Topics

Origins of people around the world #dna


Jeff Malka <malkajef@...>
 

I heard on CNN about a project to determine the distant origins
of peoples around the world using DNA. Are you involved in this
world-wide project and would it provide useful additional data to
the genealogical DNA research you do?

Thanks.

Jeff Malka


Matteson Richard <dickmatt@...>
 

On 2005.04.14, Jeff Malka <malkajef@orthohelp.com> writes:

I heard on CNN about a project to determine the distant origins
of peoples around the world using DNA. Are you involved in this
world-wide project and would it provide useful additional data to
the genealogical DNA research you do?
You bet!! Y-DNA and mtDNA analysis plus matching up persons of the
same or very similar genetic structure can nearly break open knotty
paper data "brick walls!"

I found an exact match person for my mother's mtDNA which I carry a
copy of along with my own Y--DNA. That lady and I have gone back
mother to mother to North Sweden where they apparently had lived in
about 1760- before my mother's branch came to the US in about 1770.
The daughter in that family was my great to the 3rd grandmother, the
matching lady's great grandmother came to the US about 1840. The
thing was, in the beginning we were so puzzled because our shared
mtDNA had been researched to having "beginning " in Central/North
**Finland**. The town in North Sweden was made up of many
**Finnish** families that had come to Sweden as iron and steel
workers in the early 1500s!! Almost an unreal association, for my
great to the 3rd grandmother was married in SC in 1808 and appeared
then to be an old SC family type.

I also discovered that my father - a first generation Swede in the
US - has been traced back to the water, in this case, the Bering
Sea, and there were two families, each headed by an Eric Ericson in
1690 in the very same town in North Sweden as above - Kopperburg!!
My Y-DNA said that I was of **Finnish** stock. I told my cousin in
Sweden, and he marvelled, that now we know that it was the Finnish
Eric Ericson that were should now follow!! Stunning help >from the
genes!

Also, I have found other near matches of my Y-DNA that show that my
gene array is also held by at least 60 percent of several isolated
Siberian tribes and one Jew of Polish ancestry. There are now hints
that my gene descent may well have come through the migration path
from the Eastern Mediterranean along the Altai mountains to the far
northeast of Siberia, went across the Bering Straits probably around
30,000 years ago and left genes there but returned to Siberia and
gradually went northwest through what is now Russia to central
Finland as the glaciers retreated in about 9,000 year ago.
Eventually the genes came to me >from there...

Much of this is conjecture, of course, but facts are there also! My
wife's mtDNA study was equally enlightening ... but I must defer to
the late hour....

Dick Matteson College Park, MD


ben.forman <ben.forman@...>
 

On 2005.04.14, Jeff Malka <malkajef@orthohelp.com> writes:

I heard on CNN about a project to determine the distant origins
of peoples around the world using DNA. Are you involved in this
world-wide project and would it provide useful additional data to
the genealogical DNA research you do?
Guys

Links for further info can be found here:

http://www5.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/atlas.html

http://www.waittfoundation.org/past/Genographic.html

Ben Forman


Martin Fischer
 

On 2005.04.14, Jeff Malka <malkajef@orthohelp.com> wrote:
I heard on CNN about a project to determine the distant origins
of peoples around the world using DNA. Are you involved in this
world-wide project and would it provide useful additional data to
the genealogical DNA research you do?
Jeff,

The project you heard about on CNN is sponsored by the National
Geographic Society. As I understand it, it is basic research to
uncover new information on prehistoric immigration patterns. Whether
it will contribute to our personal genealogical knowledge is unclear
to me.

For more information on this project, see the NGS Web site at:

http://www5.nationalgeographic.com/genographic/

(As a disclaimer, I have no personal interest or involvement in the
National Geographic Society or their research projects.)

Martin Fischer
Oak Park, Illinois


Jeff Malka <malkajef@...>
 

On 2005.04.14, I wrote:

I heard on CNN about a project to determine the distant origins
of peoples around the world using DNA. Are you involved in this
world-wide project and would it provide useful additional data to
the genealogical DNA research you do?
Thanks for all who replied. I have followed the links provided and
will follow with interest.

Jeff Malk


SJR1126935@...
 

DNA Genners-

I just wanted to add to the previous discussion about the "mapping" of
genes around the world.

There is a book which delves quite deeply into these subjects. It was
discussed last fall on CSPAN Book TV.

It is very easy reading and has maps and diagrams to help the reader
understand.

Title: The Journey of Man
Subtitle: A Genetic Odyssey
Author: Spencer Wells
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
ISBN: 0-8129--7146-9

Shalom,

Sam Richelew
Southfield, Michigan

JewishGen Researcher No. 46203, Researching:
RICHELEWSKI, RISHELEWSKI, RICHELEWSKY of Porozovo, Svisloch [Grodno
??], Belarus / [Bialystok ??] Poland
SHEVELEVICH, etc. of Porozovo, Svisloch [Grodno ??] Belarus /
[Bialystok ??] Poland and Israel (Haifa, etc.)
MOSES, MOSESCO, MOSESCU of Piatra, Neamt, Romania
MARKOWITZ, MARKOVITZ, MARKOURITZ of Piatra, Neamt, Bucharest, Romania

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