Date   
Belarus SIG #Belarus unusual first names, elche #Belarus

Esther Buchsbaum <estherrb@...>
 

I seem to have missed the beginning of a discussion about unusual
first names.

One of the names mentioned was Elche. My great great grandmother,
from Joniskelis, Lithuania was named Elke, which sounds the same.
Numerous grandaughters and great grandaughters in my Sevelovitz
family have been named Esther. My thought was that Elke may have been
a currently popular name that started with the Eh sound, which
was used much as we might name a child born today Michael for a
grandfather named Moshe. Thoughts ?

Esther Buchsbaum, Tybee island , Ga.
MODERATOR'S NOTE: The original post can be found in the Belarus Digest of June 11, 2007.

Belarus SIG #Belarus Unusual first names, germanic names #Belarus

Esther Buchsbaum <estherrb@...>
 

Also in reply to another writer, I have read that German names were
considered more prestigious than Russian names, so that when Jews
were forced by law to assume a last name other than "ben david,"
for example, they chose a Germanic name. My maiden name was
Rosenbaum, and my husband's name is Buchsbaum. I can trace the
Rosenbaums back no further than Horodetz, Belorusse, and the Buchsbaums
to Limanova, Poland (then Gallicia, and part of the Austo-Hungarian
Empire.)

Esther Rosenbaum Buchsbaum
Tybee island, Ga.

Belarus SIG #Belarus Unusual first names #Belarus

Vladimir Salita <vlasal@...>
 

Jews acquired German names in Austria and Prussia about the end of 18th
century and after several partition of Poland they had found themselves in
Russia with already gotten German names. Some of names were russified or
translated.

Vladimir Salita
Bowie. MD
vlasal@...

Belarus SIG #Belarus Unusual first names #Belarus

les evenchick
 

In my family >from Koidanov(23km sw Minsk) 2 unusual to
me names appeared - These were Morduk and Girsh.

Investigating these turned up that Girsh was the
Russian equivalent of Hirsh meaning deer. Later
descendants named after Girsh became Hershall and
Harry.

The apparently Russian Morduk was associated with
Mordecai which became Morris.

Are these name connections generally correct or just
used in my family?

Les Evenchick
New Orleans,La

Searching: EVENCHICK, EVENCHIK, AVIN, CHERCHES,
CHARKES

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: unusual first names #Belarus

Roberta Newman <rnewman12@...>
 

Annette Stolberg writes:

The family had a German sounding name, EHRLICHMAN, but I
suspect that they had always lived in the Ukraine despite the German
surname. I think that I read that Jews took on German sounding
surnames in the Russian Empire, but I don't know how this tradition
came about. Does anyone know how far back this custom went and why?


There are many names, like Ehrlichman, which are common to both German and
Yiddish. Some Yiddish words are the same or similar to German words. Since
Yiddish was the everyday language of Jews in the Russian Empire and also in
parts of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Ehrlichman would not be an unusual
name for a Ukrainian Jew. If the family lived in the Western part of
presentday Ukraine, then it is also possible that they adopted their surname
under Austro-Hungarian rule, that is, a German-speaking regime. Hope this is
helpful!

Roberta Newman
rnewman12@...
New York, NY

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Unusual first names -Morduk #Belarus

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

Dear Les et al:

These are not at all unfamiliar names to me, which suggests strongly they are
not in the least peculiar pairings. If I had a shekel for every Girsh/Harry,
and I have definitely seen Morduk(Marduk)/Mordechais. That one struck me
especially as it is an extremely ancient name: a major god of Mesopotamia. I
can't recall Marduk's exact attributes. It has always struck me as a
fascinating piece of continuity, as well as ironic.

You can see a very brief article at:
http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9050829/Marduk
Or if you like Wikipedia there's a much longer article.

Best,
Michelle Frager
NYC area
FRAKT WOLFSON etc. DINABURSKY KLAVIR in Belarus


--- les evenchick <piratefish@...> wrote:.................
In my family >from Koidanov(23km sw Minsk) 2 unusual to
me names appeared - These were Morduk and Girsh.

The apparently Russian Morduk was associated with
Mordecai which became Morris.

Are these name connections generally correct or just
used in my family?

Les Evenchick
New Orleans,La






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Belarus SIG #Belarus Another unusual name - maybe, Shimeh Hesheh #Belarus

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

This is a question I've posed before, but so much time has passed that perhaps
there are new members who might be able to help.

Is there a name "Shimeh Hesheh"? Spelled phonetically. Male? Female? I seem to
recall it >from my childhood but my oldest cousin - now the patriarch and
American-born - doesn't recognize it.

Any help would be enormously appreciated!

Michelle Frager
NYC area
Belarus: FRAKT WOLFSON etc. LIFSCHITZ DINABURSKY KLAVIR



____________________________________________________________________________________

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: German sounding names #Belarus

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Yiddish is mostly German written in Hebrew letters, so Jews often took
German sounding surnames even in non-German areas. EHRLICHMAN and
RUSLANDER (one of my names) and lots more are Yiddish in origin.

And, of course, your family didn't always live in Ukraine (or Belarus
for others in the Belarus SIG), since Jews only went there in the late
middle ages. Before that, they lived somewhere in what was a
German-speaking area, as they took their everyday language with them
to the east.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Unusual First Name-Girm #Belarus

Christine Usdin <christineusd@...>
 

Subject: unusual first names.Girm
From:Christine Usdin
christineusd@...

In the fund documents of the 1875 census of Latvia,there is an information
stating that lived:
Usdin GIRM(ALSO GIRSH).

What's about the first name NOSON?
Thanks
Christine Usdin
France

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Another unusual name - maybe, Shimeh Hesheh #Belarus

joyweave
 

Hi Michelle--

Given a Yiddish accent, I'd venture a guess at Shimon Hersch for that one.

Joy Weaver
East Islip, NY USA

Michelle Frager wrote:

Is there a name "Shimeh Hesheh"? Spelled phonetically. Male? Female?

Any help would be enormously appreciated!

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Unusual first names -Morduk #Belarus

joyweave
 

One more comment on Mordechai-- I've seen this name frequently on Ellis
Island lists appearing as Mordche. In a couple of cases, when I thought
the man might be a relative, I've tried tracking him in the next census
and both times he became Max in America.

And for Gersh/ Hirsch, I've found a few changed to Harris rather than Harry.

These were people >from the area surrounding Brest now in Belarus.

Joy Weaver
East Islip, NY USA






In my family >from Koidanov(23km sw Minsk) 2 unusual to
me names appeared - These were Morduk and Girsh.

The apparently Russian Morduk was associated with
Mordecai which became Morris.

Are these name connections generally correct or just
used in my family?

Les Evenchick
New Orleans,La

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Unusual First Name-Noson #Belarus

Jill Black <jrblack@...>
 

Noson would be the Ashkenazic/Yiddish pronunciation of the Hebrew name
Nathan.

Jill Rovitzky Black
Nyack, NY





What's about the first name NOSON?
Thanks
Christine Usdin
France

Belarus SIG #Belarus unusual names Girm and Girsh #Belarus

Herbert Lazerow
 

If you saw both Girm and Girsh with the same surname, this is the given name Girsh, one of the most common given names. It is very easy to mistake the Russian script m, sh, and t if they are written carelessly.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law, U. of San Diego
5998 Alcala Park, San Diego CA 92110
(619)260-4597, fax 619-260-2230

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Unusual first names #Belarus

Perets Mett <p.mett@...>
 

Annette Stolberg wrote:
My mother's Hebrew name was Brana
When I read my parents' Ketubah, her
name was spelled as Brayna, which would have been her Yiddish
name. The Polish Given Names Database translated the name as "brown"
and appeared as Middle High German for "brown". My mother's name in
English was Bertha, which is the name that appears as the US name
for Brayna.

My mother claimed that her father was in the Prussian Army, but I
have papers that show he was in the Czar's army. Another claim was
made that the family came >from some part of Germany, or Prussia, but
it appears that they lived in the part of Poland that became the
Ukraine?

The name which is spelled Brayna would be pronounced Brana by Jews >from
East Galicia (Ukraine).
So mother was indeed right about her name.

Perets Mett
London

Belarus SIG #Belarus Kolonja Izaaka #Belarus

TzachiK@...
 

Hello Folks --

I've been doing some work looking into the autonomous Jewish farming colony called Kolonja Izaaka (in Russian it's also called Isakova) outside of Odelsk. It was formed in 1849 and existed until WWII. I have no idea if it stands abandoned now, or has become a non-Jewish farmtown. Anyway, if anyone else has any connections there, or expertise in the Jewish colonies of the 19th and early 20th centuries, I'd love to be in touch. It seemed to have been a plucky little place with an interesting story.

Irwin Keller - tzachik@...
Penngrove, California, USA
(Knishevitsky and Lipshitz)

Belarus SIG #Belarus Hebrew translation help needed #Belarus

Isabel Danforth <danforth@...>
 

I have placed a copy of my parents Ketuba on viewmate at the address below.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=10121

I am trying to get the Hebrew spelling of my parents names >from this
document. Their English names were Harry M. Levin and Sophie
Davis. I would also like to get the Hebrew names of their parents if
those are on the Ketuba.

I do have several large sizes of the document if someone believes
that they could provide a better answer with larger image.

Thank you.

Isabel Danforth
Exeter, NH

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: German-sounding names #Belarus

Annette Stolberg <annettes@...>
 

Hello Sally,

Thank you for the information regarding my German sounding Ehrlichman
name. The family originated in Prussia as far as I know. Without
names >from family members, I can't connect the name to any other
Ehrlichmans in the Ukraine and/or Belarus. Your comments about when
Jews moved to these areas in the late middle ages puts my family
information in perspective. So - Prussia it will be as the country of
my family's origins.

Annette Stolberg
Rochester, NY


Yiddish is mostly German written in Hebrew letters, so Jews often took

German sounding surnames even in non-German areas. EHRLICHMAN and
RUSLANDER (one of my names) and lots more are Yiddish in origin.

Belarus SIG #Belarus Next Basic Jewish Genealogy Course beginning July 1, 2007 #Belarus

phylliskramer1 <phylliskramer1@...>
 

New to genealogy? Not sure how to begin? How to organize? What JewishGen has to
offer? Best websites?...well consider JewishGen’s Basic Jewish Genealogy course,
which consists of 8 lessons, delivered online twice weekly. Lessons are PDFs or,
upon request, Word documents, and can be downloaded or read online.

The lessons will cover using genealogy formats, assembling trees, organizing and
tracking information, interviewing, Jewish naming conventions, Internet Genealogy
Resources, U.S. Vital Records, U.S. Census and U.S. passenger manifests (Ellis
Island) and two lessons will be devoted to JewishGen's web site and its many
databases. It will also contain hints and tips on how to best use your computer
and the Internet.

We feature an online Forum where students can post their ancestral information,
documents and photographs, and get answers and suggestions >from the instructor
and fellow students.

The tuition for Basic Genealogy is $36, however, if you qualify for the value
added services by virtue of a $100 annual donation, you are welcome to enroll at
no additional charge (to get the waiver don't enroll just yet, instead send a
note, with your JewishGen ID, to Jewishgen-Education-Support@...).

For more information and to enroll online, go to www.jewishgen.org/education
and read the description. Students should be comfortable browsing the internet
and have 3-5 hours per week available to read the lessons, sample the websites,
and interact with the Forum.

This is our fourth class and has been very well received. Registration is limited
to 60 and once the class is full, registration will be closed.

Hope you can join us
Phyllis Kramer, VicePresident
JewishGen Education

Belarus SIG #Belarus Unusual First Names #Belarus

Lin Mor
 

I have a great uncle - brother of paternal
grandfather, whose name was Schmerko, probably born
around 1890. Never saw another like it except that I
believe the person he was named after is in the
Belarus database as someone who paid a tax in the
1870's.

Linda Morzillo
Present Location: Kaunas, Lithuania
Normal Location: Saratoga Springs, NY






____________________________________________________________________________________

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Unusual First Names #Belarus

Larry Gaum <lgaum@...>
 

I have a great uncle - brother of paternal
grandfather, whose name was Schmerko, probably born
around 1890. Never saw another like it except that I
believe the person he was named after is in the
Belarus database as someone who paid a tax in the
1870's.

Linda Morzillo

The closest I can come to this is a good friend who is SHMEREL (Stephen).
Larry gaum
Toronto, Canada