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1910 Manhattan census - Seward Park Strollers #usa


Mary Henderson
 

Hi, all!

In the 1910 Manhattan census there are 2 supplementary sheets with a
list of men shown with relationship "partners" except the first person
listed on each page is shown as "head". Most show a birthplace of
"Russ Yiddish". Along the left margin is written "Seward Park
Strollers".

I am not permitted, by group restrictions to this list, to include the
links to view this census page, but can privately provide both an
Ancestry link and a FamilySearch link to this census page.

Does anyone know what "Seward Park Strollers" would represent? I've
Googled it, and only see a reference to a newspaper blurb in 1920
about a tailor attacking the Seward Park Strollers, but with nothing
else to indicate who the Seward Street Strollers are.

Thank you!

Mary Henderson


billie.stein@...
 

I haven't heard the term before, but the Seward Park Strollers were most likely homeless. Seward Park is on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, at Essex Street/East Broadway.

Billie Stein
Givatayim, Israel


Sherri Bobish
 


Mary,

If you give us one of the men's name, age, and birthplace (preferably a not too common name) than we can look at the 1910 census page.

At www.fultonhistory.com I found a mention in a 1903 NYC newspaper for an amateur baseball team called The Park Strollers.

Are there occupations listed for any of these men?  What is their age range?  Seeing the census sheet will be helpful.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Deanna Levinsky <DEANNASMAC@...>
 

A “stroller “ is also another name for a small baby carriage --
Deanna Mandel Levinsky

--
Deanna M. Levinsky, Long Island, NY


Mary Henderson
 

Hi, Sherri!

Thank you for your response!  A good person to search on would be Morris Mulbogart born 1892 in Manhattan Ward 10, in the 1910 census.  Occupations, marital status, immigration status all marked "Un".  About 95 men whose ages range from teens to 60s.  I suspect these are homeless men.   It's interesting about the baseball team, though.

Mary Henderson


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On Wed, Nov 18, 2020 at 2:14 PM Sherri Bobish <sherribob@...> wrote:

Mary,

If you give us one of the men's name, age, and birthplace (preferably a not too common name) than we can look at the 1910 census page.

At www.fultonhistory.com I found a mention in a 1903 NYC newspaper for an amateur baseball team called The Park Strollers.

Are there occupations listed for any of these men?  What is their age range?  Seeing the census sheet will be helpful.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Mary Henderson
 

...that's in the 1910 Manhattan census... not born in Manhattan...actually indexed as born in Austria...

Mary Henderson


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On Wed, Nov 18, 2020 at 4:55 PM Mary Henderson via groups.jewishgen.org <gengenres=gmail.com@...> wrote:
Hi, Sherri!

Thank you for your response!  A good person to search on would be Morris Mulbogart born 1892 in Manhattan Ward 10, in the 1910 census.  Occupations, marital status, immigration status all marked "Un".  About 95 men whose ages range from teens to 60s.  I suspect these are homeless men.   It's interesting about the baseball team, though.

Mary Henderson


Virus-free. www.avast.com

On Wed, Nov 18, 2020 at 2:14 PM Sherri Bobish <sherribob@...> wrote:

Mary,

If you give us one of the men's name, age, and birthplace (preferably a not too common name) than we can look at the 1910 census page.

At www.fultonhistory.com I found a mention in a 1903 NYC newspaper for an amateur baseball team called The Park Strollers.

Are there occupations listed for any of these men?  What is their age range?  Seeing the census sheet will be helpful.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Stephen Weinstein
 

On Wed, Nov 18, 2020 at 01:54 PM, Deanna Levinsky wrote:
A “stroller “ is also another name for a small baby carriage
Not really.  In a stroller, the baby sits upright and usually facing forward.  In a carriage, the baby lies down.  The difference isn't just size.  It's more like the difference between a chair and a bed.
 
--
Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, California, USA
stephenweinstein@...


Judy Floam
 

And generally, you use a carriage for a newborn or very young baby.  Once they learn to sit up, they “graduate” to a stroller, where they can see what’s going on (and which is much easier to collapse and store).

 

Judy Floam

Baltimore


Laurie Sosna
 

That part of the 1910 census covers Manhattan Ward 10, District 184, deep in the Lower East Side.
I looked up a few of the other addresses in that section and noticed that it includes the area around Seward Park.
There is a Seward Park Conservancy web site with some history and a contact form.
Maybe they can help?
If you find out who they are, maybe you could post it?

Laurie Sosna


Sherri Bobish
 


Hi Mary,

I looked at the 1910 census page.  It is fascinating!  All men, a very wide age range (the youngest being 15), and a lot of info left blank for all of them.  Interesting that at the top of the page where it asks for "name of institution" that Seward Park is written.

Also interesting is that the first man at the top of each of the two pages is labeled "head of household" and everyone else as "partner."

It does look like these were homeless men.  I tried to find some info on a few of them after 1910, but had no luck.

A short history of Seward Park at: https://www.sewardparkconservancy.org/past
mentions that NYC took over administration of the park in 1903. The Park included a running track.  In 1904, a Pavilion was built with a gym, meeting rooms and the first public bathhouse to be opened in a New York City park.

Please let us know if you learn anything more about this.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Mary Henderson
 

Hi, all!

Thank you for all the great responses!

Based on the reply from JewishGenner Sharon Frank, who observed - it
seems that the term "stroller" had at some point in time connoted a
"vagabond" or "loiterer" - I searched just on the term stroller and
see that the Merriam-Webster online dictionary shows one definition as
vagrant, tramp, so it would seem that these probably were men living
in the park.

From Sherri Bobish's post it sounds like there were lots of amenities
in the park, so I can see how it would have been an attractive place
for a homeless man.

I'll post if I find any new information.

Mary Henderson


azmyrna@...
 

They are not necessarily homeless.  I have been searching a Alex/Alexander Weber.  He is in the 1910 census twice!  He is one of the "Seward Street Strollers" and is also listed with his wife Mary living on 52 Sherrif Street.  I have tried over the years to find any reference to the Strollers to no avail.  He clearly wasn't homeless but he had no occupation and he died a year later so perhaps he have just "hung out" with others in the Park.  

Myrna Hewitt