Date   

Nathan EGLICK in Philadelphia #general

Lea Haber Gedalia <msleag@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I wander if you have ever heard of a rabbi/schochet Nathan EGLICK whom I
found on 1910 census in Philadelphia.

He appears on 1930 Philadelphia census living with daughter and family .

He came >from Lithuania and was the father of the famous Dr. Samuel Eglick
(1892-1953).

I am looking for his burial grounds or any material that has to do with
naturalization.

Lea Haber Gedalia,Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nathan EGLICK in Philadelphia #general

Lea Haber Gedalia <msleag@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I wander if you have ever heard of a rabbi/schochet Nathan EGLICK whom I
found on 1910 census in Philadelphia.

He appears on 1930 Philadelphia census living with daughter and family .

He came >from Lithuania and was the father of the famous Dr. Samuel Eglick
(1892-1953).

I am looking for his burial grounds or any material that has to do with
naturalization.

Lea Haber Gedalia,Israel


Polatsk #general

nfbrant@...
 

Hello,

Does anyone know if the Mormon Library has records >from Polatsk, Belarus?
Also is there a SIG >from Polatsk?

Thank you,

Nancy Brant
nfbrant@aol.com
Cincinnati, OH


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polatsk #general

nfbrant@...
 

Hello,

Does anyone know if the Mormon Library has records >from Polatsk, Belarus?
Also is there a SIG >from Polatsk?

Thank you,

Nancy Brant
nfbrant@aol.com
Cincinnati, OH


Re: Conscription of British Jews into Russian Army c.WW1 #general

boris
 

Naomi Leon's posting on the subject was the most informative and an
interesting read. She already sounds like an expert and I personally learned
a lot.

A few minor comments:

A "recruiter" or "some kind of agent" of the Russian government sounds
strange, but not implausible. The real question is What serious reasons have
compelled not one, but four men in their twenties to go to back to Russia to
fight the war that was not theirs? If memoirs of other Russian emigrants
with similar life story exist, they may provide a clue to the mind set and,
possibly, to the direction of research.

Naomi Leon further writes: "...Wormwood Scrubs' prison records that many
Jewish political 'dissidents' were conscripted into the Russian army under
the terms of their release >from prison..."

If the statement is accurate, there must have been an agreement in place
between the British and the Russian governments. This agreement might shed
light on the areas of cooperation, including the existence of "recruiters"
or "agents".

Regarding anti-British radicalism, it was somewhat comparable in nature to
anarchism in the USA. Off-hand, Emma Goldman's case comes to mind as she was
one of the best known personalities. She was expelled >from the US for
anarchist propaganda, went to Soviet Russia, was quickly disillusioned, got
out with great difficulties, wrote memoirs, died in Canada. She was sad
all her life of not being able to return to America.

Writing to a Russian Embassy of today is an interesting exercise but not
more. I would try to learn instead, >from British sources, what happened to
the archives of the Tsarist Russian embassy in London after 1917. Here in
the US, archives of the embassy and its several consulates were first dumped
in the unoccupied Russian embassy building in Washington DC. On the night
before diplomatic relations were established between the US and the USSR in
1934, the records were transferred to the National Archives where they sat
until the late 1980's, when the State Department gave them back to the Soviets.
Fortunately, due to the perseverance of the JGS of Washington, the records
were microfilmed and indexed by then, and thus available to us today.

Boris Feldblyum
boris@bfcollection.net
Potomac, MD, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Conscription of British Jews into Russian Army c.WW1 #general

boris
 

Naomi Leon's posting on the subject was the most informative and an
interesting read. She already sounds like an expert and I personally learned
a lot.

A few minor comments:

A "recruiter" or "some kind of agent" of the Russian government sounds
strange, but not implausible. The real question is What serious reasons have
compelled not one, but four men in their twenties to go to back to Russia to
fight the war that was not theirs? If memoirs of other Russian emigrants
with similar life story exist, they may provide a clue to the mind set and,
possibly, to the direction of research.

Naomi Leon further writes: "...Wormwood Scrubs' prison records that many
Jewish political 'dissidents' were conscripted into the Russian army under
the terms of their release >from prison..."

If the statement is accurate, there must have been an agreement in place
between the British and the Russian governments. This agreement might shed
light on the areas of cooperation, including the existence of "recruiters"
or "agents".

Regarding anti-British radicalism, it was somewhat comparable in nature to
anarchism in the USA. Off-hand, Emma Goldman's case comes to mind as she was
one of the best known personalities. She was expelled >from the US for
anarchist propaganda, went to Soviet Russia, was quickly disillusioned, got
out with great difficulties, wrote memoirs, died in Canada. She was sad
all her life of not being able to return to America.

Writing to a Russian Embassy of today is an interesting exercise but not
more. I would try to learn instead, >from British sources, what happened to
the archives of the Tsarist Russian embassy in London after 1917. Here in
the US, archives of the embassy and its several consulates were first dumped
in the unoccupied Russian embassy building in Washington DC. On the night
before diplomatic relations were established between the US and the USSR in
1934, the records were transferred to the National Archives where they sat
until the late 1980's, when the State Department gave them back to the Soviets.
Fortunately, due to the perseverance of the JGS of Washington, the records
were microfilmed and indexed by then, and thus available to us today.

Boris Feldblyum
boris@bfcollection.net
Potomac, MD, USA


Re: German registration of Belgian Jews #galicia

Philip Trauring
 

Has anyone successfully retrieved records >from the archives
mentioned? I'm going to try to get records on my family in the
Registers of Jews in Antwerp and other related archives at the
museum, but I'm wondering how people have gone about it in the
past and what their experiences have been. Any suggestions on
the best way to access these records would be appreciated.

Another interesting thing listed on the web site of the Jewish
Museum of Deportation and Resistance
(http://www.cicb.be/en/archives_en.htm#13) is that they are
apparently digitizing the central State Archives files we've been
discussing, with a planned completion date of 2012.

Philip Trauring

On Aug 28, 2010, at 6:39 PM, Renee Steinig wrote:

... Records similar to what Rivka received are mentioned on the
website of the Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance
(Joods Museum van Deportatie en Verzet) in Mechelen, Belgium
... One of the museum's archival collections is "The Register of
Jews >from Belgium," consisting of "217 ring binders containing
the registration cards of Belgian Jews named in the Register."
... The site also describes "The Register of Jews >from Antwerp"
and a number of other collections....


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: German registration of Belgian Jews #galicia

Philip Trauring
 

Has anyone successfully retrieved records >from the archives
mentioned? I'm going to try to get records on my family in the
Registers of Jews in Antwerp and other related archives at the
museum, but I'm wondering how people have gone about it in the
past and what their experiences have been. Any suggestions on
the best way to access these records would be appreciated.

Another interesting thing listed on the web site of the Jewish
Museum of Deportation and Resistance
(http://www.cicb.be/en/archives_en.htm#13) is that they are
apparently digitizing the central State Archives files we've been
discussing, with a planned completion date of 2012.

Philip Trauring

On Aug 28, 2010, at 6:39 PM, Renee Steinig wrote:

... Records similar to what Rivka received are mentioned on the
website of the Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance
(Joods Museum van Deportatie en Verzet) in Mechelen, Belgium
... One of the museum's archival collections is "The Register of
Jews >from Belgium," consisting of "217 ring binders containing
the registration cards of Belgian Jews named in the Register."
... The site also describes "The Register of Jews >from Antwerp"
and a number of other collections....


RED #romania

msleag@...
 

I also have some redheaded ancestors called Rusho in Romanian
Lea Haber Gedalia,Israel


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Red heads in Moldova
From: path@interlog.com


Harriet Weidenbaum wrote:

My great-grandfather Israel Leventhal was a red head and was nicknamed
RED. I was wondering how common that was. Someone recently contacted
me that his grandfather was also nicknamed RED and that made me think
to inquire about this.


Romania SIG #Romania RED #romania

msleag@...
 

I also have some redheaded ancestors called Rusho in Romanian
Lea Haber Gedalia,Israel


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Red heads in Moldova
From: path@interlog.com


Harriet Weidenbaum wrote:

My great-grandfather Israel Leventhal was a red head and was nicknamed
RED. I was wondering how common that was. Someone recently contacted
me that his grandfather was also nicknamed RED and that made me think
to inquire about this.


Information about KRUPNICK #rabbinic

Gloria Wolfson
 

I'm looking for information on a Rabbi Hanoch halevi KRUPNICK. Supposedly he
was a rabbi of Shargarod and died in 1905 and is buried in Shargarod but I
have been unable to confirm this. He had a grandson, Baruch Karu (Krupnick)
who wrote on religious issues >from Israel (I'm not sure that he was a
rabbi). Baruch Karu was born in 1889.

Rabbi Hanoch supposedly had a son Ze'ev (Dov Velvel) and another son Yakov
(Baruch Karu's father) as well as some other children including a daughter
Miriam.

My grandfather's name was David Tzvi ben Ze'ev halevi Krupnick and he was
born in 1858 (all dates are approximate). My father was born in either 1907
or 1908 and his name was Hanoch. My father also had a cousin (born in about
1925) whose name was Hanoch.

It appears to me that there must be a connection but I have no evidence. Is
there anyone who can confirm the existence of this Rabbi or who has any
further information?

Gloria K Wolfson
Vancouver, BC


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Information about KRUPNICK #rabbinic

Gloria Wolfson
 

I'm looking for information on a Rabbi Hanoch halevi KRUPNICK. Supposedly he
was a rabbi of Shargarod and died in 1905 and is buried in Shargarod but I
have been unable to confirm this. He had a grandson, Baruch Karu (Krupnick)
who wrote on religious issues >from Israel (I'm not sure that he was a
rabbi). Baruch Karu was born in 1889.

Rabbi Hanoch supposedly had a son Ze'ev (Dov Velvel) and another son Yakov
(Baruch Karu's father) as well as some other children including a daughter
Miriam.

My grandfather's name was David Tzvi ben Ze'ev halevi Krupnick and he was
born in 1858 (all dates are approximate). My father was born in either 1907
or 1908 and his name was Hanoch. My father also had a cousin (born in about
1925) whose name was Hanoch.

It appears to me that there must be a connection but I have no evidence. Is
there anyone who can confirm the existence of this Rabbi or who has any
further information?

Gloria K Wolfson
Vancouver, BC


Re: CHAMITA #poland

Judy Simon
 

my mom's maiden name which is CHAMITA. =A0There is no one left in my
family with that surname.... I googled Chamita, and there seems to be a
city in New Mexico called Chamita which has led me to believe that my
maternal grandfather's ancestors must have been Spanish.
It is possible that the surname CHAMITA could have Sephardic roots.
Pere Bonnin lists similar names in his book Sangra Judia that were
used by Jews in Spain (HAMETE, 1356, Toledo; HAMID, 1347, Toledo) and
Harry Stein lists several similar names used by Sephardim on the
surname search engine at his website www.sephardim.com (CHAMI, HAMIS,
HAMMIT).

Judy Simon
Stony Brook, NY
researching BROZGOL (Latvia, Spain); KAPELUSHNIK, MIRANSKY, SKUTELSKY,
PASSMAN, RAPPAPORT (Latvia); LEFKOWITZ, KELMER, MEZELSOR, OLSTEIN,
CHOJNA, AKERMAN, PLANCZNER (Lodz area, Poland).


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Re: CHAMITA #sephardic

Judy Simon
 

my mom's maiden name which is CHAMITA. =A0There is no one left in my
family with that surname.... I googled Chamita, and there seems to be a
city in New Mexico called Chamita which has led me to believe that my
maternal grandfather's ancestors must have been Spanish.
It is possible that the surname CHAMITA could have Sephardic roots.
Pere Bonnin lists similar names in his book Sangra Judia that were
used by Jews in Spain (HAMETE, 1356, Toledo; HAMID, 1347, Toledo) and
Harry Stein lists several similar names used by Sephardim on the
surname search engine at his website www.sephardim.com (CHAMI, HAMIS,
HAMMIT).

Judy Simon
Stony Brook, NY
researching BROZGOL (Latvia, Spain); KAPELUSHNIK, MIRANSKY, SKUTELSKY,
PASSMAN, RAPPAPORT (Latvia); LEFKOWITZ, KELMER, MEZELSOR, OLSTEIN,
CHOJNA, AKERMAN, PLANCZNER (Lodz area, Poland).


Re: CHAMITA #poland

MACSTA <macsta@...>
 

Dear Dina,

You wrote:

You are looking for the surname CHAMITA >from Chrzanow, Lublin, Poland and
while Googling you found a locality called Chamita in New Mexico.
====>
First all of all, the surname CHAMITA is pronounced KHAMITA in Polish while,
the locality name in New Mexico is pronounced TSHAMITA in English or
Spanish. The same spelling is only a coincidence.

This is why I suggest the following:
1. A look up in:
Dictionary of Jewish Surnames in the Kingdom of Poland, by Alexander
Beider. Teaneck, N.J. : Avotaynu, 1996.
and
Dictionary of Jewish surnames >from Galicia, by Alexander Beider,
Bergenfield, N.J. : Avotaynu, 2004

2. To write to all those researching their families >from Chrzanow and are
listed in the Family Finder of the JewishGen.
Some of them may have in their family trees relatives married with CHAMITA
family members

3. Check the rich collection of databases found on the JewishGen website

4. Check the Yad Vashem Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names. There are
eight CHAMITA or CHAMITTA.

I am afraid you still have a lot to do.

Good luck and Shalom,

Mathilde Tagger
Sephardim SIG Coordinator
Israel Genealogical Society
www.isragen.org.il


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Re: CHAMITA #sephardic

MACSTA <macsta@...>
 

Dear Dina,

You wrote:

You are looking for the surname CHAMITA >from Chrzanow, Lublin, Poland and
while Googling you found a locality called Chamita in New Mexico.
====>
First all of all, the surname CHAMITA is pronounced KHAMITA in Polish while,
the locality name in New Mexico is pronounced TSHAMITA in English or
Spanish. The same spelling is only a coincidence.

This is why I suggest the following:
1. A look up in:
Dictionary of Jewish Surnames in the Kingdom of Poland, by Alexander
Beider. Teaneck, N.J. : Avotaynu, 1996.
and
Dictionary of Jewish surnames >from Galicia, by Alexander Beider,
Bergenfield, N.J. : Avotaynu, 2004

2. To write to all those researching their families >from Chrzanow and are
listed in the Family Finder of the JewishGen.
Some of them may have in their family trees relatives married with CHAMITA
family members

3. Check the rich collection of databases found on the JewishGen website

4. Check the Yad Vashem Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names. There are
eight CHAMITA or CHAMITTA.

I am afraid you still have a lot to do.

Good luck and Shalom,

Mathilde Tagger
Sephardim SIG Coordinator
Israel Genealogical Society
www.isragen.org.il


NYC Police Blotter records - availability and access #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Genners,
If anyone has had an opportunity to see these in person, I would
appreciate their getting in touch with me off-line.

Many thanks,

Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA
EBIN: Russia, New York, USA
FRANKEL: Poland, London, England
GOLDRATH/GOLD: Praszka, Poland, London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania, London, England, NYC, NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland, London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland, London, England, NYC, NY, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NYC Police Blotter records - availability and access #general

jeremy frankel
 

Dear Genners,
If anyone has had an opportunity to see these in person, I would
appreciate their getting in touch with me off-line.

Many thanks,

Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA
EBIN: Russia, New York, USA
FRANKEL: Poland, London, England
GOLDRATH/GOLD: Praszka, Poland, London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania, London, England, NYC, NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland, London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland, London, England, NYC, NY, USA


Clarification of Hebrew Date #general

Richard Gilbert
 

Hi,

When I read the date I saw it as 4th Shevat 5687. This corresponded with 7
January 1927. It is unlikely if someone was being presented with a memento
to mark an occasion that the date would have been written as Wednesday 5687.
I have seen the spelling for the month of Shevat also spelt as Shebat. It's
equally possibly when translating to English that it was spelt as Shabat.
However, when referring to the Sabbath, it is universally spelt in English
as Shabbat/Shabbes/Shobbos, that is with x 2 bs. Also in Hebrew the month
of Shevat is spelt using the Hebrew letters of Shin Vet Tet. Whereas
Shabbat is spelt Shin Bet Taf. The last letter of Shabbat (Taf) would have
been pronounced by Ashkenazim (European Jews) in 1927 with an "s" sound not
a "t" sound. Since Shabat is rendered on the memento as with a "t" and not
an "s", I think the date being referred to is 4th Shevat 5687.

I hope this helps

Best wishes,

Richard Gilbert
Bushey Heath, Hertfordshire


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Clarification of Hebrew Date #general

Richard Gilbert
 

Hi,

When I read the date I saw it as 4th Shevat 5687. This corresponded with 7
January 1927. It is unlikely if someone was being presented with a memento
to mark an occasion that the date would have been written as Wednesday 5687.
I have seen the spelling for the month of Shevat also spelt as Shebat. It's
equally possibly when translating to English that it was spelt as Shabat.
However, when referring to the Sabbath, it is universally spelt in English
as Shabbat/Shabbes/Shobbos, that is with x 2 bs. Also in Hebrew the month
of Shevat is spelt using the Hebrew letters of Shin Vet Tet. Whereas
Shabbat is spelt Shin Bet Taf. The last letter of Shabbat (Taf) would have
been pronounced by Ashkenazim (European Jews) in 1927 with an "s" sound not
a "t" sound. Since Shabat is rendered on the memento as with a "t" and not
an "s", I think the date being referred to is 4th Shevat 5687.

I hope this helps

Best wishes,

Richard Gilbert
Bushey Heath, Hertfordshire

197721 - 197740 of 656311