Topics

Cherkassy-Smela #Ukraine

Esther
 

I understand there is a list  about Smela, a suburb of Cherkaassy, Ukraine. I would like this list for my Cherkassy website. Thank you

 

assaf.patir@...
 

Hi,
I don't have the list for Smela, but I'm curious about your website. 
I have ancestors in Kaniv and the area (Rashba and Dogilevski/Dovgolevsky).
Assaf

assaf.patir@...
 

Hi,
I don't have the list for Smela, but I'm curious about your website. 
I have ancestors in Kaniv and the area (Rashba and Dogilevski/Dovgolevsky).
Assaf

justiceofp@...
 

Did you contribute to the latest Smela translation project?   I did, because we also had family from Cherkassy.
Linda Winkleman
Connecticut

Bella Tseytlin
 

Hi, and apologies for bothering you. 

What do you mean by list for Smela?  asking as I, myself, am interested in Uman, Cherkassy Region (and surrounds).


Thank you.

Regards,
Bella Tseytlin.


Esther
 

Shalom, I would like to receive more information about this :

"latest Smela translation project".

Thank you

 

ESTHER

 

Esther
 

My Cherkassy website- https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Cherkasy/default.asp

 

ESTHER

 

stvnrsnbrg@...
 

The you for the link and for your hard work on it. We could use one for the town of Smiela as well. 

Also what is the status of the Cherkassy Records Translation Project? 

With Best Regards.

Steven Rosenberg.

JudiZimmer
 

Hoping to find more information about my grandfather, Max Rothstein (Smela)His father and grandfather, Shlomo and Nachum (Rotshteyn), his uncle Shimon, Shimon's children Isaak, Shlomo, Max, Rosa and Riva. Also from Cherkassy, my great-grandmother Chaya Kosminsky, her parents Pincus and Bessie (obviously Anglicized), my great-uncle Nissen (Nathan) Kosminsky, my great-aunt  Chave Kosminsky, Nissen's wife Gittel Cherkasy and her parents, Jonah and Tolia Tovorovsky. As you can see, I have extensive family from both Smela and Cherkassy, but I think my grandfather Max must have had siblings and I'm trying to find them and their descendants. I remember an aunt, Tante Perel, but have no information about her, other than she was from his side of the family. I could never connect them as siblings.

Thanks,
Judi Rothstein Zimmer

JudiZimmer
 

Hoping to find more information about my grandfather, Max Rothstein (Smela)His father and grandfather, Shlomo and Nachum (Rotshteyn), his uncle Shimon, Shimon's children Isaak, Shlomo, Max, Rosa and Riva. Also from Cherkassy, my great-grandmother Chaya Kosminsky, her parents Pincus and Bessie (obviously Anglicized), my great-uncle Nissen (Nathan) Kosminsky, my great-aunt  Chave Kosminsky, Nissen's wife Gittel Cherkasy and her parents, Jonah and Tolia Tovorovsky. As you can see, I have extensive family from both Smela and Cherkassy, but I think my grandfather Max must have had siblings and I'm trying to find them and their descendants. I remember an aunt, Tante Perel, but have no information about her, other than she was from his side of the family. I could never connect them as siblings.

Thanks,
Judi Rothstein Zimmer

Jane Foss
 

Grandpa isidore cholodenko.gamily.from.cherkassy

sharon@...
 

I would also like to know what you are referring to when mentioning
“list for Smela”.  My Father’s family were all from Smela and
I have tried for year to get more information about Smela and
the residents.
 
Thank you,
 
Sharon Kushner   
Colorado Springs
 
Researching: ZAMANSKY, DOLINSKY, CHERKASSKY, ANNAPOLSKY

Moderator note: please respond back privately

Sol Sylvan
 

Yonah Sztencl

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Rabbi Yonah Sztencl
Yona S.jpg
BornAugust 3, 1904
DiedJuly 5, 1969 (aged 64)
Resting placeSmomrei Shabbos Cemetery, Bnei Brak, Israel
NationalityPolish, Israeli
OccupationRabbi
Known forFounder of the Mishnah Yomis and the Halacha Yomis
PredecessorNone (Founder)
SuccessorShlomo Sztencl (d. 2013)
Spouse(s)Sheva Fiszel
ChildrenShlomo Sztencl, Rachel Kalikstein, Esther Robinson
Parent(s)Shlomo Sztencl and Miriam Baila Zweigenhaft
RelativesUncle- Avrohom Nachum Sztencl

Rabbi Yona Sztencl (Hebrew: יונה שטנצל, pronounced Shtentzel) (1904–1969) was a Jewish Orthodox Rabbi who founded the Mishnah Yomis and the Halacha Yomis. He also served as the Rabbi of Congregation Bais Hassidim "Arlenger" in Tel Aviv and was a member of the Chief Rabbinate of Tel Aviv.

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, together with Rabbi Yona Shtencel founder Daily Halacha daily mishna
Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, together with Rabbi Yona Shtencel founder Daily Halacha daily mishna

[[קובץ:Chazon ish in tel aviv.jpg|ממוזער|שמאל|250px|החזון איש משמש כסנדק בברית מילה, תל אביב, סוף שנות ה-40]]

Family background[edit]

Sztencl was born in Sosnowiec, Poland on 3 August 1904 to Rabbi Shlomo and Miriam Baila Zweigenhaft. Sztencl was born into a rabbinical family. His father Shlomo was a Polish Orthodox Jewish rabbi who served as Chief Rabbi of Czeladź, Poland, and Rav, dayan, and rosh yeshiva of Sosnowiec, Poland. He also authored Koheles Shlomo[1] and Beis Shlomo. Sztencl's mother Miriam was the daughter of Rabbi Efraim Mordechai Mottel Zweigenhaft who served as a Posek and Shochet in Sosnowiec.[2]

Biography[edit]

In his youth Sztencl studied in Kraków, Poland. His study partner, Moshe Mordechai Biderman would later become Grand Rabbi of the Lelov dynasty. Thereafter, Sztencel was one of the first students to study in the famed Chachmei Lublin Yeshiva. In 1932, Sztencl married Sheva Fiszel, the daughter of a businessman in Sosnowiec. In 1935, Sztencl immigrated to Palestine and settled in Tel Aviv where, in addition to serving as the Rabbi of a local synagogue named "Bais Chassidim - Erlanger", he was appointed as a member of the Chief Rabbinate of Tel Aviv. Initially his duties involved overseeing the Kashrut in Tel Aviv, a position which he held jointly with Grand Rabbi Shemuel Eliyahu Taub of the Modzitz dynasty. Thereafter, Sztencl was appointed as the sole authority in Sabbath enforcement. After most of his family perished in the Holocaust, Sztencl created the Mishnah Yomis and the Halacha Yomis as a spiritual merit for the millions of deceased. These programs received overwhelming support from many Rabbinical authorities of the time, among them, Rabbi Isser Zalman Meltzer, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, Rabbi Avraham Mordechai Alter and Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson.[3]