Need Books/Articles w/ basics #dna


Danielle James <daniandw@...>
 

I had a Jewish father and Gentile mother. I believe that, being a
woman, I only inherit the DNA code >from my mother. That there would
be no evidence of my father's DNA.

However, on a recent TV program, a girl born through the IVF program
(her mother being the recipient of male donor sperm) traced her
father through a half-brother - different mother, but same father.
This was proven conclusively through a DNA test.

How would this be possible if the DNA line is only perpetuated from
mother to daughter, father to son.

I would appreciate information about this - even advice on books to
read.

Sincerely

Danielle James
daniandw@chariot.net.au

[Moderator's Note: You may want to check the resources cited at
the bottom of the webpage at http://www.ftdna.com/dna101.html ]


garymaher@...
 

On 2005.11.05, Danielle James <daniandw@chariot.net.au> asked:

I had a Jewish father and Gentile mother. I believe that, being a
woman, I only inherit the DNA code >from my mother. That there would
be no evidence of my father's DNA.

However, on a recent TV program, a girl born through the IVF program
(her mother being the recipient of male donor sperm) traced her
father through a half-brother - different mother, but same father.
This was proven conclusively through a DNA test.

How would this be possible if the DNA line is only perpetuated from
mother to daughter, father to son.
You get about half of your DNA >from your mother and half >from your
father. That's how you get some attributes >from each of them.

The tests most commonly conducted for genealogical purposes are the
Y-DNA and mtDNA.

The Y-DNA test examines certain portions of the Y Chromosome, which
men inherit >from their fathers. Women have two X Chromosomes and no
Y Chromosome, so the Y-DNA test is useless to them. Because men get
their Y-DNA >from their fathers with no interference >from the mother,
Y-DNA can remain the same over many generations, making this test
ideal for determining whether two men are related through their
paternal lines.

The mtDNA test focuses on sections of the Mitochondrial DNA.
Mitochondria are tiny objects contained within our cells that oddly
enough have their very own DNA. Men and women inherit Mitochondrial
DNA >from their mothers with no interference >from their fathers. So
this test is to the maternal line what the Y-DNA test is to the
paternal line. The difference is that the test subjects can be
males or females, as long as there are only females connecting them.

As I said above, these are the tests that are most commonly
conducted. However, examining other areas of your DNA can determine
how related you are to others outside your maternal and paternal
lines. Maybe this sort of test would be of help to you.

Gary Maher
NJ / USA


Elzbieta Kniaz
 

On 2005.11.08, Gary Maher <garymaher@juno.com> wrote:

The tests most commonly conducted for genealogical purposes are the
Y-DNA and mtDNA.
The Y-DNA test examines certain portions of the Y Chromosome, which
men inherit >from their fathers. [...]
The mtDNA test focuses on sections of the Mitochondrial DNA. Men
and women inherit Mitochondrial DNA >from their mothers with no
interference >from their fathers [...]
I also had a Jewish father and Gentile mother. If the Y-DNA test is
for the male only side and the mtDNA test deals with the males and
females on the mother's side, how do I get tested for my father's
DNA? I am a female two XX chromasomes, no brother or other male
relative on my fathers side. Mother a gentile.

How do I get DNA information >from my fathers side? My father died
in 1962.

Ela Kniaz - England


DonnDevine@...
 

On 2005.11.11, Elzbieta Kniaz <kniaziniaela@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

I also had a Jewish father and Gentile mother. If the Y-DNA test is
for the male only side and the mtDNA test deals with the males and
females on the mother's side, how do I get tested for my father's
DNA? I am a female two XX chromasomes, no brother or other male
relative on my fathers side.
Ela, you'll need to find a male >from your father's surname line --
an uncle, male cousin, or if none are available, a more distant
cousin, descended in the surname line >from your paternal
great-grandfather. Many of us have gone that route. I've found
appropriate male or female cousins to provide samples representative
of six of my eight great-grandparents, but the other male and female
line died out before my time.

Donn Devine, CG, CGI
Wilmington, Delaware, USA
Administrator of two DNA surname projects


garymaher@...
 

On 2005.11.11, Elzbieta Kniaz <kniaziniaela@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

I also had a Jewish father and Gentile mother. If the Y-DNA test is
for the male only side and the mtDNA test deals with the males and
females on the mother's side, how do I get tested for my father's
DNA? I am a female two XX chromasomes, no brother or other male
relative on my fathers side.
Go back another step.

Did your father's father have any brothers? Do those brothers have
living male-line descendants?

If not, go yet another step back. It may take a lot of tracing up
and down the tree, but eventually you'll have a male-line relative
of your father's to test.

Gary Maher
NJ / USA