Date   

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen About Cold Calls... #general

Yonatan Ben-David <YoniBenD@...>
 

Dear Corin,

If you have the time and inclination, could you post the best ideas and
tactics that you received on how to handle cold calls to strangers? I
know the moderator said that this thread is now closed, yet perhaps
he/she might allow the above-mentioned to appear here, as such
information could be useful to all of us. In fact, if assembled and
edited, these tips could make a practical info-file. Contacting
relatives who dont even know we exist is something that we all must do
many times...

Yonatan Ben-David
Tel Aviv

MODERATOR NOTE It is obvious that there is a need for an info -file
on cold calls. Yonatan Ben-David's comment is well taken. Perhaps
he would be willing to undertake the task of assembling all the
information. If so, we will reopen the thread just long enough to
post his announcement (grin). Deborah Dworski , whose message follows,
seems to have summed up most of the ideas previously posted and added
some of her own. Perhaps a collaboration is in order for such an
info-file?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Memory Book of Jewish Russian Soldiers 1941-1945 #general

K.& L. Bertelsen <klb@...>
 

Further to my recent message about this book, Ilya Zeldes has advised
me that this book is :

Kniga pamiati voinov-evreev pavshikh v boiakh s natsizmom : 1941-1945
/ [Redaktsionnaia Published: Moskva : [s.n.], 1994- Format: v. ; ill.
(some col.), ports. ; 27 cm.

Subject: World War, 1939-1945--Jews--Soviet Union--Registers of dead.

Other Name: Mar'ianovskii, M. F.

OCLC ID No.: 37127239

This book was found at the University of Illinois Library.

I also understand >from Dr. Saul Issroff and the Belarus SIG that
Stanford University has a copy, as follows :

Heading 1) Topic: Jewish Soldiers--Soviet Union--Registers
(1 citation) Citation 1.1

TITLE: Kniga pamiati voinov-evreev pavshikh v boiakh s natsizmom
1941- 1945 / [red. kol. M.F. Marianovskii, N.A. Pivovarova, I.S.
Sobol]. Gedenk

IMPRINT: Moskva : Soiuz Evreev Invalidov i Veteranov Voiny, 1995-
v. : ill. ; 27 cm.

LOCATION: Green Library Stacks D797 .S65 K56 1994 (Library has t.1-4)
OTHER: Marianovskii, M. F. Pivovarova, N. A.

Possibly it is also in some other large university or other libraries.

Please remove the ex >from my email address if you write to me.


Lorraine Bertelsen
Boho downunder
klb@...


About Cold Calls... #general

Yonatan Ben-David <YoniBenD@...>
 

Dear Corin,

If you have the time and inclination, could you post the best ideas and
tactics that you received on how to handle cold calls to strangers? I
know the moderator said that this thread is now closed, yet perhaps
he/she might allow the above-mentioned to appear here, as such
information could be useful to all of us. In fact, if assembled and
edited, these tips could make a practical info-file. Contacting
relatives who dont even know we exist is something that we all must do
many times...

Yonatan Ben-David
Tel Aviv

MODERATOR NOTE It is obvious that there is a need for an info -file
on cold calls. Yonatan Ben-David's comment is well taken. Perhaps
he would be willing to undertake the task of assembling all the
information. If so, we will reopen the thread just long enough to
post his announcement (grin). Deborah Dworski , whose message follows,
seems to have summed up most of the ideas previously posted and added
some of her own. Perhaps a collaboration is in order for such an
info-file?


Memory Book of Jewish Russian Soldiers 1941-1945 #general

K.& L. Bertelsen <klb@...>
 

Further to my recent message about this book, Ilya Zeldes has advised
me that this book is :

Kniga pamiati voinov-evreev pavshikh v boiakh s natsizmom : 1941-1945
/ [Redaktsionnaia Published: Moskva : [s.n.], 1994- Format: v. ; ill.
(some col.), ports. ; 27 cm.

Subject: World War, 1939-1945--Jews--Soviet Union--Registers of dead.

Other Name: Mar'ianovskii, M. F.

OCLC ID No.: 37127239

This book was found at the University of Illinois Library.

I also understand >from Dr. Saul Issroff and the Belarus SIG that
Stanford University has a copy, as follows :

Heading 1) Topic: Jewish Soldiers--Soviet Union--Registers
(1 citation) Citation 1.1

TITLE: Kniga pamiati voinov-evreev pavshikh v boiakh s natsizmom
1941- 1945 / [red. kol. M.F. Marianovskii, N.A. Pivovarova, I.S.
Sobol]. Gedenk

IMPRINT: Moskva : Soiuz Evreev Invalidov i Veteranov Voiny, 1995-
v. : ill. ; 27 cm.

LOCATION: Green Library Stacks D797 .S65 K56 1994 (Library has t.1-4)
OTHER: Marianovskii, M. F. Pivovarova, N. A.

Possibly it is also in some other large university or other libraries.

Please remove the ex >from my email address if you write to me.


Lorraine Bertelsen
Boho downunder
klb@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: cold-calling potential relatives #general

ddworski@...
 

Corin Goodwin wrote:
Here's my Problem for the Day:
I now have a short list of snail mail addresses or phone numbers for
people who are distantly related to me, or who might be. I have written
(snail mail) to one so far, and received no reply, even though I was
referred to her by my uncle, whom she knows. I have been in touch with
one other cousin by phone, but he was less than charming, and won't
reply to my emails either, even though he promised to send me quite a
bit of information (which he never did). I'm feeling a little gun-shy.
I know I should just go ahead and make some phone calls, since these
could be real, live relatives, or they could provide valuable leads, and
I also know that, in some cases, they may not be around for much longer,
but I can't help but feel a little afraid to intrude into people's
lives. Even the relatives I *do* know have been unwilling to discuss
genealogy or family history, so why should these folks who don't know me
at all?
Can anyone give me advice as to how to handle these kinds of phone
calls? How does one approach someone who has never heard of you and say,
"Hey, I think we're cousins!" or otherwise broach the subject?

I have read the many helpful comments submitted by fellow JewishGenners,
and I would like to add a few ideas:

1) Write first, even if you intend to follow up with a phone call.
There are several advantages to this approach.

--First, you will not catch the person "off guard." I think this can be
quite unsettling, especially for the elderly. In the U.S. we have a
problem of scam-artists calling the elderly with assorted, often
sophisticated, schemes to swindle them out of money. As a result, many
people are naturally suspicious of a complete stranger calling. If you
write in advance and establish minimal familiarity or at least a point of
reference, you have a better chance for a welcome reception.

--Second. By writing first, you are more likely to find a more
"prepared" caller. (Often, the recipient has actually phoned me, with
notes, documents, and thoughts organized.) At the very least, the person
has had a chance to mull over the topic at hand--not the case with a cold
call.

2) Include a self-addressed return post card with your correspondence.

--The emphasis here is on the notion of a post card. Perhaps it is
merely coincidence, but I have had no success with the self-addressed
stamped envelope strategy. My guess is that the obstacle is not the
postage, but rather people are too busy to sit down and write a letter
these days. Instead, I request that they simply scrawl a sentence or two
on the card (as to whether there might be a family connection) and list
the best times and methods for further contact with them (i.e., phone,
fax, day, evening). Of course, I also provide the various methods of
reaching me--including e-mail. Curiously, no one has actually returned
the post card, but everyone who received one has called me!

3) This sort of correspondence can be a bit intimidating, so be
understated and somewhat reserved.

--Do not assume that the recipient is the correct person, even if you are
99% certain. I always begin by expressing the hope that I have reached
the intended individual. (Provide enough identifying info. such as son
of, born in X country.) This strategy solves a number of potentially
awkward situations, including the death of the addressee. It is not
uncommon in the U.S. for an elderly woman to maintain her phone and
address listings in her deceased husband's name.

--No, do not say we are long-lost cousins! Again, such language raises
suspicions about your motivations. Keep it low-key and general. Profess
ignorance. Something rather innocuous such as "I would like to learn
more about your (surname) family history." Also, I find that people
become anxious if you demand specifics too quickly. Inevitably, they
believe they have no helpful information. So I make it clear that I am
starting with a virtual blank slate, even the most rudimentary
information, such as the first names of family members, will surely
assist my research. Since you are asking for something more basic than
they imagined, they become more confident and start talking. Soon they
are filling in blanks and solving family mysteries without even realizing
what they are doing!

I hope these strategies are able to help someone!

Sincerely,
Deborah Dworski
Arlington, Virginia U.S.A.

Perhaps you know a DWORSKI, GESBEN, LEVATINSKY, MINSKY, SCHEIBER,
SONNENBLUM?

MODERATOR NOTE Although this thread is closed, this and the previous
message were allowed. The moderator note ( after Yonatan Ben-David's
message) gives an explanation of the reason for temporarily reopening
the thread.


Re: cold-calling potential relatives #general

ddworski@...
 

Corin Goodwin wrote:
Here's my Problem for the Day:
I now have a short list of snail mail addresses or phone numbers for
people who are distantly related to me, or who might be. I have written
(snail mail) to one so far, and received no reply, even though I was
referred to her by my uncle, whom she knows. I have been in touch with
one other cousin by phone, but he was less than charming, and won't
reply to my emails either, even though he promised to send me quite a
bit of information (which he never did). I'm feeling a little gun-shy.
I know I should just go ahead and make some phone calls, since these
could be real, live relatives, or they could provide valuable leads, and
I also know that, in some cases, they may not be around for much longer,
but I can't help but feel a little afraid to intrude into people's
lives. Even the relatives I *do* know have been unwilling to discuss
genealogy or family history, so why should these folks who don't know me
at all?
Can anyone give me advice as to how to handle these kinds of phone
calls? How does one approach someone who has never heard of you and say,
"Hey, I think we're cousins!" or otherwise broach the subject?

I have read the many helpful comments submitted by fellow JewishGenners,
and I would like to add a few ideas:

1) Write first, even if you intend to follow up with a phone call.
There are several advantages to this approach.

--First, you will not catch the person "off guard." I think this can be
quite unsettling, especially for the elderly. In the U.S. we have a
problem of scam-artists calling the elderly with assorted, often
sophisticated, schemes to swindle them out of money. As a result, many
people are naturally suspicious of a complete stranger calling. If you
write in advance and establish minimal familiarity or at least a point of
reference, you have a better chance for a welcome reception.

--Second. By writing first, you are more likely to find a more
"prepared" caller. (Often, the recipient has actually phoned me, with
notes, documents, and thoughts organized.) At the very least, the person
has had a chance to mull over the topic at hand--not the case with a cold
call.

2) Include a self-addressed return post card with your correspondence.

--The emphasis here is on the notion of a post card. Perhaps it is
merely coincidence, but I have had no success with the self-addressed
stamped envelope strategy. My guess is that the obstacle is not the
postage, but rather people are too busy to sit down and write a letter
these days. Instead, I request that they simply scrawl a sentence or two
on the card (as to whether there might be a family connection) and list
the best times and methods for further contact with them (i.e., phone,
fax, day, evening). Of course, I also provide the various methods of
reaching me--including e-mail. Curiously, no one has actually returned
the post card, but everyone who received one has called me!

3) This sort of correspondence can be a bit intimidating, so be
understated and somewhat reserved.

--Do not assume that the recipient is the correct person, even if you are
99% certain. I always begin by expressing the hope that I have reached
the intended individual. (Provide enough identifying info. such as son
of, born in X country.) This strategy solves a number of potentially
awkward situations, including the death of the addressee. It is not
uncommon in the U.S. for an elderly woman to maintain her phone and
address listings in her deceased husband's name.

--No, do not say we are long-lost cousins! Again, such language raises
suspicions about your motivations. Keep it low-key and general. Profess
ignorance. Something rather innocuous such as "I would like to learn
more about your (surname) family history." Also, I find that people
become anxious if you demand specifics too quickly. Inevitably, they
believe they have no helpful information. So I make it clear that I am
starting with a virtual blank slate, even the most rudimentary
information, such as the first names of family members, will surely
assist my research. Since you are asking for something more basic than
they imagined, they become more confident and start talking. Soon they
are filling in blanks and solving family mysteries without even realizing
what they are doing!

I hope these strategies are able to help someone!

Sincerely,
Deborah Dworski
Arlington, Virginia U.S.A.

Perhaps you know a DWORSKI, GESBEN, LEVATINSKY, MINSKY, SCHEIBER,
SONNENBLUM?

MODERATOR NOTE Although this thread is closed, this and the previous
message were allowed. The moderator note ( after Yonatan Ben-David's
message) gives an explanation of the reason for temporarily reopening
the thread.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Crying over lost family. #general

Corinne Silver <corinnesilver@...>
 

I have received so many warm and caring emails in response to me
sharing my emotions at seeing family names on the Brest Getto Web site.
Thankyou for sharing your thoughts and emotions with me.
Suddenly as the mystery unravels about each name , and we find out
more about our ancestors, I guess they are no longer names and dates,
but we touch their lives, they almost "come alive".
An amusing story about my "flapper" grandmother driving a red sports
car round the streets of London provokes laughter and exileration.
In the same way as seeing family names on a getto list, when one can
only imagine the tiniest amout of the horror they were going through
provokes pain and tear and even mild trauma.
Thankyou one and all for sharing my journey of discovery with me.
I still have a lot more to find out and am pleased I found the Jewish
"genners" to do it with.


Crying over lost family. #general

Corinne Silver <corinnesilver@...>
 

I have received so many warm and caring emails in response to me
sharing my emotions at seeing family names on the Brest Getto Web site.
Thankyou for sharing your thoughts and emotions with me.
Suddenly as the mystery unravels about each name , and we find out
more about our ancestors, I guess they are no longer names and dates,
but we touch their lives, they almost "come alive".
An amusing story about my "flapper" grandmother driving a red sports
car round the streets of London provokes laughter and exileration.
In the same way as seeing family names on a getto list, when one can
only imagine the tiniest amout of the horror they were going through
provokes pain and tear and even mild trauma.
Thankyou one and all for sharing my journey of discovery with me.
I still have a lot more to find out and am pleased I found the Jewish
"genners" to do it with.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Vitebsk in Poland Pre-WW1? #belarus

Dr Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

In the recent biography of Sir Isiah Berlin by Micheal Ignatieff he
talks of Berlin being born in Vitebsk, part of Poland. Was Vitebsk pre -
WW1 ever part of Poland?

Saul Issroff
<saul@...>

Itzhak Epstein <Itzhak.Epstein@...> wrote:

Larry Gaum's comments below illustrate one of my main points. While I
advocate focusing on physical and especially social geography he relates to
"Polesie" as a political entity. It is true, as he says, that there was a
Polish gebernia by that name between the wars. It consisted of much of
the western part of greater Polesie -- together with parts of the Polish
gebernias to its north (Nowogrodek) and south (Volhynia). The larger
eastern part was in the Soviet republics of Ukraine and Byelorussia. I am
not aware of any pre-WWII non-Polish political entities by the name of
Polesie.


Vitebsk in Poland Pre-WW1? #belarus

Dr Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

In the recent biography of Sir Isiah Berlin by Micheal Ignatieff he
talks of Berlin being born in Vitebsk, part of Poland. Was Vitebsk pre -
WW1 ever part of Poland?

Saul Issroff
<saul@...>

Itzhak Epstein <Itzhak.Epstein@...> wrote:

Larry Gaum's comments below illustrate one of my main points. While I
advocate focusing on physical and especially social geography he relates to
"Polesie" as a political entity. It is true, as he says, that there was a
Polish gebernia by that name between the wars. It consisted of much of
the western part of greater Polesie -- together with parts of the Polish
gebernias to its north (Nowogrodek) and south (Volhynia). The larger
eastern part was in the Soviet republics of Ukraine and Byelorussia. I am
not aware of any pre-WWII non-Polish political entities by the name of
Polesie.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Motele Yizkor Books #belarus

Itzhak Epstein <Itzhak.Epstein@...>
 

You are right.

However, being the procrastinator that I am I have not started to work on
the Motele annotated bibliography that I had promised to several people.
Being The perfectionist that I am, I would not cite sloppily.

Nevertheless, The following information may do in the meantime:

Hayim Chemerinsky, aka Reb Mordechele was a very talented and enigmatic
person. During WWI he ended up In Yekatrinoslav working for the same
business as Alter Druyanov (a rather prominent Hebrew man of letters.)
Both were deeply aware of the rapid disappearance of the 19th century
shtetle and promised to describe their respective home towns in writing.
Shortly afterwards Chemerinsky was hospitalized with cancer and scribbled
his communal memoirs with a pencil in notebooks. The editing was done
after his death by others -- mostly Druyanov. Druyanov published them in
Odessa in 1919 in (the first or second issue of ) Reshumot -- his
ethnographic (?) periodical. My copy of 208 pages was republished by Dvir
in Tel Aviv in 5711 (about 1951 CE). While Chemerinsky had been an avid
Yiddishist and a prominent Yiddish writer for some time, these accounts
were written in Hebrew.

Hayah Weizmann-Lichtenstein's Betzel Koratenu, the first volume of her
memories, was published in 5708 (about 1948 CE) by Am Oved in Tel Aviv.
The first 76 of its 256 pages deal with Motele. The account then shifts to
Pinsk and elsewhere in Russia and ends at 2:20 PM on August 1921 as her
family crossed the Soviet border on the way to Eretz Yisrael.

The availability of both of these memories enables us to compare Rashamoon
like accounts of the same events -- not always in agreement. Then, we can
read Chaim Weizmann's accounts in trial and error (first published by
Harper &Brothers, New York in 1949 -- 498 pp.). We also have their mother
Rahel Leah's serialized interview with Jeanne Jaffe in Der Tog , a NYC
Yiddish paper in May 1938.

Please accept the above (not fully checked and edited) notes as an e-mail
message in response to an inquiry. Then, of course, you can wait for my
promised annotated bibliography.

Itzhak Epstein
<mailto:itzhak.epstein@...>


Stephen Kerlin wrote:
<< Chaim Chemerinsky, Weitzmann's first cousin once removed, in his 1917
deathbed memorir -- Ayarati Motele -- describes the business even better.>>
Robert Weiss wrote:
I have incomplete citations on two of the above, but would like the other
two.

1. Seepurah shel Motele (Recounting Motel), Shmuel Yarden, Jerusalem, Hebrew
2. Hurban Motele (The destruction of Motele), A. L. Poliak, Council of
Motele Imigrants, Jerusalem, 1957, 87pages, Hebrew


Re: Motele Yizkor Books #belarus

Itzhak Epstein <Itzhak.Epstein@...>
 

You are right.

However, being the procrastinator that I am I have not started to work on
the Motele annotated bibliography that I had promised to several people.
Being The perfectionist that I am, I would not cite sloppily.

Nevertheless, The following information may do in the meantime:

Hayim Chemerinsky, aka Reb Mordechele was a very talented and enigmatic
person. During WWI he ended up In Yekatrinoslav working for the same
business as Alter Druyanov (a rather prominent Hebrew man of letters.)
Both were deeply aware of the rapid disappearance of the 19th century
shtetle and promised to describe their respective home towns in writing.
Shortly afterwards Chemerinsky was hospitalized with cancer and scribbled
his communal memoirs with a pencil in notebooks. The editing was done
after his death by others -- mostly Druyanov. Druyanov published them in
Odessa in 1919 in (the first or second issue of ) Reshumot -- his
ethnographic (?) periodical. My copy of 208 pages was republished by Dvir
in Tel Aviv in 5711 (about 1951 CE). While Chemerinsky had been an avid
Yiddishist and a prominent Yiddish writer for some time, these accounts
were written in Hebrew.

Hayah Weizmann-Lichtenstein's Betzel Koratenu, the first volume of her
memories, was published in 5708 (about 1948 CE) by Am Oved in Tel Aviv.
The first 76 of its 256 pages deal with Motele. The account then shifts to
Pinsk and elsewhere in Russia and ends at 2:20 PM on August 1921 as her
family crossed the Soviet border on the way to Eretz Yisrael.

The availability of both of these memories enables us to compare Rashamoon
like accounts of the same events -- not always in agreement. Then, we can
read Chaim Weizmann's accounts in trial and error (first published by
Harper &Brothers, New York in 1949 -- 498 pp.). We also have their mother
Rahel Leah's serialized interview with Jeanne Jaffe in Der Tog , a NYC
Yiddish paper in May 1938.

Please accept the above (not fully checked and edited) notes as an e-mail
message in response to an inquiry. Then, of course, you can wait for my
promised annotated bibliography.

Itzhak Epstein
<mailto:itzhak.epstein@...>


Stephen Kerlin wrote:
<< Chaim Chemerinsky, Weitzmann's first cousin once removed, in his 1917
deathbed memorir -- Ayarati Motele -- describes the business even better.>>
Robert Weiss wrote:
I have incomplete citations on two of the above, but would like the other
two.

1. Seepurah shel Motele (Recounting Motel), Shmuel Yarden, Jerusalem, Hebrew
2. Hurban Motele (The destruction of Motele), A. L. Poliak, Council of
Motele Imigrants, Jerusalem, 1957, 87pages, Hebrew


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Original family name of Benyamin Netanyahu #general

Dick Plotz
 

Allan Fineberg asked:

For a research paper I'm working on, does anyone know the
original family name of Benyamin Netanyahu?
Bibi's father changed his name >from MILEIKOWSKY.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is now closed.
Any further comments, please send privately.


Original family name of Benyamin Netanyahu #general

Dick Plotz
 

Allan Fineberg asked:

For a research paper I'm working on, does anyone know the
original family name of Benyamin Netanyahu?
Bibi's father changed his name >from MILEIKOWSKY.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is now closed.
Any further comments, please send privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Social Security Question #general

WROZI <wrozi@...>
 

I don't know how the old files were, but I had my social security name changed
several times.

My original social security card had my given name, middle name and maiden
surname.name. I changed that when I marrried. That marriage ended and I kept
the married name. I had my re-married years later and again changed my social
security card to the newer married name. My social security number never
changed.

However, as for the drivers license; my first had my given name, middle name
was maiden surname, surname was my married name. After my second marriage,
the drivers license had my given name, for middle name - they used my first
married surname, and the surname is my last married name.

Then, as far as my checking account, the bank issued me new checks with the new
married name, but allowed me to use checks with the old married name - they
said they allow this knowing that it takes time to have all papers changed.
Therefore, I was allowed to use my personal checks with either name imprinted
on it. Go Figure.

So, I can understand why you will have problems in obtaining the correct names.
However, with all the marriages and re-marriages, I would think Social
Security would have the additional information added on to enable all concerned
to have access to the files and the correct changes.

Roslyn Goldman Downey
Winter park, FL


Re: Social Security Question #general

WROZI <wrozi@...>
 

I don't know how the old files were, but I had my social security name changed
several times.

My original social security card had my given name, middle name and maiden
surname.name. I changed that when I marrried. That marriage ended and I kept
the married name. I had my re-married years later and again changed my social
security card to the newer married name. My social security number never
changed.

However, as for the drivers license; my first had my given name, middle name
was maiden surname, surname was my married name. After my second marriage,
the drivers license had my given name, for middle name - they used my first
married surname, and the surname is my last married name.

Then, as far as my checking account, the bank issued me new checks with the new
married name, but allowed me to use checks with the old married name - they
said they allow this knowing that it takes time to have all papers changed.
Therefore, I was allowed to use my personal checks with either name imprinted
on it. Go Figure.

So, I can understand why you will have problems in obtaining the correct names.
However, with all the marriages and re-marriages, I would think Social
Security would have the additional information added on to enable all concerned
to have access to the files and the correct changes.

Roslyn Goldman Downey
Winter park, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Searching POSTBRIEF, Warszawa #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-01-09 00:46:21 EST, Shirley Flaum writes:

<< Does anyone know the origin of the surname POSTBRIEF, also spelled
POSTBRYF or POSTBRIF. Translated literally >from German, it means
"letter". I've never heard of this surname until today. This is the
surname of someone who probably perished in the Warsaw ghetto and was
married to my father's female first cousin named ROTBAIN. This family
were Chassidim. Thanks to anyone who can enlighten me. >>

==Some possibilities:

==an ancestor was a local postmaster or letter carrier, or a scribe who
would write letters (in German, probably) for the community members who
could write only Hebrew and Yiddish, or someone for whom a postal letter
was of great signicficance (a mail-order groom?) or someone who took the
name >from a pstage stamp for want of any better source

==perhaps a name picked in haste to sound German, to conceal the ancestor
>from authorities, czars, police, creditors, conscription, Nazis . . . .

==an ancestor filled in the wrong line of an official form and Postbrief
became the name >from then on--or the government clek copied the wrong line!

==The corruption of a place name--check out Postbrief in ShtetlSeeker, soundex

==My tendency is always to look at as many possibilities as possible, to
eliminate the improbable, and to look more closely at the most likely answers

Michael Bernet, New York

seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET, BERNERTH etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth; PODERATZKI: Paris, Nurnberg.
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF: Frankfurt (Aron Wolf m. Babette Goldschmidt ca 1860) also in
Wurzburg, also Sali WOLF, Rotterdam


Re: Searching POSTBRIEF, Warszawa #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-01-09 00:46:21 EST, Shirley Flaum writes:

<< Does anyone know the origin of the surname POSTBRIEF, also spelled
POSTBRYF or POSTBRIF. Translated literally >from German, it means
"letter". I've never heard of this surname until today. This is the
surname of someone who probably perished in the Warsaw ghetto and was
married to my father's female first cousin named ROTBAIN. This family
were Chassidim. Thanks to anyone who can enlighten me. >>

==Some possibilities:

==an ancestor was a local postmaster or letter carrier, or a scribe who
would write letters (in German, probably) for the community members who
could write only Hebrew and Yiddish, or someone for whom a postal letter
was of great signicficance (a mail-order groom?) or someone who took the
name >from a pstage stamp for want of any better source

==perhaps a name picked in haste to sound German, to conceal the ancestor
>from authorities, czars, police, creditors, conscription, Nazis . . . .

==an ancestor filled in the wrong line of an official form and Postbrief
became the name >from then on--or the government clek copied the wrong line!

==The corruption of a place name--check out Postbrief in ShtetlSeeker, soundex

==My tendency is always to look at as many possibilities as possible, to
eliminate the improbable, and to look more closely at the most likely answers

Michael Bernet, New York

seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET, BERNERTH etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth; PODERATZKI: Paris, Nurnberg.
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF: Frankfurt (Aron Wolf m. Babette Goldschmidt ca 1860) also in
Wurzburg, also Sali WOLF, Rotterdam


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Mormon Fam. Hist. Ctrs. in Israel #general

Yehuda Miklaf <mfritz@...>
 

I called the center here about a year ago and they told me that
they do not have a Family History Center here.
Yehuda Miklaf
Jerusalem
<mfritz@...>


Re: Mormon Fam. Hist. Ctrs. in Israel #general

Yehuda Miklaf <mfritz@...>
 

I called the center here about a year ago and they told me that
they do not have a Family History Center here.
Yehuda Miklaf
Jerusalem
<mfritz@...>