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Translation of a name #belarus


hennynow
 

Hi, Carole,

Itka is a diminutive of the biblical name Yehudit (Judith), cf.
Bereishit, 26:34, in the Bible.

I found the information in a little book I consult daily, "Jewish
Personal Names: Their Origin, Derivation and Diminutive Forms," by the
late Rabbi Shmuel Gorr, edited by Chaim Freedman, 2nd printing,
published by Avotaynu. Copyright 1992 Avotaynu Inc. The publisher
gives permission to quote brief passages with proper attribution.

Henny
Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, CA
hennynow@pacbell.net


Alter & Dina Ophir <alterdina@...>
 

From: <mouallem@banet.net>
I just recently found out my Hebrew name and cannot find a translation
for it. Can anyone tell me what it translates to in english? The name
is Itka (aleph-yod-tet-qof-ayin). Thanks in advance.
Itke is in Yiddish, the closest English name would be Ida. Itke is
actually a deviation of Ida in Yidish

Alter Ophir


Norman H. Carp-Gordon <zerakodesh@...>
 

Itka is a Russianization of the Yiddish Itta or Etta. I'm not aware that
it means anything.

On Mon, 23 Oct 2000 12:34:35 -0400 mouallem@banet.net writes:

I just recently found out my Hebrew name and cannot find a
translation for it. Can anyone tell me what it translates to in
english? The name is Itka (aleph-yod-tet-qof-ayin).


MarkGrekin <markgrekin@...>
 

<< From: <mouallem@banet.net>
I just recently found out my Hebrew name and cannot find a translation
for it. Can anyone tell me what it translates to in english? The name
is Itka (aleph-yod-tet-qof-ayin). Thanks in advance. >>
I have an aunt (still alive, born 1916) whose given name is Itta and she
is known among friends under Russified name Ida.
Mark Grekin


Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Ida is Greek! It was a very high class name at the turn of the century.
When I was born, 1930, the German Jews were no longer naming their girls
Ida, but many Eastern European immigrants considered it a very high status
name for a girl whose Hebrew name was Haya.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: MarkGrekin [mailto:markgrekin@aol.com]
Sent: Wednesday, October 25, 2000 7:43 AM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Re: Translation of a name

<< From: <mouallem@banet.net>
I just recently found out my Hebrew name and cannot find a translation
for it. Can anyone tell me what it translates to in english? The name
is Itka (aleph-yod-tet-qof-ayin). Thanks in advance. >>
I have an aunt (still alive, born 1916) whose given name is Itta and she
is known among friends under Russified name Ida.
Mark Grekin
mailto:markgrekin@aol.com


Norman H. Carp-Gordon <zerakodesh@...>
 

Indeed, my Grand-aunt Ida, born in 1883 in Boston's north end community
of Litvaks, had Khaya for her Hebrew name.

On Thu, 26 Oct 2000 07:27:35 +0200 "Ida & Joseph Schwarcz"
<idayosef@barak-online.net> writes:

Ida is Greek! It was a very high class name at the turn of the
century.
When I was born, 1930, the German Jews were no longer naming their
girls
Ida, but many Eastern European immigrants considered it a very high
status
name for a girl whose Hebrew name was Haya.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel


Judith Romney Wegner
 

I just returned >from a Kindertransport reunion to discover the following
item in my e-mail:

Itka is a diminutive of the biblical name Yehudit (Judith), cf.
Bereishit, 26:34, in the Bible.
The undersigned Yehudit/Judith has no quarrel with the assertion about
Itka, but begs to differ vehemently about precisely which Yehudit is the
source of the popularity of this name among Jews. Jewish Judiths (like
myself) trace the origin of the name to the famous heroine Judith of the
Book of Judith in the Apocrypha (i.e., the Judith who slew Holofernes)
rather than to the Hittite woman mentioned at Genesis 26:34. Although the
apocryphal Judith is not mentioned in the actual Hebrew bible, the book
was originally written in Hebrew, so we know that she was a folk heroine
among Hebrew-speaking Jews and also appears in medieval Hebrew manuscripts.

The Yehudit of Gen. 26:34 was a *Hittite* woman married to *Esau*
(troublesome twin brother of Jacob). Esau is also known as Edom -- a
nation hostile to the Israelites -- and the name Edom later became a
metaphor for the Romans (first of the pagan persuasion, later of the
Christian persuasion anda metaphor for Christians in general). As for the
Hittites, the Torah lists them among the seven "Canaanite" tribes to be
driven out by the Israelites when they occupied Canaan.

Consequently, the popularity of the name Judith among Jews cannot possibly
be based on the Yehudit who was the wife of Esau -- while there is every
reason to suppose it stems originally >from the Apocryphal heroine. The
contrary assertion in the book by Rabbi Gorr cited by the sender of the
earlier message is simply without any logical basis.

Judith Romney Wegner


Judith Romney Wegner
 

Ida is Greek! It was a very high class name at the turn of the century.
When I was born, 1930, the German Jews were no longer naming their girls
Ida, but many Eastern European immigrants considered it a very high status
name for a girl whose Hebrew name was Haya.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel
The reason why Ida is commonly the secular name for a girl with the Hebrew
name Hayah ("living") is that Ida is popularly assumed to be a version of
Vida (Spanish version for the Latin word Vita, meaning "life."

Judith Romney Wegner


Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Mrs. Wegner's theory is quite interesting: IDA derives >from VIDA!?.
Why would the 'V' >from Vida be dropped is quite mysterious, specially
considering that IDA in Spanish means 'journey', so it's a word for
itself, not much to do with 'life'. According to sources of certain
reputation, IDA is originally a Norman name, of Germanic origin. The
name is also associated with mount IDA in Crete.
Thanks
Tom

At 00:00 -0500 31.10.00, JewishGen Discussion Group digest wrote:
>| Subject: RE: Translation of a name
>| From: Judith Romney Wegner <jrw@Brown.edu>
>| Date: Mon, 30 Oct 2000 17:45:48 -0400
>| X-Message-Number: 23
>|
>| >Ida is Greek! It was a very high class name at the turn of the century.
>| >When I was born, 1930, the German Jews were no longer naming their girls
>| >Ida, but many Eastern European immigrants considered it a very
high status
>| >name for a girl whose Hebrew name was Haya.
>| >Ida Selavan Schwarcz
>| >Arad, Israel
>|
>| >
>| The reason why Ida is commonly the secular name for a girl
with the Hebrew
>| name Hayah ("living") is that Ida is popularly assumed to be a
version of
>| Vida (Spanish version for the Latin word Vita, meaning "life."
>|
>| Judith Romney Wegner

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Sandra G Shapiro <sgshapiro@...>
 

Siggies:
I have a Rrussian document with the name "Dushka". How is that translated
into a "Jewish" name? David?
Thanks.

Sandra Garfinkel Shapiro, Wilsonville, Oregon
Researching: GARFINKEL, GOLDSMITH, TENENBAUM, KRASELSKI, LITVINSKI, GOLDBERG
all >from Divin
LEVY, KLYN >from Kortilisy
sgshapiro@comcast.net