: ukraine digest: June 17, 2019 #ukraine

Alan Shuchat
 

RTRFoundation.org is a good place to check whether there are records and where they are kept. In this case, it shows that there are census records for Kovel going back to 1858-1865 and these are housed in the Zhitomir archives. Kovel is a city in Ukraine and was in the Volyn gubernia (province). You can learn more about Kovel at https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kovel/kovel.htm.

Subject: SILVERMAN family
From: "Joan Silverman" <jbsilverman@...>
Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2019 13:32:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi,

I am very new to this mailing group and have recently (I think) found where
my paternal grandfather is from. His naturalization papers say Kovel,
Russia. After doing some research on Jewish Gen, I found the Jews of Kovel
were wiped out. My grandfather immigrated in either 1902 or 1903 and was
born about 1885. His name is Jacob Benjamin SILVERMAN. I guess I just
wanted to put this info out there to this mailing group, and ask if there
would be any records prior to 1885. I believe this town was in the city of
Volyn.
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUKHAT (Talnoe, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoe), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
ZILBERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


Re: Silverman family #ukraine

jrsackerman@...
 

See the Facebook group for Jews >from Kovel:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/246447952501150/?hc_location=ufi

And the website for the organization in Israel:
http://www.israeli-kovel-org.org/english.html

Volin is a district in which Kovel is one of many towns

Joel Ackerman
Jerusalem


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Silverman family #ukraine

jrsackerman@...
 

See the Facebook group for Jews >from Kovel:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/246447952501150/?hc_location=ufi

And the website for the organization in Israel:
http://www.israeli-kovel-org.org/english.html

Volin is a district in which Kovel is one of many towns

Joel Ackerman
Jerusalem


The June Issue of the Galitzianer #ukraine

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is delighted to announce the release of the June 2019
issue of our quarterly research journal, the "Galitzianer." This issue
draws readers in, bringing the world of former Jewish Galicia to life
in vibrant and poignant ways.

In this issue, we learn about the Jewish woman who became the first
female physician in Czortkow. We meet the American-born countess
suspected of poisoning her formerly Jewish husband >from Kolomyja. We
relive the experience of Hasidim gathered around the table of their
beloved rebbe in Tarnow. We stroll the main street of Horodenka, with
its Jewish-owned shops, in an interview with a woman raised there
during the interwar period. And, we witness the deteriorating
conditions and harrowing existence suffered by a Jewish physician in
the Lwow Ghetto.

The June issue consists of the following articles:
- "Research Corner: University Records Revisited" by Andrew Zalewski
- "Map Corner: Lwow University on the Move" by Jay Osborn
- "A Secret in the Family: The Story behind the Headlines" by Christina Craig
- "Jewish Life in Tarnow before the Shoah" by Felicia Lederberger-Graber
- "Interview with Tosia Szechter Schneider: Witness to a World That Is No More"
- "Surviving in Lwow: A Jewish Physician's Experience" by Arthur J. Wolak

The "Galitzianer" is a membership benefit of Gesher Galicia, though
anyone is invited to submit articles on Galicia-related topics. For
more details on our submissions policy, please visit
https://www.geshergalicia.org/the-galitzianer/#submissions or contact
me at submissions@....

Jodi G. Benjamin
Editor, The Galitzianer
--
---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries about Gesher Galicia to info@... and
all inquiries about the journal to submissions@....


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine The June Issue of the Galitzianer #ukraine

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia is delighted to announce the release of the June 2019
issue of our quarterly research journal, the "Galitzianer." This issue
draws readers in, bringing the world of former Jewish Galicia to life
in vibrant and poignant ways.

In this issue, we learn about the Jewish woman who became the first
female physician in Czortkow. We meet the American-born countess
suspected of poisoning her formerly Jewish husband >from Kolomyja. We
relive the experience of Hasidim gathered around the table of their
beloved rebbe in Tarnow. We stroll the main street of Horodenka, with
its Jewish-owned shops, in an interview with a woman raised there
during the interwar period. And, we witness the deteriorating
conditions and harrowing existence suffered by a Jewish physician in
the Lwow Ghetto.

The June issue consists of the following articles:
- "Research Corner: University Records Revisited" by Andrew Zalewski
- "Map Corner: Lwow University on the Move" by Jay Osborn
- "A Secret in the Family: The Story behind the Headlines" by Christina Craig
- "Jewish Life in Tarnow before the Shoah" by Felicia Lederberger-Graber
- "Interview with Tosia Szechter Schneider: Witness to a World That Is No More"
- "Surviving in Lwow: A Jewish Physician's Experience" by Arthur J. Wolak

The "Galitzianer" is a membership benefit of Gesher Galicia, though
anyone is invited to submit articles on Galicia-related topics. For
more details on our submissions policy, please visit
https://www.geshergalicia.org/the-galitzianer/#submissions or contact
me at submissions@....

Jodi G. Benjamin
Editor, The Galitzianer
--
---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries about Gesher Galicia to info@... and
all inquiries about the journal to submissions@....


JewishGen Future Scholars Fellows - Day 5 Recap #galicia

Nancy Siegel
 

Report >from Poland:

Day five was a challenging yet meaningful day.

The JewishGen Fellows left Krakow early in the morning, to visit the
the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp. Pawel Sawicki led an
extremely emotional and informative tour, emphasizing the "psychology
of hope" employed by the Nazis, along with the dehumanization of the
inmates in the camps.

We then visited the Auschwitz Jewish Center, where the Fellows ate
lunch (thank you Tomek Kuncewicz for letting us utilize space in the
cafe), and toured the Oswiecim Synagogue and AJC Museum. >from
there, the Fellows took a two-hour bus ride to Krzepice.

After checking in to their hotel, a delicious dinner was served, and
Steven Reece led a reflection exercise about our collective experience
visiting Auschwitz, before giving an orientation about the importance
of the cemetery work the Fellows are about to engage in.

Beginning today, the JewishGen Fellows will spend each day through
Wednesday evening cleaning up the Krzepice cemetery, which dates
back to 1749. The last known burial took place in 1946. There are
believed to be 650 Matzevot (tombstones), some of which are made
out of cast-iron.

On Monday and Tuesday, the JewishGen Fellows and The Matzevah
Foundation, Inc. will be joined by students >from the local non-Jewish
high school, who will come to help with the clean-up process.

Later this afternoon/evening, the JewishGen Fellows will also hear from
a representative of the Chief Rabbi of Poland with specific regard to
Halachik considerations and perspectives on maintaining Jewish
cemeteries, followed by a reflection exercise, and a session >from Dr.
Dan Oren, who will discuss how to decipher Matzevot (tombstones).

To see the photos associated with this post, and other updates and live
lvideos, go to and "Like" the JewishGen Facebook posts:
https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/

Nancy Siegel
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org


JewishGen Future Scholar Fellows - Day 6 Recap #galicia

Nancy Siegel
 

Report >from Poland:

This morning, the JewishGen Future Scholar Fellows began the portion
of their program whereby they can physically take part in preserving our
Jewish history and heritage.

By 9:00 AM, the JewishGen Fellows were at the Krzepice, Poland Jewish
Cemetery. They were met at the cemetery by 9th graders (along with
their teacher and principal) >from the local non-Jewish high school, who
came to help with the clean-up.

After getting to know each other, Steven D. Reece and Przemek Panasiuk
gave a general orientation which described the nature of our work, some
differences between Jewish and Christian burial practices, and some of
the Halachik guidelines which pertain to visiting and working in a Jewish
cemetery.

Before officially getting started with the task at hand, JewishGen Fellow
Sophia Stepansky recited the traditional Jewish blessing recited upon
visiting a cemetery for the first time in thirty days, and which describes
our collective belief in the eventual revival of the dead.

After that, the JewishGen Fellows went to work, often in partnership with
the students. The Fellows used a variety of tools, including power tools,
to clean the cemetery, and throughout the course of the day, a number
of Matzevot (tombstones) were discovered after cleaning away brush.

During lunch, the Fellows discussed why this type of work was
meaningful, and also explored some of the history behind Jewish burial
practices.

In the evening, after a reflection exercise with Steven Reece, Dr. Dan
Oren led a fascinating session about how to decipher Matzevot. He gave
an overview of some common acronyms, abbreviations, phrases, and
images, which are generally found on a tombstone, along with some
specific examples of complicated epitaphs >from which much can be
learned about a person's life.

Tomorrow, the JewishGen Fellows will be back at the cemetery, again
with students >from the local non-Jewish high school. In addition, at 3PM
(GMT+2), Dr. Dan Oren will be on Facebook Live (>from the Krzepice,
Poland Jewish Cemetery) with Avraham Groll to discuss the importance
of the JewishGen Fellowship Program, the history of the Jewish
cemetery here, and why there are so many cast-iron Matzevot in this
particular cemetery. In addition, there will be additional opportunities to
hear >from the JewishGen Fellows throughout the day.

To see the photos associated with this post, and other updates and live
videos, go to and "Like" the JewishGen Facebook posts:
https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/

Nancy Siegel
Communications Coordinator
JewishGen.org