Deportation lists from France... #france


Rosanne D. Leeson <leeson1@...>
 

The following message is reprinted with permission >from "Nu? What's
New?",
the Internet e-zine published by Avotaynu. Free subscriptions are
available at: http://www.avotaynu.com>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Deportations >from France during the Holocaust
=============================================
Many of us occasionally key our surname into a major search engine like
Google in the hope of getting interesting hits. Last week, using Google,
I stumbled onto a site that lists more than 19,400 persons, mostly Jews,
who were deported to their deaths >from France during World War II.

The list was compiled by Daniel Carouge >from official French government
lists that have been published on the Internet at

http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/html/accueil.htm.

At that site, click "Le Journal officiel" Then use the search
engine (Recherche par des mots). Enter the key words
"mort en deportation" and click "Valider". It will identify 91
documents; each contain names of deported people including their date
and place of birth as well as probable date and place of death.

Carouge has combined these lists into a single database and organized
the list in two sequences: according to place of birth and
alphabetically.
The links to the two lists are at
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/petit-chemin/Histoire/Accueil.htm.

The list by place of birth (Liste des morts en deportation dans le
J.O. de 1991 a 2001 par pays ou departement) is incomplete.
The alphabetical list (Liste des morts en deportation dans le
J.O. de 1991 a 2001 par ordre alphabetique) is complete.

The usual source of the names of Jews deported >from France is the book
"Memorial to the Jews Deported >from France (1942-1944)," by Serge
Klarsfeld. It identifies more than 80,000 Jews transported on
70 train convoys, mostly to their deaths at Auschwitz. The book
is organized by date of deportation; therefore, to find an individual,
it is necessary to go through the 70 lists. Avotaynu publishes on
microfiche an alphabetical index to the surnames in the book identifying
which convoys have which surnames.

Information about the microfiche can be found at:
http://www.avotaynu.com/microf.htm under the Holocaust category. A more
detailed description of the Klarsfeld book can be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/FR-klars.txt.

The lists above contain names not found in Klarsfeld.
--
Rosanne Leeson
Los Altos, CA USA
Leeson1@attglobal.net


Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

At 12:46 -0700 10/09/2002, Rosanne D. Leeson wrote (about deportation lists)

The list was compiled by Daniel Carouge >from official French government
lists that have been published on the Internet at

http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/html/accueil.htm.

This information needs some complement :

1) Daniel Carouge was completely right to publish these lists which
remain almost unknown even here, in France.

2) Nevertheless, unfortunately he could publish only the computerized
part of these lists, i.e. >from 1990. There were still more >from 1987,
but only a "paper version".

3) Everyone must be aware that the French "Ministere des Anciens
Combattants" (Veterans Ministry) published a special law, in 1985,
saying that every death certificate for deportees had to contain the
mention "mort en deportation" (died in deportation), and that the
death is supposed to have occurred five days after the departure >from
France. The employees of that Ministry had to correct each
certificate, one by one.

Seventeen years later, that work is not completely done !!! That's
why the lists published by the friendly Daniel Carouge are not
complete. For example, my own father (deported in May 1944) isn't
still listed in it. Different persons tried to obtain that this work
could be quickly done, but to no avail until now.

Daniel Carouge's work lists 19 400 names : there were about 75 000
Jewish deportees and probably as many non Jewish deportees...

Moreover, since the death of deportees was falsely written
(immediately after WWII) as "died in Drancy, France", the Ministry
had to rectify all the death certificate. That work was done as badly
as possible and quite a lot of certificate are still wrong. For
example, my mother's date of death is wrong.

This is why you mustn't be surprised if you don't find the person you
are looking for, or if the date doesn't correspond to the one you may
have already obtained.
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org