Date   
Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech POLAK, POLLAK, FISCHER, Prostejov, etc. #Austria-Czech

Raymond Minkus <RDM@...>
 

Celia, Judith and Randy:

In regards to Pollak, Polak, Fischer, Prostejov, I am including some
very cursory, highly abridged information that may or may not be of
value. However, it is what I can send until I get home this evening and
am able to get into other records with information about the various
topics. I have more about the aforementioned surnames and Prostejov,
but they are in other files. Let me know if this helps.

Ray


These are >from part of my family tree. The first is for a marriage to a
Pollak and the family lived at one time in Prostejov. The other is for
a Fischer,

A) Salomon KNOPFELMACHER was born September 08, 1810 in Holesov,
Moravia, and died in Prossnitz (Prostejov), Moravia. He married Juli
POLLAK.

Salomon KNOPFELMACHER lived in Krasna, then subsequently went to
Prossnitz. According to the history of Valasske Mezirici, in 1857,
Salomon Knopfelmacher [son of Emanuel] and his family resided in the
building where Krasna's city hall is located (cp. 90). The Knopflmacher
Stammbaum indicates that Salomon later moved to Prossnitz (Prostejov),
where he died. He and his wife, Juli (Pollak), had seven children, of
whom four have been identified.

Children of Salomon KNOPFELMACHER and Juli POLLAK are:
i. (child)16 KNOPFELMACHER, born Abt. 1847.
ii. (child) KNOPFELMACHER, born Abt. 1849.
iii. (child) KNOPFELMACHER, born Abt. 1852.
iv. Zilli KNOPFELMACHER, born Abt. 1854 in Krasna
(Krasne nad Becvou), Moravia.
v. Augusta KNOPFELMACHER, born Abt. 1857 in Krasna
(Krasne nad Becvou), Moravia.
She married Heinrich FRIESS December
25, 1887 in Prossnitz (Prostejov), Moravia.
vi. Paula KNOPFELMACHER, born Abt. 1859 in Krasna
(Krasne nad Becvou), Moravia.
She married Ignatz RUMPLER March 03,
1886 in Prossnitz (Prostejov), Moravia.
vii. Bertha KNOPFELMACHER, born Abt. 1862 in Krasna
(Krasne nad Becvou), Moravia.
She married Ignatz HUSSERL December
11, 1888 in Prossnitz (Prostejov), Moravia.


B) Nissel14 ADLER was born Abt. 1796 in Holesov, Moravia. She married
Moses Joachim FISCHER.

Children of Nissel ADLER and Moses FISCHER are:
i. Samuel1 FISCHER.
ii. Gerson FISCHER, died in Brno, Moravia.
iii. Salomon FISCHER, died in Valasske
Mezirici, Moravia.
iv. Zulke FISCHER. She married WINKLER of
Prossnitz.
v. Itzig FISCHER, died in Szeged, Csongrad Co.,
Hungary.
vi. Mordechai (Mordche) FISCHER.


searching for family of Dr. Jacob Eduard POLAK (POLLAK)
snip>>>>>>>>>>

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech BONDY - WIENER wedding banns - Prague 1857 #Austria-Czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Another item of possible interest to some our siggers has appeared on the best-
known internet auction site.

It is a document headed "K und K Werbbezirks Konskriptionsamte der Kongl.
Hauptstadt Prag" with the seal of the City of Prague dated 8 April 1857,
relating to the marriage permission between Gottlieb Lazar BONDY aged 25
[Mosaich and single] with Simonetta WIENER aged 22 [Mosaich].

I believe it says something about Gottlieb's occupation Fabriks ??? but I
cannot read it.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Directory of bamboo cane traders in 1790s Prague #Austria-Czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

The Prague census of 1792 - 1794 Vol VI/I brings up some very interesting
professions including "Spanisches Rohrhandler" [umlaut *a* in handler]. I
looked this up [assuming it was sugar cane] on the internet and got a "google
whack": http://www.toninorubattu.it/ita/C1.htm

but to my surprise here it states it is *bamboo* or cane:
fauteuil rotin, French = Spanischesrohr Sessel, Ger = cane armchair

http://giteairmarin.chez-alice.fr/Inventaire.html

The word could also encompass "rattan".

So here is another surprising finding resulting >from my research into the
eighteenth century "cane" traders of Prague, namely that four out of the ten
traders were called JEITELES/JAITELES. I suspect they may have been related.
Here are all of the Jewish "cane" traders of Prague in 1792-94 that I could
identify:

1. Veit JEITELES [121]* widower with 5 sons. Only one [Abraham No 4] married in
1791 in Kronich, Germany, so we must assume that the others are all adult and
Veit is probably 55 or over.
2. Michael JAITELES [44]
3. Low JAITELES aka Lewi JAITELES - one son [300]
4. Herschmann Michl JEITELES/JAIELES [129]
5. Abraham LEIPPEN [145]
6. Absalom KISCH probably identical to Abraham Hersch KISCH [281]
7. Jakob Abraham RADISCH [118]
8. Naphtale HOCK [210]
9. Moses THORSCH {son of Isak Moises THORSCH} [281]
10. Elias WEDELES [widower] one son Salomon, absent in Peteine? [258]

Cane was used for for furniture, flutes [would not use much!], walking sticks,
summer-house decoration for the wealthy. Did bamboo/cane perhaps have other
large-scale uses in Bohemia - ie lath-and-plaster ceiling work in building?

see also: http://tinyurl.com/y325fq

I find it rather astounding that 10 families were living off the bamboo/cane
trade in Prague in the late 1700s. I wish we could do a similar study in
Moravia and Vienna.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Footnotes: * These numbers refer to the pages in Vol VI/1 - Prague Jewish
census of 1792 and 1794 ISBN 80-86712-34-6, where the families appear in full.

Acknowledgment: Thanks as always to Jan Hellmann and Hanus Grab who translated
a Czech sentence for me indicating that the profession, in the case of Low
JAITELES, was added to the census later in another hand.

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech "Pinkel Jud" #Austria-Czech

MBernet@...
 

In a 1768 Census of Jewish Taxpayers of Deutschkreutz, Sopron county,
Habsburg Hungary, a number of taxpayers are listed as "Pinkel Jud" or "Pinkel
Juden".

Someone >from another list asked me for the meaning of the expression. It
appears to be related to the Yiddish expression "Pintele Yid" or "Pintele Yud"
which is something of a triple pun and can be equivalent to "the dot over the
i," the essence of being Jewish" and "even the least significant Jew." Pintel
is derived >from the German Punkt of which Puenkel is a diminutive.

Can anyone here elaborate on this? Any connection with an itinerant salesman?

Michael Bernet, New York

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Directory of bamboo cane traders in 1790s Prague #Austria-Czech

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/10/2007 6:36:26 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
celiamale@... writes:

<< The Prague census of 1792 - 1794 Vol VI/I brings up some very
interesting professions including "Spanisches Rohrhandler" [umlaut *a*
in handler]. I looked this up [assuming it was sugar cane] on the internet
and got a "google
whack": _http://www.toninorubattu.it/ita/C1.htm_
(http://www.toninorubattu.it/ita/C1.htm)

<< but to my surprise here it states it is *bamboo* or cane: >>

==It makes sense. The "cane" in sugar stayed behind in the Americas.
All that arrived in Europe was paper-wrapped cones.

==We refer to an object's specific nature, style and origin. Nobody referred
to a stemwinder as an analog watch until digital watches appeared. When did
you last see a bag of sugar marked "cane" -- or "beet" for that matter. What
perhaps mattered more when the product arrived in Europe was its geographic
origin, thus we would have Demerara sugar >from Guyana, Emmenthaler cheese,

==sugar traders traded in sugar and the census takers had no interest in how
their sugar was created. These tradesmen dealt in cane. Perhaps bamboo --
perhaps even some generic non-bamboo cane -- bamboo may have been the
convenient term for the censuses taker to use, whatever the origin.

==How does that apply to genealogy: when trying to understand a word, a
sense, a circumstance, look at it >from all directions -- use, appearance,
history, size, destination -- and all possible variations.

Michael Bernet, New York

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: "Pinkel Jud" #Austria-Czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Michael Bernet wrote: "In a 1768 Census of Jewish Taxpayers of Deutschkreutz,
Sopron county, Habsburg Hungary, a number of taxpayers are listed as "Pinkel
Jud" or "Pinkel Juden".

Someone >from another list asked me for the meaning of the expression. It
appears to be related to the Yiddish expression "Pintele Yid" or "Pintele
Yud" > which is something of a triple pun and can be equivalent to "the dot
over the "i," the essence of being Jewish" and "even the least significant
Jew." Pintel is derived >from the German Punkt of which Puenkel is a
diminutive.
Can anyone here elaborate on this? Any connection with an itinerant
salesman?"

I would like to refer you to the SIG message archives when I used the term for
a peddler/pedlar as it appears in the 1793 census of Bohemia - either
Pinkeltrager or Pinkel Jude. Alternatively the word may appear as
Binkel/Binkl/Pinkl.

There are numerous citations on the internet for *Binkel* which is a bundle, a
sack or small bag, ie a peddler with a sack on his back. It may be Austrian
dialect, if it does not appear in Hoch-Deutsch.

In my family, the word was commonly used in the form of *Fetzenpinkel* ie a
ragbag and this was a useful source of small pieces of fabric for embroidery,
craftwork etc. My Viennese grandmother, Ida {nee WOTTITZ} KERNER even wrote a
poem dedicated to her Fetzenpinkel, which I should publish one day. Here the
Fetzenpinkel [bundle of rags] is synonymous with a bundle of memories conjured
up by the fabric snippets.

The term is used metaphorically by Hermann Broch relating to the rag bag of
thoughts and facts in his mind:

http://www.literaturhaus.at/veranstaltungen/broch/

There is no doubt that the term Pinkel Jude was rather derogatory, indicating
the lowest of the low. As for the Yiddish connection, I leave that to my
friendly experts, I have consulted.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Katscher = Kietrz, Silesia, Poland #Austria-Czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

My KATSCHER ancestors came >from Branky, Moravia and before 1800 from
Lostice, Moravia. But Jan Hellman sent me a copy of an article in Judaica
Bohemiae XL (2005) on tax records concerning Jewish settlements in Moravia
in 1667, and there I read a report of the administrator of Hotzenplotz
(Osoblaha) who also was the administrator of the town of Katscher, Silesia
(Ketr in Czech, Kietrz in Polish). The town is just 10 miles north of Opava
(Troppau), Moravia, now just on the other side of the Polish border.

This leads me to suspect that my KATSCHER ancestors must have come >from what
is now Kietrz, Poland (my first Polish connection, if it is true). Can
anyone suggest how I might find out more about the history of this town? I
searched JGFF and came up with only one old record (posted in 1998). I am
not even sure which SIG would cover it (if not ours).

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech finding a tombstone in Vienna #Austria-Czech

milton koch <miltonkoch@...>
 

I believe that I may have located the grave of a great-grandmother.
Her name was Hince BARBASCH. She was buried in Zentralfriedhof IV Tor,
group 21, row 16, grave 47.
How do I find out if she has a tombstone, and if so, how do I get either
a picture of it or a rubbing.
Thanks.
Please answer privately

Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD USA
BARBASCH/KOCH/GINSBERG

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Pinkel Juden #Austria-Czech

Jan O. hellmann <jan@...>
 

There has arisen question concerning the above designation. It has also
occurred in connection with my family and the result of investigation
showed that it designates a Jew wandering >from village to village with his
shop in a grip sack on his back (Buendel)

Jan O. Hellmann/DK
Researching HELLMANN,EHRMANN,HELLER,GUTH,SCHULHOF

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Prague cane merchants #Austria-Czech

Julia Clarke <juliaclarke@...>
 

Celia Male is puzzled that there should be so many (10) cane merchants
recorded in Prague in the 1790s but without comparable figures for other
trades it is hard to know how disproportionate that is. Was it an
exclusively Jewish business in Prague?

I did a quick search in a general London trade directory for 1808 (the
earliest I could find online) expecting to find many more given the size
of London but came up with two "whalebone & cane merchants" and five
"whip, stick & cane shops/manufacturers". Of course each of these
businesses would have employed several people. One must also add to that
the many who were not affluent enough to get into a trade directory,
those whose business was importing bamboo, malacca and rattan and also
the very poor like chairmenders who would go round the streets offering
to recane chair seats and backs. I wonder how accurate people had to be
for the Prague census - could a "Rohrhandler" also really be a
chairmender on the principle that rubbish collectors prefer to call
themselves sanitary operatives?

With best wishes
Julia Clarke, London

Julia Clarke
juliaclarke@...

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Pinkeljude #Austria-Czech

Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@...>
 

Having been born in Vienna and since my mother tongue is German I can
certainly confirm that in the German language used in Austria the word
PINKEL or BINKEL simply means bag. I also have gone through dozens of
censuses >from the late 18th and early 19th century of the Jewish
population of western Hungary, western Slovakia and the Burgenland.
The word Pinkeljude refers unquestionably to those Jewish traders,
who went >from village to village during the week, with a bag of
merchandise on their back to sell their wares. In fact I have a copy
of one of my distant relatives Max Kestlers (1812-1889) who started
out as a "Pinkeljude" and whose diary was published in the periodical
Judaica in 1937. He describes in great detail how on Sunday he used to
pick up merchandise >from the Jewish wholesalers in Pressburg, and then
continued on foot for the rest of the week selling his wares in nearby
small towns and villages. On Friday afternoon he used to return to
Ragendorf (now Rajka) so that by evening would be home.

Henry Wellisch
Toronto

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Google Books #Austria-Czech

meretz
 

GERSIG member Roger Lustig informs us that although it's been mentioned before,
http://books.google.com deserves to be checked frequently. Older books
are often downloadable as PDFs.

These examples are likely to be of interest to several of our SIG members:

Bondy & Dworsky, _Geschichte der Juden in Boehmen, Maehren und Schlesien
von 906 bis 1620_. 2vv. Prag, 1906.

Kaufmann, _Die letzte Vertreibung der Juden aus Wien und
Niederoesterreich_. Budapest, 1889.

Bureau fuer Statistik der Juden, _Die Juden in Oesterreich_.
Berlin-Halensee, 1908.

Stein, _Die Geschichte der Juden in Boehmen_. Bruenn, 1904.

Rabbi A. Frankl-Gruen, _Geschichte der Juden in Kremsier_. Frankfurt
am Main, 1898.

Thank you, Roger, for this important information.

Uri Meretz, Israel

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Jewellers 1922-1939 #Austria-Czech

Micheline GUTMANN
 

A former member of our board who is dead now (we regret him very much)
had a list of addresses of Jewellers in Europe and he let me names copied
from it. As the original was hand written by his father Anton HERZL who was
himself a jeweller, he perhaps did a few errors when he wrote.
This list could perhaps be useful for some members.
Dates : 1922-1939
Don't ask me explanations, I don't understand everything myself.

Germany

- Landheimer - Francfort s/m zuil 123
- Benno Haas - WolfsgangstraBe 89 - Frankfurt /a/m
- Robert Koch - KaiserstraBe 26 - Frankfurt
- Otto Hintze-Jungfirnstieg 32 - Hamburg
- E. Oltmann - Hansahaus - Aegidientorpl.4 Hanover

Tchecoslovaquie

- E. Jaeger - Praha. Prikopy 26 (Br-F)
- Oskar Jaeger - Praha - II Vaclavske nam 35/IVe
- Hugo Freund and Co - A, G, Prasne brany I - Praha
- Langer - Praha
- Bruder Falkenau, Praha - Hybernerg 32 (Hybernska)
Revolucni 17 (Br H)
- Sigmund Fuschak (Oscar) Praha - Ruzova ul 5 (ann=E9e 1939)

Hongrie

- Zipper, a Bachruchs Vachfolger A.G. Budapest -Varzi utea2
- Oberregierungsrat Fhieberger _Budapest
- Alexander S.Littmann - Budapest - 5 Erzebet ute
- Littmann S. Sandor, Budapest VII Wesselenyi - utes 4

Austria

-Jul Hugler(Inhaber Heing Hugbs) Kommerzialrat
I Freisinger 4 Badgastein - Salzburg

VII Neubourg 81 - Gischaeftofuhrer Car (Prem - Zeichnerim frau
Hesla Due (ou Sue) Private : Mme Barbara. H. XIII - Schweizertalstrasse 40

-Oesteneicher (father Morig, son Otto) I graben 7 (mother Hermine XVIII)

- (1st letter difficult l? p? t?) -Pozleinsdorfer strasse 59 -
- A.E. Koechest - boutique - I Neuer Markt 15
- Siegfried Herzl - boutique - Spiegelg 23
- E. Lukacs - boutique - neuer Markt 82
- Kurt Steinitz - boutique - Kaerntuerstrasse 29 (Buckhalter Simesl)
- Sigmund Fuschak, fabrique, VI Hirscheng 2
- Arthur Fuxhak, fabrique, Wipplinger strasse 3 (his brother)
- Fuerst, fabrique, VI Landwirthg 14
- Joseph Siess Soehne fabrique, VI Luftbadg 7
- Brueder Frank fabrique, VI Hirscheng 7
- Michael Lukacs - boutique - Karntuerstrasse 28
- Siegfried Mauthuer - boutique - (fa Michael Goldschmidt Soehne)
Karntuerstrasse 2 (in Paris mai 1934)
- Commerzialrat Karl Brunner(ehemals Huebner)Kohlmarkt 16 (his daughter
Herta)
- Ernst Paltsho Graben 14
- Julius Figdor et Soehni Graben 15
- H. Wand - Haendler I Ganzagag 12 (his son in Paris)
- Alexander Pisk - Haendler IV Gusshaus strasse 17 (formely I
Jasomirgattstrasse 2)
- Sigm. Lukacs - Haendler Rudolfplatz 5
- Emanuel Fraudinberg VI Linke Wienzeili 4
- Rudolf Viklasch I Habsburgerg 10
- Isidor Faeber II (J ou j )- aborstrasse 59
- Moses Singer II Gredlerg 2 (went to Palestine)
- Joseph Klein II Kleine Sperlg 1
- Wichelin Kurth jr I Plantleng 6
- Kraft and Drassky (Drassky Jibor Varodny)
- Stern Lapidaire II Hollandstrasse 2 (fasser)
- S. Finkles Haendler IX Mellnerg 26 (no comment)
- D. Lemberger Haendler III Kollerg 20 (to Palestine)
- Leop. Kalberstadt Haendler VIII Lescheng 26
- Paul Hirsch IX LiechtensteinstraBe 3
- Leoopold Weiss V Castillig 21
- Brueder Herzl I Spiegelg 13 (private Arthur VI Theobalg 15)
- Brueder Fischer I Spiegelg 3
private Robert, Madame Dina
Ferdinand IX Porzellang 52
his wife Elsa

his son Erich

- Max Gluckselig antiquitatur I Stattburg 2
- Aut Weikhard Sohne - Graz 1 Hauptplatz 13
- Richard RotenturmstraBe 31
- Norbert Spitzer I Spiegelg 21 (privat I Gonzollweiherg 1)
- Isidor Horowitz I Plankeug 2 Juwelengeschaeft
(private Rudolfplatz 4 Steig 4th - door17)
- Leop. Wessely II Castillizg 33
- Anten Herzel III Gerlg 18 (was associate Br H)
- Lizi Barda IX Bergy 22 (daughter of Therese)
- Julie Hauser II Glockeng 8 (Rothensterng 7)
- Arthur Kantor I Postg 6 (avocat)
- Gustav Veugroeschl II Lilienbrunng 12 (restaurant)

Micheline GUTMANN, Paris, France
site GenAmi www.genami.org

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Mattersburg_Mattersdorf #Austria-Czech

Traude Triebel
 

http://school4you.schulweb.at/real/1/doku/juden_im_raum_mattersburg.doc

on this site you will find: Jewish in and surrounding
Mattersdorf;Mattersburg

for example:

Alconiere Herman Theodor (geb. Kohn)
Peter Beer (Perez ben Issak
Adolf Berczeller
Dr. Richard Berczeller
Dr. Endre Csatkai
Oskar Klein
Der "Koppel-Jud" aus Wiesen
Die Familie Leitner
Jakob und David Zwi Pinkas
Albert Pollak
Alfred Weis (Alfred v.d. Vulka

Friendly regards
Traude Triebel
A 2700 Wr.Neustadt
Austria

MODERATOR NOTE: The document opened by the above url is quite large and may
take a few minutes to load.

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: "Pinkel Jud" #Austria-Czech

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/11/2007 8:13:01 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
celiamale@... writes:

<< There are numerous citations on the internet for *Binkel* which is a
bundle, a sack or small bag, ie a peddler with a sack on his back.
It may be Austrian dialect, if it does not appear in Hoch-Deutsch. >>

==Thank you, Celia, and everyone.

==I have been overwhelmed by the responses >from this List, most of them
erudite and excellently supported. All agree on Pinkel as "bag" or "pack" and
Pinkeljud as the poorest of peddlers. I passed on the meaning to the person who
first inquired. Apparently its usage is restricted to Austria and its
colonies and is unknown in Germany.

=I assume the combination of Pinkeljud was related to the expression "a
Pintele Yid" with humor and affection. Though he was indeed poor, he was at the
same time the basic, essential Jew of those impoverished times.

Michael Bernet, New York
_www.mem-Ber.net_ (http://www.mem-Ber.net)

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Seeking: Charles BERNARD #Austria-Czech

Adam Bernard <adam@...>
 

Can anyone help?

I'm trying to locate any Austrian relatives. My GG Grandad who came over to
England >from Austria between 1841-1881. His name was Charles Bernard and his
father's name was Oscar. They were both silk merchants but I don't know
where abouts in Austria they were from. I think they may have been Jewish. I
don't know whether Bernard was shortened >from a longer or different name,
but the name Kafebaum has also been rumoured.

Any help at all would be greatfully received.

Best wishes, Adam Bernard

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Fw: "Pinkel Jud" #Austria-Czech

Hans Peter Grab <hpgrab@...>
 

Pinkeljude was a poorest hawker (dealer with cheapest goods and scrap).

Search in (Ignaz Briess - Ghettoleben - unfortunately only in German)
http://www.schroefl.com/en/biographien/ignaz_briess/index.php?
/en/biographien/ignaz_briess/briess_01_05.php
the word "Pinkeljud".

Hanus Grab

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Pinkel/Binkel/ Pintele - Yiddish consonant shifts #Austria-Czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Yiddish is not usually discussed on our SIG, but if linguistics can help us
understand a census entry and subtleties in texts, then we should make full use
of expert knowledge. I consulted a very knowledgeable Yiddish linguistics
expert, as promised in my last posting, and this is what the answer was:

"p and b alternate regularly in some German dialects as in Pinkel/Binkel.
Yiddish generally had b where standard German does but it occasionally has p as
in poyer for Bauer, puter for Butter, peymen for Boehmen [now that is important
for us!] Interestingly, where Yiddish was spoken in the same territory as a
German dialect that had Pauer, Yiddish used a b in the word.

In a borrowing >from Slavic, Peitsche, Yiddish has baytsh.

t and k alternate occasionally in Germanic dialects/languages as in Austrian
German Binkel, Yiddish bintl. [nb this may be significant in our current
discussion, CM].

Another sporadic alternation is p and t in certain positions: for example
Eastern Yiddish has tfiln, some Western Yiddish pfiln. This is related tf for
pf in some Western Yiddish as in tferd for German Pferd (but East Yiddish
ferd!)
The opportunities for puns and word play are there and certainly exploited."


So this is where we came in with the Pintele Yid/Yud [Michael Bernet's
question*] vs the Pinkel/Binkl Jude - the pedlar/peddler we are all so familiar
with. In those far off days, everyone would have understood the joke and the
puns, but today we are at sea.

However help may be at hand re Yiddish regional dialects. I heard last week
that there is a large, as yet untapped, archive of spoken yiddish in Berlin!
This was collected by the amazing Austrian linguist Alois BRANDL {born
Innsbruck 21 June 1855-1940 Berlin - I very much doubt he was Jewish}. He was
professor in Prague, Gottingen and Strasburg as well as Berlin:

http://www.hu-berlin.de/presse/zeitung/archiv/04_05/num_9/seite11.pdf.

Brandl also collected 1000s of British and French dialects >from prisoners of
war [WW1] which are only now being transcribed. If you can read German, or
rudimentary German, you will see the rationale behind this project on p 3.].

http://www.iasa-online.de/Lautarchiv-deutsch.pdf [in German]

We may have exciting finds ahead. I hope some one will investigate this yiddish
archive soon.

Celia Male [U.K.]

* Michael wrote: "Pintele Yid" or "Pintele Yud" which is something of a triple
pun and can be equivalent to "the dot over the i," the essence of being Jewish"
and "even the least significant Jew." Pintel is derived >from the German Punkt
of which Puenkel is a diminutive.

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Site cite: Annual reports about a secondary school in Vienna 1883/84 #Austria-Czech

Oliver Bryk <oliverbryk@...>
 

Thanks to www.books.google.com one can search a treasure trove of
information about our ancestors' environment. As an example, I found that my
gf Siegfried BRYK was a student in the 5th grade at the "k.k.
Staatsgymnasium im II. Bezirke von Wien, Taborstrasse 24" in 1883/84; his
brother Ernst BRYK was in the 3rd grade (as was Karl POPPER). The report
("Jahresbericht") gives information about teachers, students by grade, study
assignments, and the like. Not unexpectedly, 406 of the 565 students were
"mosaisch".
Because the report begins with an essay in Latin, the PDF is entitled
"Antiphontis esse orationem, quam editiones exhibit primam".
Oliver Bryk, San Francisco

Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech RE: Mattersburg/ Mattersdorf #Austria-Czech

Carole G. Vogel <carolevogel@...>
 

Dear Traude Triebel,

Thank you for posting this interesting document about Mattersdorf/Mattersburg.
Could you please provide the citation information,
i.e. title of the document, name of the author, name and location of
publisher, and publication date?

Thanks,
Carole Vogel
Lexington, Massachusetts
USA

-----Original Message-----
1. Mattersburg_Mattersdorf
From: "Traude Triebel" <traude.triebel@...>
Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2007 08:26:21 +0100

http://school4you.schulweb.at/real/1/doku/juden_im_raum_mattersburg.doc

on this site you will find: Jewish in and surrounding
Mattersdorf;Mattersburg

snip>>>>>>>>