Topics

online phone book #belarus


Greenpass@...
 

Adam,

Could you tell us which on-line telephone web site you used to find this
information.

Lillian Henking Greenberg
Bethesda, Md.

Researching: HENKIN/GENKIN ->Nevel/Vitebsk, St Petersburg, Belarus/Russia
MAGID ->Nevel/Vitebsk Belarus/Russia
ZELDA (ZINA) MAGID LIPMAN ->England
STVOLINSKY ->Nevel/Vitebsk Belarus/Russia
KWIATEK ->Lutostan, Lumza Poland
GREENBERG ->Pultusk, Poland, Brooklyn, NY


roman.vilner@...
 

I have already answered Adam's question privately, but
now see that others are interested in it as well. So,
to mail something to Russia one does not HAVE to put the
postal code on the letter. Don't get me wrong, it will
certainly help if you have one, but should you not have
it available, the letter will still get there. Absence
of the code will only cause a marginal delay in the
delivery time. The postal codes are of less importance
in Russia than the Zip codes here in the States mostly
because it's much harder to differentiate between
various towns in the US, as there are way too many with
the same names. It is not that much of a problem in
Russia, unless you are dealing with mailing something to
small villages. In this particular case be not afraid-
there is one Moscow and one St. Petersburg, so the
letter will get to your addressees.


hope it helps

Roman Vilner
Brooklyn, NY

------------------
Arlene Falkin wrote:
...snip...
I am eager to find the postal codes for both St. Petersburg
and Moscow. I researched the postal codes on the internet and I
found that as the Russian Federation is still organizing its
infrastructure there is not much information available (via the
web, the United Nations, or the US Postal Service).
...snip...
If anyone does locate the current postal codes for the Russian Federation
please share them.
------------------


ADAVIS <ADAVIS@...>
 

Wow- I just found 3 people with my Dobzhevich family name in Moscow using
the online phone book. That's a shock, but knowing that there were many
people who either evacuated to the Russian interior or served in the armed
forces during WWI, it makes sense..

If you use this great resource, be sure to click on the "translit" button as
it will assist their computers with the transliteration of english to
cyrillic characters for your search.

Now here's the question: Having a name, a phone number and a street address,
how does one figure out the postal codes for Moscow to write individuals a
letter? Thoughts>?


Adam Davis
Chicago


Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Wow!
I'm glad so many people have had great success with it.
I, however ironically, have not been able to get
anything >from it: Turning translit on and off,
resetting browser, inventing spellings of TALALAI/Y
which is a very phonetic name even in Russian! --
absolutely zilch, bupkas, kloom, heech, nada, etc.
Steve Gold suggested they might have unlisted numbers.
Don't think it works that way in former USSR, but who
knows? I KNOW there are several branches in each of
St.P and Moscow, so something should come up (I already
have information, am in contact with them, but am
looking for more) in one or both of them.
Oh well.
When Michael Gavrilovich who told me about it gets back
from St. Petersburg to his school in Illinois, he will
figure it out, unless someone else can try typing in
variants of TALALAI in English or Russian and
forwarding me the list if any information is
forthcoming.
Best wishes, and I am really glad that it works for
others.
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
dardasht@...


Andrew N Schwartz <andys@...>
 

I located how to address mail in the Russian Federation format: Reverse
the information order as we address it in the U.S. In other words,top
line is the addressee's name, then the postal code is first, then
town/city (second line), then the street, box, etc. address is the last line.
When I have sent mail to Russia, I have addressed the envelope in Russian
with the Cyrillic font, rather than in English with the Latin font. I
wonder if I really have to do this, whether it improves the reliability of
the letter reaching its destination.

... Andrew Schwartz, St. Louis, MO; researching ADASKIN


Andrew N Schwartz <andys@...>
 

I located how to address mail in the Russian Federation format: Reverse
>the information order as we address it in the U.S. In other words,top
>line is the addressee's name, then the postal code is first, then
>town/city (second line), then the street, box, etc. address is the last
line.

When I have sent mail to Russia, I have addressed the envelope in Russian
with the Cyrillic font, rather than in English with the Latin font. I
wonder if I really have to do this, whether it improves the reliability of
the letter reaching its destination.

... Andrew Schwartz, St. Louis, MO; researching ADASKIN


yelena.v.volk@...
 

Schelly,
Talalay is Талалай in Russian.
But I would recommend not using online databases (these are old databases), but searching by name on Facebook.

Sincerely,
Elena