2 questions #russia #records


Trudy Barch
 

1)   A child (twins) died at childbirth in the USA or Palastine around 1905. – We do not know the names or gender of the babies.   Would be there be any birth or death records?   How would I go about finding them?

 

2)  A cousin had a boyfriend or husband (family not sure) became pregnant 1919-1921 in Russia.  The man was shot by the Czars in front of the pregnant lady.   Is there anyway to find out his name and when exactly it happened?  It was the family secret never discussed.   The children quickly learned not to ask as it was sad memories to the elders. The elders are deceased now and the grandchildren would like to know more about this man.

 

Thank you for any suggestions/help that you can give me.

 

Happy Chanukah and early Happy New Year

 

Trudy Barch,  FLorida


Ina Getzoff
 

Trudy:
To answer your first question you indicate that the possibility of the twins that were
born was either in the uS or Palestine.  Since it was a "twins birth" do you know if both babies died or just one of the two? Also, if it was in the US you would need to at least know in which state these babies were born so you could start with that. I would also start with the person who shared this information with you and ask if they verified it. If they did is there was I call "collateral relatives" who might be able to give you some other information.
 
As far as your second question, you say that this man was shot by the Czars. There was only one Czar of Russia at a time. Since Russia is a big country the first thing you need to indicate is what year this incident happened and where in Russia. Secondly, knowing what year might help to know who the Czar was and where it happened. Again, it needs to be verified by the person that told you this. There are many family stories and they are not always accurate. I can tell you that Russia was involved in a war with Japan around 1903 and the Jewish soldiers who were in the "Czar's army" would end up serving for 25 years. 
 
Hope some of this helps to follow through.
Ina Getzoff
Delray Beach, Florida


Janet Furba
 

Hi ask the local birth, death, marriage registration office.

Janet Furba,
Germany


jbonline1111@...
 

My maternal grandparents' first child was stillborn in 1917.  My cousin's husband found a record of this in a NYC archive, though I am not sure which one. I think it was a burial record of stillborns, as best I recall. 

You will need to determine the location of the births.  You might start with looking for where the family lived at that time. Census records may help determine both location and names. Ships' manifests may also help.  Then you can look for birth and death records in that area.  Also check cemetery records for the deceased twin, after you find at least the family's last name and location. 

Best of luck.
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


rroth@...
 

From one pedant to another: there was no Czar in 1919, he abdicated in 1917. There was one ex-Czar, but not for much longer.

I think we can agree that if the original poster was as much of a stickler as you and I, she would have said "shot by the Czarists" or "by the White Army" or some such. Give her a break. : )

==========
Robert Roth
Kingston, NY
rroth@...


Shelley Mitchell
 

Regarding the twins, it is my understanding that in the US, Jews buried their stillborns. And it’s usually bear a parent. That being said, if there was no money for such a burial, a Jewish Burial Society may have done the burial. In that case, the gravesite may be no where near a parent. In any event, there should be a death certificate even if the baby was not named.


Shelley Mitchell, NYC 


michele shari
 

Hi trudy,
My great grandparents had a child die (stillbirth or a day or 2 later) and I found the record accidentally on familysearch.org when I was looking for more info on my great grandparents. It did give me the information for a cemetery, Silver Lake Cemetery in Staten Island, NY is where a lot of Jews and children were buried. To my surprise it was not in the same cemetery as my great grandparents or the rest of the family. The land for Silver Lake was donated. I contacted the cemetery and they said I had more information than they did and could not point me to a specific grave. Children were frequently buried between graves or in any available space. Markers were small and some may be illegible years later. Try plugging in the parents names on a random search on various sites and see what you find. Interestingly, when I found out this information and told my brother, he knew. My grandmother was very young at the time and she remembered the death and mentioned it just once to my brother but he didn't think of telling me and essentially forgot about it. 
Michele Farkas
Boynton Beach, FL (formerly NY)
Searching Farkas, Izsak, Weiszhauz, Tuaszig, Rosenfeld: Romania, Transylvania, Hungary
Searching: Kaufman, Horowitz, Gurvich, Leykin, Rosen: Minsk and NY