Date   

help with translation please #translation

Barry Yunes
 


Subject: help with translation please

Could someone help me translate this stone please? I am looking for the parents names for Ida here. (or any geneology help)
Thanks in advance! 
Barry Yunes
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Re: Identifying where an ancestor is from #russia #ukraine #romania

Alan Shuchat
 

It's hard to answer without knowing more details, but here is an example. My grandmother was born in Soroki when it was in the Bessarabia gubernia (governorate) of the Russian Empire. When she came to the United States she entered under the Romanian quota, because Soroki had become part of the Kingdom of Romania. Later Soroki was in the Moldavian SSR and it is now in Moldova. So she could have answered "Where were you born?" or "Where did you live?" in many ways.
--
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA


Re: How to find UKRAINE birth and marriage records #ukraine #records #russia

BobRosenthal
 

Does anyone know of any records for Novo Ushitser, Ukraine or surrounding towns? My maternal father's family is from there. Names are Swerlick: Solomon (1905-1990), Herman (1910 to 1995), Irene (1907 TO 1911), and Evelyn (1919 to ?). all born between 1905 and 1920. I have no maternal maiden names but Solomon, et. al.'s parents were Simon (1881-1963) and Gertrude (1883 - 1938). Simon's parents were David (?-?) and Ruchel (1815-?). And that's as far back as I can go.

Bob Rosenthal


uman birth records #russia #ukraine

lynnralphie@...
 

Date: Tue, 29 Sep 2020 13:05:25 -0700
Subject: Uman Ukraine records #records #ukraine #russia
I have not been able to locate the Birth records for my grandmother and her sisters. Family name us Nissengold.
first names Sarah, Puia and Chana.
Their dad Eliezer Nissengold died there in 1915 and I'd like to know which cemetary.  All in Uman.

Linda Elkins
lynnralphie@...


Re: How to find UKRAINE birth and marriage records #ukraine #records #russia

Ellen Garshick
 

Hi Joel,
Our group has already translated all of the Revision List records for Radzivilov that Alex Krakovsky has posted. You can search these at https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/web-pages/database/krem_search_frm.html
All the records are indexed there. Records that have been proofed are fully posted at JRI-Poland.
-- 
Ellen Garshick
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
an activity of the Kremenets District Research Group
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets
Researching BAT, AVERBAKH from Kremenets, Shumsk, Katerburg, and Folvarki, Ukraine; GERSHIK, HURWITCH from Staryye Dorogi and Bobruisk, Belarus; ROTHKOPF (ROTKOP), GOLDBERG from Bialystok, Poland, and Baranivichi and Slonim, Belarus


Re: How to find UKRAINE birth and marriage records - Kitai Family in Zdolbunow and Rovno #ukraine #records #russia

Ellen Garshick
 

The name Kitai shows up about 140 times in records indexed for the Kremenets district, not far from Rovno. You can search our records at https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/web-pages/database/krem_search_frm.html.
If you find anything of interest, let me know.

-- 
Ellen Garshick
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
an activity of the Kremenets District Research Group
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets
Researching BAT, AVERBAKH from Kremenets, Shumsk, Katerburg, and Folvarki, Ukraine; GERSHIK, HURWITCH from Staryye Dorogi and Bobruisk, Belarus; ROTHKOPF (ROTKOP), GOLDBERG from Bialystok, Poland, and Baranivichi and Slonim, Belarus


Re: Yiddish surnames related to 'Morrison' #ukraine #names

Dcmeerson@...
 

My paternal grandfather was born in Odessa in 1876. Around 1900 he transliterated his surname from Cyrillic MEEPCOH to Roman MEERSON, and remained Michael Meerson for the rest of his long life. Sometimes when I spell my surname to English speakers they write "Merrison" because a double r comes more naturally than a double e and I often have to spell it twice. From "Merrison " to "Morrison" is not a stretch.
Daniel Meerson
Thetford, VT


Re: Need suggestions for how to search for misspelled family names #records

David Brostoff
 

On Sep 28, 2020, at 9:58 PM, Dahn Cukier via groups.jewishgen.org <photograve99=yahoo.com@...> wrote:

Then I found on his daughter-in-law's naturalization papers that her
husband (my grandfather) was naturalized on (date) and the
number was xxxxx. After not finding anything indexed on
FamilySearch or Ancestry, I found that one of these have unindexed
records. I went courthouse to courthouse (via internet)
Where are these records accessible?

Thank you,

David Brostoff


Re: Seeking Advice for Hiring the Best Latvian Researcher #latvia

Rosalind Finkelstein
 

I had my family researched by the State Archives about 14 years ago.  I even picked up my results in person at the Archives office in Riga.  Recently I found out that my father had another sister who was not mentioned in the report.  Likewise I also learned that my grandfather had more siblings than the Archives mentioned.  Of course this was a while ago and hopefully they are doing a better job now with modern technology.  The benefit of dealing with the Archives is that they have set rates.  None the less I feel safe having them do my research.
Rosalind Finkelstein
Framingham,MA
hairgone@...


Re: Need suggestions for how to search for misspelled family names #records

Laurie Sosna
 

My favorite game of phonetic whack-a-mole. Here are some things I've used.

Anna and Belle KOBB immigration at Ellis Island. Could not find it using existing Ellis Island search engine in 2010.
Using stevemorse.org:
Searched with first initial of LAST NAME (K) plus town "sounds like" Wilkomir.
Found manifest: Henschel and Beile KABE (phonetic spelling) 1911
Sons:
Nussen KARP 1912
Judel KARP (penciled in correction from traveling companion Friedsohn) 1913
Pinkus & Abram KAP 1922

1930 Census record for Phil KOBB. Knew where he was living, could not find the record.
Ancestry.com: Used first names only and approximate birth year: Phillip (1902), Helen, son Leo. State: New York.
Found indexed as ROBB. "K" in the census taker's handwriting looked like an "R"

Immigration manifest for Herbert & Sylvia SOSNA 1914. Brought to the U.S. by their father Benjamin.
Did not know their old country names.
I think I used stevemorse.org, maybe ancestry.
Another case of a handwriting problem. I used asterisk instead of first initial of last name *osna
Immigration officer wrote cursive S that looks exactly like a cursive L. Indexed as "LOSNA."

I sometimes only put in a "sounds like" town name and a date range and sift through the results.

Time is another factor. Records are indexed at the whim of the site where they are located.
Morris Pell naturalization. Family arrived in January 1910 as Papelewskim home town Ivanifka.
Variations on different documents: Popelowsky, Popelousky, Papelewski.
I started locating records for him and his family (his wife is a Sosna) in 2014 using their adopted name and many, many, many variations of their original last name and home town.
His 1920 census says he was naturalized in 1919.
I doggedly kept checking back on ancestry and familysearch (they are my two favorite sites.)
Bupkis.
July 1, 2020 I tried again, on familysearch: Popelowsky and date range 1910-1919
There he was. Morris Popolowsky.
Declaration in 1914, petition in 1916, declined in 1917 (one of his witnesses didn't know him for the full 5 years) and granted in 1919.

Depending on the record, the transcriber, translator, age or place of origin, they vary wildly.
Wild card searches won't work, the spellings are just too variable. "Sounds like" is the only option.
FRIEDSON/KOBB from Wilkomir:
I maintain a list of the ways the name FRIEDSON has been spelled, current count is 24, including regional variations.
In Lithuanian records, for example, I found FREDZONAIT and FREDZONAS.
KOBB has a Lithuanian variations: KAPAS, KAPIENE.

Wanna guess how many ways you can spell Judelevitz? Luckily, they shortened it to Levitz, before two of them changed it to Levitt. (Thanks guys).
Or the Sosna who changed it to Susner during naturalization and used that spelling on her father's death certificate which confused me for 5 years, but his headstone says Sosna? Nice.

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco, CA

SOSNA, HOCHMAN, LEVIN, GOLDBLOOM, KOBB, FRIEDSON, LEVITZ
Ivonifka, Ukraine; Rashkov, Ukraine; Mogilev-Podolsky, Ukraine, Vilna, Lithuania; Wilkomir (Ukmerge) Lithainia, Dnipropetrovsk (Yekaternislav), Ukraine; Ostrowiec, Poland
New Jersey, New York, Massachussetts, Connecticut, London, Los Angeles, Montreal, Cleveland.


How to find UKRAINE birth and marriage records #ukraine #records #russia

Ruth
 

I’m not sure how to send messages. Hope this works.
Ruth



Are there any revision lists for Bershad or Ladyzhyn, Vinnitsa (spouse’s family) or for Genichesk, Kerson (my family)? My husband’s grandfather Aaron SHKOLNIK left Ukraine for Canada in 1909; my grandfather Rachel TSCHERNIA left for Denmark in 1904. I have lots of information once they arrived in their destination countries but virtually none from pre-emigration. Thank you #ukraine #russia #records


Ruth Chernia
Toronto, Canada
searching for
TSCHERNIA of Copenhagen, Denmark, & Genichesk, Kherson Oblast, Ukraine
SHLAMOWITZ/SZLAMOWICZ/LANDAU of London, England, Lodz & Jezow, Poland
SEIDLER/ZAJDLER/BIRENCWEIG of Lodz & Sulejow, Poland
ROSENFELD of Raków, Kielce, Poland
SHKOLNIK/TICKER of Ladyzhyn & Bershad, Vinnytsia, Ukraine





--
Ruth Chernia
Toronto, Canada
searching for
TSCHERNIA of Copenhagen, Denmark, & Genichesk, Kherson Oblast, Ukraine
SHLAMOWITZ/SZLAMOWICZ/BIRENCWEIG of London, England; Lodz & Jezow, Poland
SEIDLER/ZAJDLER/LANDAU of Lodz & Sulejow, Poland
ROSENFELD of Raków, Kielce, Poland
SHKOLNIK/TICK[ER] of Ladyzhyn & Bershad, Vinnytsia, Ukraine


How to find UKRAINE birth and marriage records #ukraine #records #russia

Ruth
 

Are there any revision lists for Bershad or Ladyzhyn, Vinnitsa (spouse’s family) or for Genichesk, Kerson (my family)? My husband’s grandfather Aaron SHKOLNIK left Ukraine for Canada in 1909; my grandfather Rachel TSCHERNIA left for Denmark in 1904. I have lots of information once they arrived in their destination countries but virtually none from pre-emigration. Thank you #ukraine #russia #records


Ruth Chernia
Toronto, Canada
searching for
TSCHERNIA of Copenhagen, Denmark, & Genichesk, Kherson Oblast, Ukraine
SHLAMOWITZ/SZLAMOWICZ/LANDAU of London, England, Lodz & Jezow, Poland
SEIDLER/ZAJDLER/BIRENCWEIG of Lodz & Sulejow, Poland
ROSENFELD of Raków, Kielce, Poland
SHKOLNIK/TICKER of Ladyzhyn & Bershad, Vinnytsia, Ukraine
--
Ruth Chernia
Toronto, Canada
searching for
TSCHERNIA of Copenhagen, Denmark, & Genichesk, Kherson Oblast, Ukraine
SHLAMOWITZ/SZLAMOWICZ/BIRENCWEIG of London, England; Lodz & Jezow, Poland
SEIDLER/ZAJDLER/LANDAU of Lodz & Sulejow, Poland
ROSENFELD of Raków, Kielce, Poland
SHKOLNIK/TICK[ER] of Ladyzhyn & Bershad, Vinnytsia, Ukraine


Re: Archives of Ukraine #general #records #ukraine

Gary Pokrassa
 

Ilya
yes very important thank you

We have just such a project underway - it is a massive undertaking and we are exploring the best way to get what we have completed posted online with periodic updates.  
Gary Pokrassa 
Data Acquisition Director 
Ukraine Research Group


Re: Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Radomsk Family Tree #rabbinic

nbyaros
 

HI Moishe, did you get a response to your message of 8/28/06 on a family tree of the Radomsk dynasty? I would like the same. Thanks


Re: Require help in understanding items on the attached New York marriage certificate #records

Kate Dresdner
 

For the bride’s two given names, the given name on the record was likely spoken to the registrar or officiant and is spelled phonetically. The spelling of the given name on the bride’s signatory line was likely to have been written by Emma herself. For further research I would search using the two given names and the American name. This extra work is annoying of course but being through may lead to more records that include more information. 

For the information entered in place of the number of marriages, the recorder was being through. NYC would have had thousands of people that had the exact same names as someone else living in NYC and their parents names would be similar or the same as someone else as well. The groom’s name, Jacob Wagner, is incredibly common. The address of the groom’s parents would aid in separating one Jacob Wagner from another, when the need inevitably arose. The recorder took the extra space to write the addresses of the parents. There is no need to list zero marriages, since they were both listed as single, rather than widowed or divorced. 

Kate Dresdner


Re: Looking for Chune Rosen from Zhitomir , Brooklyn and Massachusetts #usa

Molly Staub
 

I'm not sure I can answer your question, but I have a large family group from Zhitomir. I didn't see your email address; please email me at staubmolly@...

Molly Staub


Re: Do you know this location? #lithuania

Sherri Bobish
 


Richard,

Try searching Kaunas here:  https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp

Next step is to look at the towns listed on the Kaunas page as being within a 30 mile radius.  Hopefully you will find “Gizejikanis” there.

Be sure to look at the town name variants on the page of any town that may be a possibility.  Most towns had several different names in various languages, and some variants can be quite different than one would expect.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Researcher in Belarus #belarus

fjs@...
 

Dear Rich (if I may),

 An Apostille is, essentially an internationally accepted form of notarisation. Since different states and countries require various levels of authentication for notarisation Apostilles provide an international standard of validation which is accepted by the 118 countries to the Hague Conference on Private International Law. In the United States Apostilles are usually issued by the Secretary of State’s office of each state. As you are in Maryland I suggest that you view https://www.peoples-law.org/maryland-apostille-and-full-legalization-process-authenticating-maryland-documents-use-across [https://tinyurl.com/y25j7uer].

As a word of warning: there are on the internet many Apostille ‘services’ which promise to undertake the process of obtaining an Apostille for you--at obscenely high prices. I suggest you avoid them. Obtaining an Apostille is a reasonably simple process. which you can easily and inexpensively do yourself. I would also beware of any private researcher who says you can avoid providing an Apostille. Apart from the fact that research without one will be illegal the researcher will be limited in access to relevant documents.

An Apostille is not required if you deal directly with the Archive.

If you feel I can be of any further help please feel free to email me.

Best regards,

Frank Swartz


Re: Identifying where an ancestor is from #russia #ukraine #romania

Rx1500mg@...
 

Both of my grandmother's had the same residency that you mention.  They were from Russia but their next stop in traveling was Bucharest, Romania. They listed that as there last known address. Your ancestor was not confused. They  were answering literally their LAST place they had stayed, not their original residence or country of origin.

rx1500mg@...    Steven Wohlstetter


JGSCT October 18, 2020 Webinar, The Krakovsky Documents: JewishGen's Ukraine Research Division Project, with Joel Spector #ukraine #records #announcements

gkr
 

On October 18, 2020, at 1:30 pm, genealogist Joel Spector will virtually present “The Krakovsky Documents: JewishGen's Ukraine Research Division Project: Transliteration, Preservation, and Addition of the Data to JewishGen For Genealogical Researchers" via webinar.

Alex Krakovsky, a Ukrainian Jew, has been scanning metrical and census records found in long-closed Ukrainian archives. He has placed the indexes, in Cyrillic, on a webpage for easy access. The current Metrical Records Project’s purpose is to transliterate and make the data available on JewishGen for researchers.


A Past President of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia, Joel Spector has also been chairperson of its Russian Special Interest Group. Joel is a former Secretary of the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) and now serves as its Archivist. Currently, he is a member of the JewishGen Ukraine Research Division and serves as its Director of Metrical Records Projects.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut welcomes everyone interested in Jewish genealogy to our webinar presentation.

This webinar is free and open to the public.


To register for this webinar, click on the following URL:


https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5251972729603187214


Gail K Reynolds, Publicity Chair, Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut