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Czech search engine: Could ROZENBERK be a "sound-alike?" #austria-czech

HeyJudy123@...
 

My thanks to Tom Venetianer for the link to the Czech search engine that
provides biographies of prominent Czech citizens, dividing them into groupings
for the years before and after 1918.

Since I read no Czech, of course it was not possible for me to fully explore
the site. Still, as Tom had advised, it is easy to use the search engine
for surnames.

My question is this: ROZENBERG (or, obviously, ROSENBERG) is one of my
family's surnames.

These spellings did not show up on the search engine but, linked to several
different people, ROZEMBERK did appear.

Could ROZEMBERK possibly be a "sound-alike" for ROZENBERG?

Thanks,
Judy SEGAL
New York City, USA

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

Oh yeah, it could be! Final g's are "hard" in German - more like K than G...

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI

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My question is this: ROZENBERG (or, obviously, ROSENBERG) is one of my
family's surnames.

These spellings did not show up on the search engine but, linked to several
different people, ROZEMBERK did appear.

Could ROZEMBERK possibly be a "sound-alike" for ROZENBERG?

Buzaitis and Petersen <bubbeleh@...>
 

ROZMBERK is the Czech spelling for Rosenberg. They were quite a powerful
family in the 14th and 15th centuries in both Western and Southern Bohemia.
However, I don't know how generally prevalent the name was so I'm not sure
whether is was also prevalent among the not so powerful. If you let me know
any villages you are aware of privately to my e-mail above, I'd be happy to
point you toward any sources of which I am aware.

Dena (Simacek-Svajgr) Petersen

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Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

This subject line has now resulted in five postings on a relatively simple
linguistic problem. We should all now know that ROSENBERG and ROZENBERK/
ROZEMBERK are synonymous [although we cannot reproduce the diacriticals
in the Czech spellings].

I am not a Czech-speaker and do not wish to sound repetitive, but before
sending a message to the SIG one should always consult the message archives.
Many of the subjects which a new member may be researching {or alternatively
established members may be starting on a new aspect of their research} may
have been discussed before on our SIG which has been going strong for 8
years. We now have a vast store of data in the message archives.

I recently mentioned that the *Auschwitz suitcase story* was a subject
three Siggers had already tackled. Similarly, the ROSENBERG story could have
been solved by *two mouse clicks* by looking at the Austria-Czech message
archives where we have five postings which appear under a key word search
*ROSENBERG*.

One is entitled: The Jews of Rozmberk [Rosenberg], Bohemia and this
confirms Hanus Grab's reply today.

Using the Austria-Czech message archives, and if you wish to be more
thorough, all the other message archives, definitely enhances research
and results in far more interesting and informative postings. The leads
and head start one obtains >from the archives can be invaluable. One can
refer to previous postings as a reference but extensive re-quotes are
not permitted according to prevailing Jewishgen rules.

Sadly, Yad vashem also provides many clues, and here as a final say on
the subject, let us remember the one ROZENBERK/ROSENBERK listed on this
database:
Name: ROSENBERK Maximilian; DOB: 28/07/1903
Source: Terezinska Pametni Kniha/Theresienstaedter
Gedenkbuch, Terezinska Iniciativa, vol. I-II,
Melantrich, Praha 1995, vol. III Academia Verlag, Prag 2000
1st Transport: Transport Dc >from Praha to Terezin on 09/06/1943
2nd Transport Transport Ds >from Terezin to Auschwitz on 18/12/1943
Victim's status end WWII: Perished

We remember here today, through Max ROSENBERK >from Bohemia, all the
thousands of ROSENBERG of variant spellings - ROIZENBERG, ROZENBERG,
ROSENBERG, ROZEMBERK, ROSENBERK, ROZENBERK who lost their lives in
the holocaust.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Footnote: There is a direct link to our SIG message archives at the end
of our Austria-Czech homepage. The archives can be searched by date order
[to look for any postings you may have missed whilst away], keyword
or author.