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Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Mark Jacobson
 

Is this forum allowing politics now? Because I don't have an interest in debating or discussing ICE or any other non-genealogy topic. I don't care where fee the money goes, my problem is the fees, not where the money from the fees go. If this is really about ICE, and not about fees that will hurt genealogists and restrict access to public records, I don't support stopping the fee increase.

Mark Jacobson


On Monday, November 25, 2019, 05:07:10 PM EST, mamabirdlouise@... <mamabirdlouise@...> wrote:


I did comment on this proposal and sent copies to my two senators and representative.  I got a call back from Senator Baldwin's office and was told that she has not made a comment during this comment period; I suspect she and most senators are not very aware of this issue.  So it's time to flood their offices!

Please note that the proposal includes permission to transfer funds from these USCIS fees to ICE, which is an enforcement agency, as we all know only too well.  My senator has gone on record opposing this kind of funds transfer and that may be the hook that gets the attention of congresspeople; it certainly should get OUR attention. 
--
Louise Goldstein

Researching GOLDSTEIN/GOLDSZTERN, BRANDT, WOLOCH, HERSZENFELD (Terespol, Piszczac, Poland; Brest, Belarus); RONEN (Kiyev, Fastov, Ukraine; Lyoev, Belarus); LOPUSHANSKIY; ROZENZUMEN/BEN-DOV (Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland; Israel); BATTALEN, POPKOV (Voronezh, Russia); CHALEWSKY/CHALLOV (Krive Ozero, Ukraine).  https://familyhistorieslouise.com/


BIERENKRANT--Argentina

Sheldon Dan <sheldan1955@...>
 

I am looking for information regarding the BIERENKRANT family in Argentina.  I understand that they may have originated in the same area that my wife's BIRNKRANT family originated.
--
Sheldon Dan
sheldan1955@...


legal changed names - general

Herbert Lazerow
 

<Our ancestors that immigrated to America, 1900-1920, came with their European name.   The spouse had the European spelling of the name as well as the children.   When husband/father naturalized and legally changed his name…  1) did his wife and children automatically became naturalized citizens?>
   Before about 1922, naturalization of the husband also naturalized the wife because husband and wife were regarded as one in loyalties and that choice was viewed as the husband's. (Parenthetically, if a female U.S. citizen married an alien, she became an alien.) The children did not become citizens unless they were specifically listed on the naturalization petition.
  2) did the wife and children’s spelling of the name legally change at that time also?
   One must realize that at that time there were next to no official documents that our ancestors had.  Few had driver's licenses.  Social security does not arrive until 1935, and not until later for the self-employed. So there was little occasion to use a particular spelling of the name. Officially, the name change in the petition probably included wife and children, but it was doubtful that it had any practical significance.
  3) The American born children - would they use the European spellings until dad naturalized?   
     I would assume that everyone in the nuclear family tried to spell the name in the same way to avoid confusion, though in one of the families I am following, some siblings spelled it with a single M and others with a double M.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law, University of San Diego
5998 Alcala Park, San Diego CA 92110 U.S.A.
(619)260-4597 office, (858)453-2388 cell, lazer@...
Author: Mastering Art Law (Carolina Academic Press 2015)


Re: legal changed names - general

Sally Bruckheimer
 

"Our ancestors that immigrated to America, 1900-1920, came with their European name.   The spouse had the European spelling of the name as well as the children.   When husband/father naturalized and legally changed his name…  1) did his wife and children automatically became naturalized citizens?  2) did the wife and children’s spelling of the name legally change at that time also?  3) The American born children - would they use the European spellings until dad naturalized? "

1) Up until Social Security and Drivers Licenses, anyone could call him/her self whatever they wanted. Obviously, if the man change Wojochowicz to Cohen at naturalization and named family members, they would be included in the name change - but they could call themselves whatever they wanted. 

2) Until WW I or so, women were automatically whatever nationality their husband was. If an American born woman married a Russian immigrant (not naturalized), she would become a Russian, and when he naturalized she would be too. A little later, women didn't lose their citizenship, and they had to naturalize separately. If he didn't naturalize until after the law changed, she would have to naturalize to get her citizenship back.

3) American born children (including the father of a friend of mine) were named whatever on their birth record. So a child born Sam Cohen, the son of Shlomo Wojochowicz was automatically changed. But it didn't really matter until after WW I.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


#Hungary #hungary

Kglattstein
 

Looking for help finding the current names (or historical Hungarian names) for the birth cities Illesfaln and Fleshflow mentioned in 2 naturalization documents.   I have a Declaration of Intention for Naturalization that states a grandfather (Josef Glattstein) was born in Illesfaln sp? and a Petition for Naturalization that states he was born in Fleshflow sp? and his wife was born in Illesfaln.  However, I can't find either town in Hungary or anything that is similar.  His family is in Siroka, Saros, Hungary in 1869 and Josef indicates his last residence was Siroke.  We have another document that states that his wife is from Kishvarda. Josef spoke Hungarian, German, Yiddish, and English. I looked at the neighboring towns and nothing looks similar. https://www.cisarik.com/0_Siroke_Presov_PV_Saros_Saris.html

I've attached the 2 documents that state the birthplaces.  

Thank you.


Edelhofer family from Vienna

rv Kaplan
 


Can anyone help me find out information about the family of Siegfried Ernst Edelhofer?  He came from Vienna to Britain on the Kindertransport, and was born in 1928 to Max and Regina Elizabeth Edelhofer.  He was taken in by a family called Smart in Inverness, Scotland. After the war, he moved to Yeovil, Somerset, to study engineering technology.  He changed his name to Iain Graham Hamilton Stewart.

thanks

Harvey Kaplan
Scottish Jewish Archives Centre
Glasgow 



Re: Legal source for UK Internments

Tony Hausner
 

If any of you are interested in joining our google email group devoted to the Isle of Man interment during World War II, please contact me at thausner@.... I have sent a couple of you an invite to join our group.  


Re: Deportations from France #france #holocaust

jbonline1111@...
 

The Steve Morse pages are in English. 


Re: Mount Zion Cemetery seeks old photos and documents

Jo Ann Goldwater
 

Do they want photos of people who are buried there or only photos of the cemetery? 


Re: Legal source for UK Internments

Lewis, Megan
 

Judith,

There a number of academic books on the topic such as "Totally un-English"? : Britain's internment of "enemy aliens" in two world wars edited by Richard Dove (2005) and Internment during the Second World War : a comparative study of Great Britain and the USA by Rachel Pistol (2017.)

Megan

Megan Lewis  Reference Librarian  202.314.7860
National Institute for Holocaust Documentation
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
www.ushmm.org

NEVER AGAIN: WHAT YOU DO MATTERS

Support the Campaign for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum


Re: Eilat Gordin Levitan

olewarskule7@...
 

I note the name LEVITAN. Would there be connection to Murray Levitan, born in Brooklyn, ca 1921, lived on Long Island, family was in lamp business??

Herb Derman


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

mamabirdlouise@...
 

I did comment on this proposal and sent copies to my two senators and representative.  I got a call back from Senator Baldwin's office and was told that she has not made a comment during this comment period; I suspect she and most senators are not very aware of this issue.  So it's time to flood their offices!

Please note that the proposal includes permission to transfer funds from these USCIS fees to ICE, which is an enforcement agency, as we all know only too well.  My senator has gone on record opposing this kind of funds transfer and that may be the hook that gets the attention of congresspeople; it certainly should get OUR attention. 
--
Louise Goldstein

Researching GOLDSTEIN/GOLDSZTERN, BRANDT, WOLOCH, HERSZENFELD (Terespol, Piszczac, Poland; Brest, Belarus); RONEN (Kiyev, Fastov, Ukraine; Lyoev, Belarus); LOPUSHANSKIY; ROZENZUMEN/BEN-DOV (Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland; Israel); BATTALEN, POPKOV (Voronezh, Russia); CHALEWSKY/CHALLOV (Krive Ozero, Ukraine).  https://familyhistorieslouise.com/


writing to a cemetery in Israel

Wendy Griswold
 

Dear cousins,

hope you are all well and happily researching.

All I know is that over the years I have gotten better results writing
letters to cemeteries than calling.

So I've got, courtesy of Ancestry,

Chevra Kadisha, Harav Steiglitz (Chairman) Rehov Petah Tikva 12, Netanya 42460.

How would I address an envelope? I think Rehov Petah Tikva 12 might be
the street address of the cemetery but the office might be something
else? Would I address an envelope to Chevra Kadisha, Netanya Israel?

Sorry to be such a bonehead.

And thanks

Wendy Griswold
Jupiter FL
searching: Ukraine, Zurawno: Blitz, Pfeiffer (all spellings)
Nowy Sacz area: Einhorn, Wenzelberg, Shifuldrem (all creative spellings)
Ekaterinoslav/Dniepro: Dwass, Garfinkel


Re: Legal source for UK Internments

Kay Sharpe
 

Hi
I have documents showing details of my mum who was interned and her sister who wasn't obtained from Bad Arolsen https://arolsen-archives.org/en/ 
Although I cannot suggest a legal reason for internment I understand that everyone who was to be interned was arrested around May 1940 due to an outcry in the British press about working alongside foreign spies. My poor, innocent,  quiet mum was put in Holloway until they were able to move her to the Isle of Mann. Having said that she was looked after and fed well and had freedom within the town. Sorry I cannot help more.  


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Chuck Weinstein
 

Just to add my two kopecks to this discussion, JewishGen is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose rules prevent it from lobbying or taking a political position.  The resources from JewishGen are freely available to all with donors receiving some extra perks in search aids.  Litvak SIG is a separate organization, but their databases are also freely available via JewishGen.  Their donors get advance abilities to search recent additions to their databases.  There is nothing hidden behind paywalls through either organization.  That is irrelevant to the discussion of federal cost increases that will effectively eliminate taxpayer funded material from public view.  USCIS is a government agency which holds files that are very useful for genealogical purposes and help family historians break though many brick walls.  Their genealogy service has provided much useful information, but the proposed costs will significantly cut down usage of the service, which, based on experience, will lead to it being eliminated in the future.  That seems to be part of the plan.  Conflating government services provided at a profit to the US Government with services provided by a non-profit organization that depends on donations to survive is neither useful nor correct.  It is up to you as to whether or not you wish to comment to the government about the proposed increases in costs, but you are way off base in criticizing JewishGen and other non profits for asking people to donate a small amount for immediate or easier access to data that is otherwise freely available.  I am neither a spokesperson nor an officer of JewishGen, Inc., just a researcher who is a donor, but appreciates the services provided over the years in helping me with my family history.

Chuck Weinstein
Bellport, NY
chuck1@...


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Marion Werle
 

Bob,

Genealogy is not free - acquisition, translation and compilation of record sets incurs costs. Writing directly to an Archives incurs costs. Ordering records from an agency incurs costs. JewishGen doesn't charge for services, and is staffed mainly with volunteers, but incurs costs for permanent staff and server infrastructure (housed at Ancestry),  among other things. FamilySearch is supported by the LDS Church. Ancestry and MyHeritage are subscription websites, but can be accessed for free in many libraries. Not every resource that a genealogist needs is free or supported by a foundation. Professional genealogists charge for their time because it's how they make their living and they incur costs as well. 

Not all LitvakSIG research groups are actively translating records at this point, since known records may already have been translated and are publically available for free. When you access these records, you are reaping the benefits of previous contributors. And 18 months goes by quickly, even if you aren't a subscriber. 

As for USCIS, the proposed fee increases far exceed what is reasonable for a government agency.

Marion Werle
<werleme@...>
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Bob Bloomberg
 

Marion,

I agree.  It does not remotely compare to the USCIS costs.

But my point is that Litvack records are NOT free.  You have to pay $100 or wait 18 months to get new records. That is NOT free.  

Yes, a lot of time and effort have gone in to compiling and digitizing these records.  The same can be said for the Internet Archive, the Hathi Trust, the Library of Congress, Harvard University and endless other repositories of records.  They are supported by donations, legacies, etc.  That way everybody gets equal access, and no one is left out because they can't afford $100.

On Mon, Nov 25, 2019 at 12:01 PM Marion Werle <werleme@...> wrote:
Bob,

LitvakSIG membership in a District Research Group (DRG) is a multiyear membership (5 years) which supports the translation and acquisition costs of Lithuanian Jewish records. It makes the records available to DRG members via spreadsheets as soon as they are translated and compiled. After 18 months, they are made available free to everybody on the LitvakSIG website and on JewishGen, so there is a huge number of records freely available, since the SIG has been in existence for 25 years.

This doesn't even remotely compare to the proposed USCIS per record search and individual file charges which far exceed that of a 5-year DRG membership.

Marion Werle
<werleme@...>
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Marion Werle
 

Bob,

LitvakSIG membership in a District Research Group (DRG) is a multiyear membership (5 years) which supports the translation and acquisition costs of Lithuanian Jewish records. It makes the records available to DRG members via spreadsheets as soon as they are translated and compiled. After 18 months, they are made available free to everybody on the LitvakSIG website and on JewishGen, so there is a huge number of records freely available, since the SIG has been in existence for 25 years.

This doesn't even remotely compare to the proposed USCIS per record search and individual file charges which far exceed that of a 5-year DRG membership.

Marion Werle
<werleme@...>
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab


Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

amy wachs
 

Bob Bloomberg complained about genealogists' concern about the pending price increase of USCIS records by wrongly asserting that LitvakSIG charges $100 to get records.  LitvakSIG is a non-profit organization staffed entirely by volunteers.  We have been engaged for more than 20 years in the very costly and time-consuming mission of finding and translating surviving Jewish records in Lithuanian archives.  We have translated more than a million records, and have made them available to the public at no charge on LitvakSIG's All Lithuania Database.  The All Lithuania Database is freely-searchable via JewishGen or LitvakSIG's website.  The process of translating archival records is expensive, and LitvakSIG engages in fund-raising to be able to fund this important work.   We value and appreciate our donors.  Qualified contributors of $100 to a specific LitvakSIG project receive certain benefits, including early access to newly translated records before they are added to the freely-searchable All Lithuania Database.  
Amy Wachs


Re: Grave at Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn

info@...
 

Jacob, Is it possible to please see if you have pictures for the following graves at Washington Cemetery?
Thank you so much. My email is hallo13@...

Tamara

John Schwartz - Cemetery 5, post 474, row 8, grave 4

Frieda Schwartz - Cem 2, post 235, row 4, gr 3

Meyer Schwartz - cem 1, post 80, row 2, gr 2

Meyer Schwartz - cem 2, post 235, row 1, gr 6

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