Date   
Re: KATZ, COHEN, BALABAN - Family name change to avoid the Czar's draft

Angie Elfassi
 

Hi Izzy et al,
My ggrandfather ne Mordechai KASSEMOFF, was, according to the Latvian archives, the son of Moshe Hirsch KASSEMOFF. When I looked at Mordechai's tombstone (buried in Leeds, UK) it said s/o Zeev/Wolf! This bothered me for a long time. I had contacted, years before, a person in Norway who told me that his family and mine were related. When I recontacted him, he told me that the surnames of several of the baby sons had been changed and that they were all the sons of Zeev! I believe that out of the three surnames, MOLVIDSON is the original name. The next son was GREENSTONE and finally ggrandfather Mordechai KASSEMOFF, all from Rezekne, Latvia.
Regards
Angie Elfassi
Israel

 
KATZ, COHEN, BALABAN - Family name change to avoid the Czar's draft
From: cohen.izzy@...
Date: Sun, 19 Jan 2020 11:28:41 EST

There was a period of time when first-born sons were exempt from Russian army service. Families past child-bearing age who had no sons would officially claim a Jewish neighbor's draftable son as their own first-born. 

As a result, all Russian empire records for such "adopted" sons had the family name of the adopting family. I understand that this is how Shia Balaban z"l from Odessa, Ukraine acquired his family name. He was the brother of the aunt by marriage of my aunt by marriage. He died in BeerSheva during the 2nd week of the Yom Kippur War while I was at Etzion airbase (Bikat haYarai'akh) in Sinai. His widow Klara Balaban died several years later. They had no living children. 

Re: Tracking a passenger across the Atlantic through England #liverpool

Deanna Levinsky
 

I know my grandmother and three children came (somehow) from Nezhin , Ukraine to Liverpool, to Glasgow and as a pregnant widow, to New York USA. This was in December 1907. 
DEANNA LEVINSKY 
Long Island, New York 
Searching- Rifkin, Schafferenko, Slonimski 

--
Deanna M. Levinsky, Long Island, NY

Re: Buying false papers

Sally Bruckheimer
 

"In passing, let me mention that none of the claims made against the involuntary name-changes narratives stands up to scrutiny and that I have identified a mechanism that would lead immigrants to believe their name(s) had been changed involuntarily by the immigration process."

In spite of what is said here, there were no documents needed to enter the US before WW I, and no names were used at Ellis Island. People there had tags around their necks with the page number and line number of the passenger list. This has been stated repeatedly by the ICE (formerly INS) experts. 

Men in steerage had to appear healthy and able to work, women had to have a husband or father who could support them, and children had to have parents who could support them. People who did not meet these requirements were returned to Europe at the ship-owner's expense, but could later come in a cabin class with no questions asked.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

Re: Maiming to Avoid the Russian Draft?

Jack Berger
 

I confirm Boris, comment on the error in the original message.

The original initiation of maiming came about as a result of  ukase issued by Czar Nicholas I pejoratively known as “Fonyeh Goniff” by Jews. That ukase ordered that every third Jewish child, when reaching the age of 12 would be forcibly impressed into the Russian Army for 25 years. The objective was to diminish and ultimately assimilate the Jews, causing them to disappear.

History shows that this failed on both counts. Many of the Yizkor Books I have translated make reference to “Nikolaievsky” soldiers that returned to their home towns after 25 years.

The death of Czar Nicholas I resulted in the weakening and eventual abandonment of the ukase.

This sort of unprofessional persiflage is why I place no faith in, and have no credibility regarding anything I see in this thread.

also: the e-mail service itself is execrable.

JSB

Re: Auto-signing messages

Sarah L Meyer
 

Thank you.  I tried it now lets see if it works

Re: Maiming to Avoid the Russian Draft?

Kenneth Packer
 

I think many of us with family from Russia have stories like this.  My Great Uncle, Aaron Packer, was born in Russia near Kiev and left Russia in 1917 as a result of the Russian Revolution.  He punctured his eardrum to become deaf and avoid being drafted into the Russian Army - one of many harrowing stories in his life.
Ken Packer
Washingtonville, NY

Re: Maiming to Avoid the Russian Draft?

mlustig2@...
 

My maternal grandfather was sent to the front in the Russo-Japanese War where conditions were beyond terrible for Jews.  He shot off the top of his pinkie finger so he could return to his wife and family.  Once home though, he soon left to immigrate to the US.  His family followed soon afterwards.

 

My paternal uncle changed his name to come to the U.S. to avoid being drafted.  He was only 14.  My father left when he was 16.  I can hardly imagine what it must have been like to travel so far alone at such young ages.  It had to be horrible for their mother, especially since the boys’ father had died many years before.  Clearly such behavior was done to preserve their lives and freedom.

 

 

 

 

Re: Tracking a passenger across the Atlantic through England #liverpool

rv Kaplan
 

And another port on the west coast for onward migration to USA etc was Glasgow, Scotland.

I have traced the emigration of my great great grandparents, Hirsch Fayn (Harry Fine) and his wife Bune, from Lithuania in November, 1902.  They are listed in the Hamburg passengers lists  (under Fein!) leaving Hamburg on 21 November 1902 on the Lutterworth, a ship of the Hamburg-Amerika Line, and sailed to Grimsby.  From there, they would have continued on by train to Glasgow, where some of their children lived.   Tragically, Bune Fayn died on 11 December 1902, less than three weeks after arriving in Glasgow.  Her death certificate attributes her death to pneumonia, which may have been caused (or at least aggravated) by the 32-hour journey the previous month across the North Sea from Hamburg to Grimsby.  Perhaps Bune had been ill already, and aged 62, at that time she was already an old lady.  


Harvey Kaplan

Glasgow


KAPLAN, FAYN, FEIN, FINE, BARSD, GRADMAN

- Ariogala, Josvainiai, Kedainiai, Krakes, Seta, Veliuona, Grinkiskis, Lithuania

FELMAN, MILER, ROSENBLOOM - Kamenets-Podolsk, Shatava, Balyn, Ukraine

TROPP, STORCH - Kolbuszowa, Cmolas,Galicia

LINDERMAN, LINDEMAN, LOPATKA, SCHLACKMAN – Kutno and  Plock, Poland


On Sun, 19 Jan 2020 at 16:30, Roberta Sheps via Groups.Jewishgen.Org <rsheps=ntlworld.com@...> wrote:
Another port on the east coast was Grimsby.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, UK

Re: New format of website - is this a problem or just something I don't know??

Martha Forsyth
 

Thanks, Deborah, and others who have replied.  Between your messages and my own trials, I had actually figured this out shortly after I sent it! but didn't know how to stop it.

Martha Forsyth
Newton, MA

On Jan 19, 2020 10:00 AM, Deborah Blankenberg <dtblankenberg@...> wrote:
Hi, Martha. I'm looking at this on an Android smartphone, so it might appear slightly differently on your device or computer, but when i touched the Reply link under your original message, a form opened for me to type my reply. Underneath, there are three buttons: Reply to Group & Sender, Discard, and Private. That third option should send your reply to the original poster only. 
--
Deborah Blankenberg (JewishGen ID #613395)
Lodi, CA
dtblankenberg@... 
Researching BLOCH/BLOCK (Germany to New York, Colombia and Missouri), BLINDER (Kishinev to New York via Poland? and Paris), KUSHER/KUSZER (Lodz vicinity to New York via Paris), GOLDSCHMIDT (Germany)

False papers for Russian Army deserters

Evelyn Fabrikant
 

My father and his brother escaped from a labor train leaving the Sarny - now Ukraine- killing field in 1942
they hoped to find the Polish underground but the Russian army found them and they were in scripted
they deserted sometime in early 1945 and found forgers in Sosnovitz Poland - but never actually received the false documents
My father met my mother who was altering clothing for the forgers and working in their apartment- he convinced her to leave with him - along with her sister and the one son she saved - and they fled without legal documents from sosnovitz across Europe and the Alps to Italy
i learned that he bought “quota” to secure visas to US
i am curious to know if anyone has more information about this
evelyn Fabrikant- Medwed Weisbrot Goldman Lichstein 
 

Re: Pale of Settlement

jbonline1111@...
 

One of my grandfathers listed his origin as Poland though he came from this area.  Later, he called it Russia on his naturalization papers.  
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC

Re: Auto-signing messages

jbonline1111@...
 

thanks to both of you.  Solved my problem with forgetting to sign my messages.
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC

Re: Reply to Re: Maiming to Avoid the Russian Draft?

assaf.patir@...
 

I recommend Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern's excellent article about the subject at YIVO:

https://yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Military_Service_in_Russia

Re: Tracking a passenger across the Atlantic through England #liverpool

Roberta Sheps
 

Another port on the east coast was Grimsby.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, UK

MAZURENKO/MOSER/MAYER/MAZOUR

Felissa Lashley
 

My great great grandfather was known as Avrum MAYER in the Ukraine.
His son apparently had two names: Herschel MAYER and Grigorii
MAZURENKO. Would anyone know why this ancestor would use both a
Russian name and their original name? Was that common? A vague family story said he was a horticulturist and may have managed a cherry orchard for the czar near Gorodische or Valyava, both in the Cherkassy section of the Ukraine. Hershel's son
was known as Anatole MAZOUR (deceased) who came to the U.S. as Abraham
Moser and became a well known Russian scholar. Anatole had a brother
Mikhail MAZURENKO and a sister whose name is unknown. This sister apparently went with her husband who was banished to siberia but who was back in the Ukraine in the late 1970s  I am trying to
find information about these siblings as well if anyone has any ideas.
I appreciate any help. This group has been wonderful in providing
information and I am very grateful.

Thank you.

Felissa Lashley
Austin, Texas

KATZ, COHEN, BALABAN - Family name change to avoid the Czar's draft

cohen.izzy@...
 

There was a period of time when first-born sons were exempt from Russian army service. Families past child-bearing age who had no sons would officially claim a Jewish neighbor's draftable son as their own first-born. 

As a result, all Russian empire records for such "adopted" sons had the family name of the adopting family. I understand that this is how Shia Balaban z"l from Odessa, Ukraine acquired his family name. He was the brother of the aunt by marriage of my aunt by marriage. He died in BeerSheva during the 2nd week of the Yom Kippur War while I was at Etzion airbase (Bikat haYarai'akh) in Sinai. His widow Klara Balaban died several years later. They had no living children. 

Re: Pale of Settlement

assaf.patir@...
 

The Yiddish term would be: דער תחום המושב, pronounced: Der t'hum ha-moy-shəv (from Hebrew תחום המושב)

Re: Once upon a time there was a moderator for this group.....

Avraham Groll
 

Dear Friends,

Thank you for everyone’s comments and suggestions as we continue to improve the JewishGen Discussion Group. 

We appreciate your feedback, and will take it seriously. 

A number of staff, volunteers, moderators and members will analyze the issues raised in detail, and we will aim to followup again before the end of the month.

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Executive Director
JewishGen.org
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Executive Director

JewishGen.org

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Re: New format of website - is this a problem or just something I don't know??

Deborah Blankenberg
 

Hi, Martha. I'm looking at this on an Android smartphone, so it might appear slightly differently on your device or computer, but when i touched the Reply link under your original message, a form opened for me to type my reply. Underneath, there are three buttons: Reply to Group & Sender, Discard, and Private. That third option should send your reply to the original poster only. 
--
Deborah Blankenberg (JewishGen ID #613395)
Lodi, CA
dtblankenberg@... 
Researching BLOCH/BLOCK (Germany to New York, Colombia and Missouri), BLINDER (Kishinev to New York via Poland? and Paris), KUSHER/KUSZER (Lodz vicinity to New York via Paris), GOLDSCHMIDT (Germany)

Finding researchers

Bob Silverstein
 

How can I find researcher for whom I have a name and researcher code?