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Yiddish in Czech lands -- and all over Europe - Breugus #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

I would like to contribute to the discussion on Yiddish in Bohemia and Moravia
[and Vienna], which was accidentally started when our knowledgeable
nona-genarian SIG member, Hans Weigl >from Breclav [Lundenburg], sent me a joke.

Breclav frontier/railway jokes were a genre well-known in his youth and now
sadly forgotten. They arose because of the severity of the customs officials at
this Moravian border town with Austria and the ingenious excuses [some in Yiddish,
of course] made by the Jewish railway passengers when challenged.

Animated discussion raged behind the Austria-Czech SIG scenes all this week,
culminating in John Freund's interesting posting and Michael Bernet's scholarly
reply.

Breclav/Lundenburg, naturally, is the birth place of Franz Josef BERANEK
[1902-1967], the author of the only scientific work on Yiddish dialects in
Czecho-slovakia. I expect he had heard all these railway jokes in his youth:
[ref in Czech only]. He is the author of "Die Mundart von Sudmahren".

http://www.holocaust.cz/cz2/resources/jcom/fiedler/jindrichuv_hradec

There are two Bohemian? Yiddish words to which I would like to give an airing
in my next posting - perhaps the first and last time they will ever appear in
cyber-space.

But first to the word "Breugus" which has always intrigued me and has an unusual
origin. I know it was used both by my father who hailed >from London [of Polish
lineage in the 1800s] and my mother's family with their Viennese, Pressburg,
Bohemian and Moravian ancestry. I never hear it used today in my circles
[perhaps the wrong ones?]; has it died out?

The word means "offended" or "beleidigt" in German and I have traced its origin
to the Italian "imbroglio" [a row]; however I always assumed it to be a yiddish
word which has established itself all over Central Europe and Jewish London.

It appears in this rather amusing discourse:

http://www.refsyn.org.uk/rsgb-artman/publish/printer_368.shtml

Celia Male [UK]

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

Celia, be assured that that lovely word "Breugus" has not died out. My
parents, >from Vienna and before that >from Moravia, used it, (although my
father would have pronounced in "broiges") and even my Wife, with a
Latvian/Russian/English/Australian heritage, uses it. Strangely, I can't
find it in Leo Rosten's The Joys of Yiddish.
Oy!

Robert W Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@...

-----Original Message-----
From: Celia Male [mailto:celiamale@...]
Sent: Monday, 14 February 2005 6:19 AM
To: Austria-Czech SIG
Subject: re:[austriaczech] Yiddish in Czech lands -- and all over Europe -
Breugus

snip>>But first to the word "Breugus" which has always intrigued me and has
an unusual
origin. I know it was used both by my father who hailed >from London [of
Polish
lineage in the 1800s] and my mother's family with their Viennese, Pressburg,
Bohemian and Moravian ancestry. I never hear it used today in my circles
[perhaps the wrong ones?]; has it died out?
snip>>>>
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jac_jam <jacjam_ros@...>
 

But first to the word "Breugus" which has always intrigued me and has an
unusual origin. I know it was used both by my father who hailed >from London [of
Polish lineage in the 1800s] and my mother's family with their Viennese,
Pressburg, Bohemian and Moravian ancestry. I never hear it used today in my circles
[perhaps the wrong ones?]; has it died out?

The word means "offended" or "beleidigt" in German and I have traced its
origin to the Italian "imbroglio" [a row]; however I always assumed it to be a
yiddish word which has established itself all over Central Europe and Jewish
London.
I think that word "breugus" is originaly hebrew "Be'Rogez" - in anger.

Jacob Rosenberg
Rehovot Israel

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 2/13/2005 7:42:43 PM Eastern Standard Time,
celiamale@... writes:

< But first to the word "Breugus" which has always intrigued me and has an
unusual origin. I know it was used both by my father who hailed >from London [of
Polish lineage in the 1800s] and my mother's family with their Viennese,
Pressburg, Bohemian and Moravian ancestry. I never hear it used today in my
circles [perhaps the wrong ones?]; has it died out?

< The word means "offended," or "beleidigt" in German, and I have traced
its origin to the Italian "imbroglio" [a row]; however I always assumed it to be
a yiddish word which has established itself all over Central Europe and
Jewish London. >

==It's in Weinreich's Yiddish dictionary as bet-resh-vav-gimmal-zayin
(spelled exactly like the Hebrew be-rogez meaning "in anger"), transliterated by
Weinreich as "broyges," and translated as "sore, angry, offended, sullen, cross."


==In Germany, where zayin was pronounced as S, the term used by Jews was
broges, sometimes broyges, sometimes bro-ches (except, of course, Frankfurt where
it was "bro-sches.")

==It is definitely and unquestionably >from the Hebrew.

==There's a rhyme in Hebrew recited by kids who've made up after a fight:
they do some hand gestures and say simultaneously: "Sholem, sholem kol hazman;
broygez, broygez af pa`am." (Peace, peace, all the time; angry, angry, never).

Michael Bernet, New York http://www.mem-ber.net/