Date   
JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Archives Research-Outrageous Invoice #general

Claire Petersky <petersky@...>
 

Several people have e-mailed me asking for more information about my
experience. When I told them it was with an archive in the US, not in
Europe, they seemed to think that that piece of information was useful,
and suggested I post that fact.

So, you should know that you can have dubious transactions anywhere, not
just with people in countries with shaky economies or where their language
is different >from yours. Be clear and specific when you write for
information, and then at least you have something to hold them to when the
bill comes.

--
Claire Petersky (petersky@...)

Re: Archives Research-Outrageous Invoice #general

Claire Petersky <petersky@...>
 

Several people have e-mailed me asking for more information about my
experience. When I told them it was with an archive in the US, not in
Europe, they seemed to think that that piece of information was useful,
and suggested I post that fact.

So, you should know that you can have dubious transactions anywhere, not
just with people in countries with shaky economies or where their language
is different >from yours. Be clear and specific when you write for
information, and then at least you have something to hold them to when the
bill comes.

--
Claire Petersky (petersky@...)

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Please cite sources, etc. #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

I teach and speak about Jewish genealogy (physical limitations prevent
my using microfilm machines or travelling to "information lodes" so long
ago I decided to motivate other people to do a little -- or a lot -- of
genealogy and eventually someone would be my cousin!) but I do not
consider myself a "genealogist" or an expert. Because I am not, and
because when I teach I often look things up for my students, I am always
on the look-out for good reference books, sources of expert information,
heuristics for figuring things out, etc. I am still fairly new to the
list so am probably guilty of this myself but would people please try to
remember to cite their sources for information? And if people are
providing answers >from their own base of knowledge, would you please give
some idea about how that base of knowledge was acquired and how extensive
it is? For those of us who are not experts in the subject area but are
well trained in the scientific method thanks to our liberal arts
educations, it would really help to be able not just to check the sources
for that particular question, but also to incorporate that new resource
into our "tool kits". (Especially when someone is trying to be a
conduit of second-hand information it becomes just too difficult to
evaluate that second-hand information before passing it on if one can't
check the sources first.) Thanks in advance, and L'Shalom.

Jonina Duker

Please cite sources, etc. #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

I teach and speak about Jewish genealogy (physical limitations prevent
my using microfilm machines or travelling to "information lodes" so long
ago I decided to motivate other people to do a little -- or a lot -- of
genealogy and eventually someone would be my cousin!) but I do not
consider myself a "genealogist" or an expert. Because I am not, and
because when I teach I often look things up for my students, I am always
on the look-out for good reference books, sources of expert information,
heuristics for figuring things out, etc. I am still fairly new to the
list so am probably guilty of this myself but would people please try to
remember to cite their sources for information? And if people are
providing answers >from their own base of knowledge, would you please give
some idea about how that base of knowledge was acquired and how extensive
it is? For those of us who are not experts in the subject area but are
well trained in the scientific method thanks to our liberal arts
educations, it would really help to be able not just to check the sources
for that particular question, but also to incorporate that new resource
into our "tool kits". (Especially when someone is trying to be a
conduit of second-hand information it becomes just too difficult to
evaluate that second-hand information before passing it on if one can't
check the sources first.) Thanks in advance, and L'Shalom.

Jonina Duker

Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: THE LAST DAYS #hungary

Cheryl Etting <twekkie@...>
 

Dear Nancy (and all)
Please send me a copy of the review. My son was privileged to write the
temporary music for this documentary while employed at the Shoah
foundation. I was able to view segments of the film as my son added
music to the dramatic dialogue. The documentary is a very powerful
representation of the personal experiences of six Holocaust survivors,
out of the 50,000 that were interviewed. The six interviewed survivors
were all >from Hungary, and is a "must see", "must experience" for
anyone researching family >from this area.

Cheryl


There is a movie review in today's New York Times (E16) of a new
documentary
called The Last Days.

Re: THE LAST DAYS #hungary

Cheryl Etting <twekkie@...>
 

Dear Nancy (and all)
Please send me a copy of the review. My son was privileged to write the
temporary music for this documentary while employed at the Shoah
foundation. I was able to view segments of the film as my son added
music to the dramatic dialogue. The documentary is a very powerful
representation of the personal experiences of six Holocaust survivors,
out of the 50,000 that were interviewed. The six interviewed survivors
were all >from Hungary, and is a "must see", "must experience" for
anyone researching family >from this area.

Cheryl


There is a movie review in today's New York Times (E16) of a new
documentary
called The Last Days.

Hungary SIG #Hungary Pernumeranten 1825 #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <lmagyar@...>
 

I tried to think of a way to announce my 50th birthday (today) without being
a boor. The only claim I could proffer that had any merit was that I
volunteer an average of two hours per day moderating the sig. However, that
claim is disingenuous since it is unfair to establish a rule and pretend to
arbitrate it without bias . Therefore, the only justification I could live
with, was to offer the same opportunity to every sig subscriber: pursuant to
your 50th birthday, 50th anniversary, 50th grandchild or winning a 50
million dollar lottery we welcome your announcement of this milestone event
and solicit a gift >from you to the entire sig.

So here's mine-
In order to commemorate my birth, fifty years ago, today, in the
Erlangen/Windsheim DP camp in Germany I would like to present the entire
h-sig with this gift: There are approximately 500 names of pernumeranten
subscribers >from Hungary in the book Sefer Schne Apharim (see Jewishgen info
files to learn more about pernumeranten subscribers). It is a fair
assumption to state that nearly all of these individual donors were alive at
the time of the book's publication in 1825, and living in the respective
towns under which they are listed. In the column titled "Town" you will find
my best effort at transliterating the town name >from the Hebrew into
English. However, many of these town names are not contemporary town names.
Furthermore, some of the town names may have been used exclusively by the
Jewish community there, and are not generally familiar to us. The goal is to
identify each town name shown with its contemporary equivalent. In order to
assist us in the identification process I have included, where noted, the
name of at least one of the town's Rabbis. In some cases only the first name
was given, in other cases no Rabbi's name was listed. Also, despite my best
efforts, the transliterated name of the Rabbi >from the Hebrew into English
may not be entirely accurate. I do have one important clue to share with
you: the order of the towns listed here is identical to the order of the
towns printed in the book. In some of these books the towns are indexed
alphabetically (aleph-bet etc.). In other books the order of the towns
listed are based upon proximity to each other, and perhaps follow the
travelling route of the author who went >from town to town collecting funds
from these patrons in order to pay for the book's publication. This book
lists the towns using the latter method. These are all towns in the area
commonly referred to as the Kingdom of Hungary. Therefore, not included are
towns >from Bohemia, Moravia and Austria. Once we have identified all the
towns (90% of the towns would be sufficient) or by June 8th, 1999 (whichever
comes first)I will start typing in all five hundred names to be posted to
our website. Based upon a cursory review of the pernumeranten pages in the
book, at least 50% of the names include both the first names and the family
names. These names pre-date the 1848 census by 23 years!

Thanks to all you for your kind indulgence. Louis

Sefer Schne Apharim - Cheylek Rishon by Hirsch Brod (Rabbi of Kitzee in
Hungary)Published in Prag 1825

Number Town Rabbi's Name Notes
of names
25 Pressburg Freisich, Wolf
Bettelheim, Moshe
30 Kitzee Vigdor, Isaac
Vigdor, Wolf Rabbi's son
3 Kisdorf (Katan Dorf)
4 Frisze Kirchen
5 Szent Gyogen Nadich, Shmuel
13 Stempan Benet Mordechai
6 Malzka
9 Vacs ?, Anschel
5 Magendorf ?, Gershon
7 Sereda Sopras, Abraham
9 Sededhely Sudetin, Aharon
11 Komren Fisch?, Avrahom
10 Hollicz ?, Avrahom
5 Segalitz Segel, Moshe Ber
5 Gedung ?,Zekel ben Yosef
16 Eisendstadt Perlis, Moshe
6 Mattesdorf ? Bunim
7 Lukenbach Ullman, Avrahom
9 Papa Katz, Wolf
8 Ginz
1 Randik Ullman, Zalman
4 Kestel Lipschitz, Yisroel
4 Weisbrun ?, Arye Leib
13 Leshbrun Hirsch, Shimon
4 Plota Chayes, Wolf
4 Rachendorf
4 Bazeh
4 Charna
3 Rab Cashman, ?
2 Nasmal
21 Ofen Yahson (Obuda)Abeles, Avrahom
23 Pest Konitz, Moshe
2 Aszod Diament, Yisroel
10 Yarmit Sende, Moshe
13 Dindesh
3 Oberham Katz, Yehoshua
11 Miskotz (Miskolcs)Katz, Shmuel
3 Szechin
2 Pestechoy
2 Czeche ? Shmuel Halevi
6 Santif Broida, Shmuel
9 Talla Stern, Leib
10 Mada (Mad) Teitelbaum, Chaim
4 Tokaj Yaffe, Meir
5 Liska (Olazsliska) ?, Shmuel
25 Ujhel (Satoraljaujhely) Teitelbaum, Moshe
15 Ungvar Broida, Shlomo Zalmen
7 Munkacs Weiss, Gedalia
9 Krula (NagyKaroly) Katz, Shlomo
22 Grosswardein(Nagyvar Katz, Meir
19 Arad Steicher, Yakov
14 Temesvar Gerstal, Gavriel
6 Makava (Mako) Friedman. Baruch
11 Segedin
5 Subotca (Subotica)
11 Baiai (Nagybanya)
8 Tolcsva Schonfeld, Moshe Issur
8 Bonyhad
3 Hodyos Herzel, Michel
3 Yanuk Klein, Yom Tov

Pernumeranten 1825 #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <lmagyar@...>
 

I tried to think of a way to announce my 50th birthday (today) without being
a boor. The only claim I could proffer that had any merit was that I
volunteer an average of two hours per day moderating the sig. However, that
claim is disingenuous since it is unfair to establish a rule and pretend to
arbitrate it without bias . Therefore, the only justification I could live
with, was to offer the same opportunity to every sig subscriber: pursuant to
your 50th birthday, 50th anniversary, 50th grandchild or winning a 50
million dollar lottery we welcome your announcement of this milestone event
and solicit a gift >from you to the entire sig.

So here's mine-
In order to commemorate my birth, fifty years ago, today, in the
Erlangen/Windsheim DP camp in Germany I would like to present the entire
h-sig with this gift: There are approximately 500 names of pernumeranten
subscribers >from Hungary in the book Sefer Schne Apharim (see Jewishgen info
files to learn more about pernumeranten subscribers). It is a fair
assumption to state that nearly all of these individual donors were alive at
the time of the book's publication in 1825, and living in the respective
towns under which they are listed. In the column titled "Town" you will find
my best effort at transliterating the town name >from the Hebrew into
English. However, many of these town names are not contemporary town names.
Furthermore, some of the town names may have been used exclusively by the
Jewish community there, and are not generally familiar to us. The goal is to
identify each town name shown with its contemporary equivalent. In order to
assist us in the identification process I have included, where noted, the
name of at least one of the town's Rabbis. In some cases only the first name
was given, in other cases no Rabbi's name was listed. Also, despite my best
efforts, the transliterated name of the Rabbi >from the Hebrew into English
may not be entirely accurate. I do have one important clue to share with
you: the order of the towns listed here is identical to the order of the
towns printed in the book. In some of these books the towns are indexed
alphabetically (aleph-bet etc.). In other books the order of the towns
listed are based upon proximity to each other, and perhaps follow the
travelling route of the author who went >from town to town collecting funds
from these patrons in order to pay for the book's publication. This book
lists the towns using the latter method. These are all towns in the area
commonly referred to as the Kingdom of Hungary. Therefore, not included are
towns >from Bohemia, Moravia and Austria. Once we have identified all the
towns (90% of the towns would be sufficient) or by June 8th, 1999 (whichever
comes first)I will start typing in all five hundred names to be posted to
our website. Based upon a cursory review of the pernumeranten pages in the
book, at least 50% of the names include both the first names and the family
names. These names pre-date the 1848 census by 23 years!

Thanks to all you for your kind indulgence. Louis

Sefer Schne Apharim - Cheylek Rishon by Hirsch Brod (Rabbi of Kitzee in
Hungary)Published in Prag 1825

Number Town Rabbi's Name Notes
of names
25 Pressburg Freisich, Wolf
Bettelheim, Moshe
30 Kitzee Vigdor, Isaac
Vigdor, Wolf Rabbi's son
3 Kisdorf (Katan Dorf)
4 Frisze Kirchen
5 Szent Gyogen Nadich, Shmuel
13 Stempan Benet Mordechai
6 Malzka
9 Vacs ?, Anschel
5 Magendorf ?, Gershon
7 Sereda Sopras, Abraham
9 Sededhely Sudetin, Aharon
11 Komren Fisch?, Avrahom
10 Hollicz ?, Avrahom
5 Segalitz Segel, Moshe Ber
5 Gedung ?,Zekel ben Yosef
16 Eisendstadt Perlis, Moshe
6 Mattesdorf ? Bunim
7 Lukenbach Ullman, Avrahom
9 Papa Katz, Wolf
8 Ginz
1 Randik Ullman, Zalman
4 Kestel Lipschitz, Yisroel
4 Weisbrun ?, Arye Leib
13 Leshbrun Hirsch, Shimon
4 Plota Chayes, Wolf
4 Rachendorf
4 Bazeh
4 Charna
3 Rab Cashman, ?
2 Nasmal
21 Ofen Yahson (Obuda)Abeles, Avrahom
23 Pest Konitz, Moshe
2 Aszod Diament, Yisroel
10 Yarmit Sende, Moshe
13 Dindesh
3 Oberham Katz, Yehoshua
11 Miskotz (Miskolcs)Katz, Shmuel
3 Szechin
2 Pestechoy
2 Czeche ? Shmuel Halevi
6 Santif Broida, Shmuel
9 Talla Stern, Leib
10 Mada (Mad) Teitelbaum, Chaim
4 Tokaj Yaffe, Meir
5 Liska (Olazsliska) ?, Shmuel
25 Ujhel (Satoraljaujhely) Teitelbaum, Moshe
15 Ungvar Broida, Shlomo Zalmen
7 Munkacs Weiss, Gedalia
9 Krula (NagyKaroly) Katz, Shlomo
22 Grosswardein(Nagyvar Katz, Meir
19 Arad Steicher, Yakov
14 Temesvar Gerstal, Gavriel
6 Makava (Mako) Friedman. Baruch
11 Segedin
5 Subotca (Subotica)
11 Baiai (Nagybanya)
8 Tolcsva Schonfeld, Moshe Issur
8 Bonyhad
3 Hodyos Herzel, Michel
3 Yanuk Klein, Yom Tov

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rev. Boyle marrying Orthodox Jews #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

Here are speculations to try to account for the mystery or to
track it down
- even though one would expect the officiant to fill out the paperwork
and know his (in this time period safe to assume) own name, this
officiant was the Cantor and someone else filled out the paperwork
(having an injured dominant hand I always try to find someone else to
fill out my paperwork by hand) so Boyle is a mis-spelling ... one could
do a "reverse" Daitch-Mokotoff to find more ethnically Jewish names that
sound like Boyle and then check city directories
- maybe Cantor Boyle's handwriting or English was so bad that he needed
help with the paperwork and the helper made a mistake
- this was a Cantor Boyle whose name used to be something else (least
likely because as a cantor one would probably not want a name that didn't
sound Jewish, or maybe one would depending on the social attitudes of the
time and the place ???)
- Rabbi Black /Block was new to the States or to PA and was not yet
allowed to officiate per the civil authorities, the family wanted the
rabbi to be meseder kiddushin so the rabbi found a buddy, Rev. Boyle, to
handle the civil effectuation of the marriage while the rabbi did the
religious ... could check into city, county, or state archives for both
lists of authorized officiants and the rules about who could become an
authorized officiant of the time (in my state now this is county
business, one has to fill out paperwork at the county courthouse to
officiate in this county legally)
- maybe Rabbi Black/Block couldn't legally officiate and Rev. Boyle was
someone who had helped the family or was friendly so again the rabbi did
the religious ceremony and the reverend took care of the civil
necessities
- one could somehow (know already this won't help Ricki Zunz) in this
situation look for other family or neighborhood weddings to see if the
same "team" officiated
- probably for any scenario, the city directory is the way to go for
various versions of the two names

Jonina Duker

Re: Rev. Boyle marrying Orthodox Jews #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

Here are speculations to try to account for the mystery or to
track it down
- even though one would expect the officiant to fill out the paperwork
and know his (in this time period safe to assume) own name, this
officiant was the Cantor and someone else filled out the paperwork
(having an injured dominant hand I always try to find someone else to
fill out my paperwork by hand) so Boyle is a mis-spelling ... one could
do a "reverse" Daitch-Mokotoff to find more ethnically Jewish names that
sound like Boyle and then check city directories
- maybe Cantor Boyle's handwriting or English was so bad that he needed
help with the paperwork and the helper made a mistake
- this was a Cantor Boyle whose name used to be something else (least
likely because as a cantor one would probably not want a name that didn't
sound Jewish, or maybe one would depending on the social attitudes of the
time and the place ???)
- Rabbi Black /Block was new to the States or to PA and was not yet
allowed to officiate per the civil authorities, the family wanted the
rabbi to be meseder kiddushin so the rabbi found a buddy, Rev. Boyle, to
handle the civil effectuation of the marriage while the rabbi did the
religious ... could check into city, county, or state archives for both
lists of authorized officiants and the rules about who could become an
authorized officiant of the time (in my state now this is county
business, one has to fill out paperwork at the county courthouse to
officiate in this county legally)
- maybe Rabbi Black/Block couldn't legally officiate and Rev. Boyle was
someone who had helped the family or was friendly so again the rabbi did
the religious ceremony and the reverend took care of the civil
necessities
- one could somehow (know already this won't help Ricki Zunz) in this
situation look for other family or neighborhood weddings to see if the
same "team" officiated
- probably for any scenario, the city directory is the way to go for
various versions of the two names

Jonina Duker

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family Tree of the Jewish People-Format of GEDCOM? #general

cat2steve@...
 

Now that the FTJP is online, I've done a search on some of
my own ancestors, which leads me to ask how other people
have listed their families in their genealogy programs
when names are changed.

As an example, my Great great grandfather was
Jehudah Leib TEVYANSKI, who changed his name to Louis TAVAN
when he was naturalized.

In my genealogy program (Reunion) I listed him like this:
Jehudah Leib (Louis) TEVYANSKI (TAVAN). Needless to say,
this is somewhat hard to read. I was trying to show the
name changes. After submitting my GEDCOM file to the FTJP,
it appears like this:
"Jehudah Leib (Louis) TEVYANSKI_(TAVAN". And his children
are listed with the same bizarre looking surname. Note the
underscore and missing right parenthesis.

So, how do others indicate the surname change? And for
those siblings who changed their surnames to a different
spelling? Obviously, I have some editting to do to my
database, but how do you show the name changes?

Thanks,

Steve Snyder
Reston, Virginia
JGSGW member

Family Tree of the Jewish People-Format of GEDCOM? #general

cat2steve@...
 

Now that the FTJP is online, I've done a search on some of
my own ancestors, which leads me to ask how other people
have listed their families in their genealogy programs
when names are changed.

As an example, my Great great grandfather was
Jehudah Leib TEVYANSKI, who changed his name to Louis TAVAN
when he was naturalized.

In my genealogy program (Reunion) I listed him like this:
Jehudah Leib (Louis) TEVYANSKI (TAVAN). Needless to say,
this is somewhat hard to read. I was trying to show the
name changes. After submitting my GEDCOM file to the FTJP,
it appears like this:
"Jehudah Leib (Louis) TEVYANSKI_(TAVAN". And his children
are listed with the same bizarre looking surname. Note the
underscore and missing right parenthesis.

So, how do others indicate the surname change? And for
those siblings who changed their surnames to a different
spelling? Obviously, I have some editting to do to my
database, but how do you show the name changes?

Thanks,

Steve Snyder
Reston, Virginia
JGSGW member

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: Louis WEISS, b. Slovakia, 1865 #general

Judy Petersen
 

My ggf, Louis WEISS (B: Slovakia 1865, parents Moshe Ya'acov and Betty
Ungerleider WEISS, immigrated to US 1879, married Anna WEISBERG, 5 children
Minnie, David, Morton, Lillian and Beatrice) had 4 sisters, first names
unknown; 3 married men named William GREENWALD, A. JACOBSEN and PERLSTEIN.
Louis moved with his family >from NYC to Cleveland about 1905, the rest of his
family stayed in NYC. I am seeking descendants of his sisters. Anyone with
information regarding this family please e-mail me directly.
Thank you!!

Judy Petersen

Searching: Louis WEISS, b. Slovakia, 1865 #general

Judy Petersen
 

My ggf, Louis WEISS (B: Slovakia 1865, parents Moshe Ya'acov and Betty
Ungerleider WEISS, immigrated to US 1879, married Anna WEISBERG, 5 children
Minnie, David, Morton, Lillian and Beatrice) had 4 sisters, first names
unknown; 3 married men named William GREENWALD, A. JACOBSEN and PERLSTEIN.
Louis moved with his family >from NYC to Cleveland about 1905, the rest of his
family stayed in NYC. I am seeking descendants of his sisters. Anyone with
information regarding this family please e-mail me directly.
Thank you!!

Judy Petersen

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Croatia #general

Carl Alpert <alpert@...>
 

Those interested in Croatian ties may be interested in learning that the
Jewish communities in Croatia have just issued a 78 page publication, in
English, entitled VOICE - Vol II. It contains articles on the Jewish
community of Zagreb and Vukovar, among others, listing many scores of
family names >from the past. Volume I was published in 1996 and contains
similar material. Vol I also announced impending publication of a Jewish
Biographical lexicon listing some 5,000 names of Jews who were prominent
in Croatia >from Roman times to the present.
Contact is the editor, Vlasta Kovac, whom I had the pleasure of meeting
last year when she attended the Jewish journalists' conference in
Jerusalem. Her e-mail address: jcz@...
Carl Alpert

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Name discrepancies #general

wyzanskyh@...
 

With all the recent mentions of name discrepancies in records, I would
like to mention one that has had me tearing my hair a bit. My grandfather
was Nathan MINTZ. His Hebrew name, as recorded on his tombstone, was
Noach ben Chaim Yitzchak. His sister's tombstone also gives the father's
name as Chaim Yitzchak. Yet his marriage record which I found in the
Vital Statistics in Massachusetts, when he married my grandmother Sarah
Ferrar in 1910 in Malden, says that his father's name was Morris Mintz.
Considering that his father never made it to America >from Lithuania, does
anybody have an idea how he could have come up with "Morris" as an
English name for Chaim Yitzchak?

Harold Wyzansky
Cherry Hill, NJ

WYZANSKY: Suwalki -> Boston
FERRAR: Sheveneshik, Lith -> Boston
MINTZ, STEINBERG: Kedainai, Lith -> Boston
PARNES: Dukla, Galicia -> NY
HOROWITZ: Manow, Galicia
NEIMAN, FEUERWWERGER: Vishivu, Romania -> NY

Croatia #general

Carl Alpert <alpert@...>
 

Those interested in Croatian ties may be interested in learning that the
Jewish communities in Croatia have just issued a 78 page publication, in
English, entitled VOICE - Vol II. It contains articles on the Jewish
community of Zagreb and Vukovar, among others, listing many scores of
family names >from the past. Volume I was published in 1996 and contains
similar material. Vol I also announced impending publication of a Jewish
Biographical lexicon listing some 5,000 names of Jews who were prominent
in Croatia >from Roman times to the present.
Contact is the editor, Vlasta Kovac, whom I had the pleasure of meeting
last year when she attended the Jewish journalists' conference in
Jerusalem. Her e-mail address: jcz@...
Carl Alpert

Name discrepancies #general

wyzanskyh@...
 

With all the recent mentions of name discrepancies in records, I would
like to mention one that has had me tearing my hair a bit. My grandfather
was Nathan MINTZ. His Hebrew name, as recorded on his tombstone, was
Noach ben Chaim Yitzchak. His sister's tombstone also gives the father's
name as Chaim Yitzchak. Yet his marriage record which I found in the
Vital Statistics in Massachusetts, when he married my grandmother Sarah
Ferrar in 1910 in Malden, says that his father's name was Morris Mintz.
Considering that his father never made it to America >from Lithuania, does
anybody have an idea how he could have come up with "Morris" as an
English name for Chaim Yitzchak?

Harold Wyzansky
Cherry Hill, NJ

WYZANSKY: Suwalki -> Boston
FERRAR: Sheveneshik, Lith -> Boston
MINTZ, STEINBERG: Kedainai, Lith -> Boston
PARNES: Dukla, Galicia -> NY
HOROWITZ: Manow, Galicia
NEIMAN, FEUERWWERGER: Vishivu, Romania -> NY

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NYC repositories open Sun? #general

D. Abrams <dabrams1@...>
 

Hi-

Does anyone know of any libraries or other repositories in Manhattan with
holdings useful for genealogical research that are open on Sundays? I'm
interested in passenger manifests, census records, city directories and
other standard sources.
Thanks,
Dena Abrams
Merrick, NY

NYC repositories open Sun? #general

D. Abrams <dabrams1@...>
 

Hi-

Does anyone know of any libraries or other repositories in Manhattan with
holdings useful for genealogical research that are open on Sundays? I'm
interested in passenger manifests, census records, city directories and
other standard sources.
Thanks,
Dena Abrams
Merrick, NY