MANDEL's #belarus


Lamdan <susan.lamdan@...>
 

Dear All,

I have been researching my MANDEL roots for almost two decades now and can
demonstrate (to my own satisfaction at least!) that:-

1. While there were plenty of Mandel's in German-speaking areas of 19th
century Europe as well as in Hungary and what became Czechoslovakia, there
were relatively few in that part of the Pale of Settlement which became
Belarus, Lithuania and Latvia.

2. Those very few who lived in Belarus (the Minsk Gubernya) were largely
concentrated in the Slutsk and Novogrudok Uezds.

3. These latter almost all stemmed >from a single family, who already
appeared in the1816-19 Revisions as "MANDEL"
(pure and simple - not Mendel, or Mandelbaum, or any other common
permutation).

By the turn of the 19th century, there was quite an extensive cousinhood of
these MANDEL's in the "old country",
but by the end of World War I, half of them (and their descendants) seem to
have disappeared into thin air.

The question is where the heck did they go to? And so my question to y'all
is do you have any Belarussian MANDEL's on your trees?

Anyone who has may hit a jackpot, because I have 200 years of documented
family history to share.

Please reply privately.

Neville Mandel-LAMDAN,
Vatican.

PS. Also searching ABELIANSKY, MLOTOK, PUZHARIK (various spellings),
STRELOVSKY and VOLOCHWIANSKY.


Anna Rozina
 

Hello! My name is Anna rosin. I am from Russia (Saint Petersburg). You are looking for ancestors from Belarus named Mandel. So, my maternal great-grandmother had the surname Mandel before her marriage and lived in the city of Mozyr (Belarus). After her marriage, she became Drabovskiy. Even before her marriage, her entire family moves around the world. And she alone remains in Mozyr. So we don't know anything about Mandel on her side. My great-grandmother Sara's name is Lea Simhovna Mandel (which means that her father's name was Simha(Simon) Mandel).
She was born in 1886 (Mazyr?) and died on 25.02.1978 in Leningrad. I married  in Mazyr with Yudel Drabovsky (my great-grandfather).I would be happy if there are any matches in the pedigree of Sarah Leia. But unfortunately, nothing is known about her origin, since her parents, brothers and sisters (how many of them were there?) all went abroad. And at that time, it was not possible to find out anything about them. 
 
Best regards
Anna


shirley@...
 

Dear Anna [from Russia] and Susan & Neville [Vatican], and extended JewishGen family,

Here is a bit about my Mandel side:  Israel Mandel, born 1875, son of Aaron Mandel and Ruth Smokler [Rochel Shmukler], all of Mir, Minsk Gubernia.

My great aunt Hannah [Chashke] married Israel Mandel in 1898 in MIR, which is near NOVOGRUDOK.  Her maiden name was DeMatoff [Dalmatovsky ?].  They came to Chicago in 1904 ? with two children.  Subsequently she had several more children with Israel, who was a bakery truck driver.

Israel's obituary [1942, Chicago] mentioned 5 siblings, presumably also born in or near Mir [also called Demir, I think].  These were Esther, Fannie, Celia, Benjamin, Elsie.  Some of them lived in Chicago, others in New York.

While we are at it, Hannah's mother was Sarah [Tchirke] Epstein, possibly also from Mir.

Any connections? 
Can anyone clarify why Mir is also called Demir?  Is one an earlier name for the town?  Or a Yiddish inflected version of the Russian name?

Shirley
California


Anna Rozina
 


Dear Shirley. Thank you for your response.

It is interesting to read about the fate of people named Mandel. After reading what you write, I try to meet the name Simon (Simcha) Mandel, (this is the father of my great-grandmother) because this is the only clue for me, in finding the branch of mandels that I am looking for. So far, I'm at the beginning of this path. It's not the first time I read that people named Mandel who lived in the late 19th and early 20th century moved to America, Canada, and Australia. So our family history says that all my great-grandmother's relatives left for these countries before her wedding. That's all, nothing else. There is hope for genetic analysis, which will help me in this issue. After reading the history of the city of Mir, I did not see any mention of it as Demir......Thank you again for your response.


 Anna (Sankt-Peterburg)


Понедельник, 9 марта 2020, 16:54 +03:00 от shirley@...:
Dear Anna [from Russia] and Susan & Neville [Vatican], and extended JewishGen family,

Here is a bit about my Mandel side:  Israel Mandel, born 1875, son of Aaron Mandel and Ruth Smokler [Rochel Shmukler], all of Mir, Minsk Gubernia.

My great aunt Hannah [Chashke] married Israel Mandel in 1898 in MIR, which is near NOVOGRUDOK.  Her maiden name was DeMatoff [Dalmatovsky ?].  They came to Chicago in 1904 ? with two children.  Subsequently she had several more children with Israel, who was a bakery truck driver.

Israel's obituary [1942, Chicago] mentioned 5 siblings, presumably also born in or near Mir [also called Demir, I think].  These were Esther, Fannie, Celia, Benjamin, Elsie.  Some of them lived in Chicago, others in New York.

While we are at it, Hannah's mother was Sarah [Tchirke] Epstein, possibly also from Mir.

Any connections? 
Can anyone clarify why Mir is also called Demir?  Is one an earlier name for the town?  Or a Yiddish inflected version of the Russian name?

Shirley
California


С уважением,
Анна Розина


jbonline1111@...
 

My 100 year old aunt by marriage is a MANDEL.  I was focused on my direct ancestors, so I have no information on hers, though I remember her father from when i was a child. I will call and ask her about her family's roots.  Her mind is as good as ever.  

quoted text: 
I have been researching my MANDEL roots for almost two decades now and can
demonstrate (to my own satisfaction at least!) that:-

1. While there were plenty of Mandel's in German-speaking areas of 19th
century Europe as well as in Hungary and what became Czechoslovakia, there
were relatively few in that part of the Pale of Settlement which became
Belarus, Lithuania and Latvia.

2. Those very few who lived in Belarus (the Minsk Gubernya) were largely
concentrated in the Slutsk and Novogrudok Uezds.

3. These latter almost all stemmed >from a single family, who already
appeared in the1816-19 Revisions as "MANDEL"
(pure and simple - not Mendel, or Mandelbaum, or any other common
permutation).

By the turn of the 19th century, there was quite an extensive cousinhood of
these MANDEL's in the "old country",
but by the end of World War I, half of them (and their descendants) seem to
have disappeared into thin air.

The question is where the heck did they go to? And so my question to y'all
is do you have any Belarussian MANDEL's on your trees?

Anyone who has may hit a jackpot, because I have 200 years of documented
family history to share.

Please reply privately.

Neville Mandel-LAMDAN,
Vatican.
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


jbonline1111@...
 

Since I replied to the group earlier, I will do so again.  My aunt told me that her MANDEL family is originally from Austria, so not closely linked to the Belarus MANDEL family.  FWIW, her father was Philip MANDEL from Austria and her mother Celia WEINSTEIN from Romania.  They lived for many years in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn and also had a hotel (name unknown) in the Catskills. 
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Deanna Levinsky <DEANNASMAC@...>
 

Hi BARBARA 
I am a Mandel. Family tree is on Ancestry. They go back to the late 1700’s in Rohatyn which was Austria and now Poland. Grandfather was Osias Mandel. They lived in Bridgeport CT and Brooklyn NY
--
Deanna M. Levinsky, Long Island, NY