German script #germany


Vivian Salama <vivsalama@...>
 

I am wondering if there is a course to learn to read German script
(handwriting).

Vivian Brieger Salama, Hillsborough, CA vivsalama@gmail.com


David Bernheim
 

Vivian Salama idea (yesterday) for a course on reading German
handwriting sounds excellent. I would love this too!

The idea is so good, I wish I had thought of it a long time ago!

I am wondering if there is a course to learn to read German script
(handwriting).
David Bernheim, St Martin Vesubie, France david@bernheim.net


Emily Garber
 

The FamilySearch Learning Center is a go-to place for learning to read
script in other alphabets. I used lessons they provide for learning
Polish and Cyrillic scripts. They also have a German script lesson at:
https://familysearch.org/learningcenter/lesson/german-script-tutorial/91

Emily Garber, Phoenix, AZ emilyhgarber@gmail.com


Fritz Neubauer
 

Vivian Salama vivsalama@gmail.com asked:
I am wondering if there is a course to learn to read German script
(handwriting). =========>
Dear Vivian,

I relatively cheap (about 15 $) small book with many examples >from
different times is available (I assume also through a known book
distributor)

Deutsche Schreibschrift: Lehrbuch Gebundene Ausgabe – 2004
by Harald Süß
<http://www.amazon.de/Harald-S%C3%BC%C3%9F/e/B00J25O4R4/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1>
(Autor)
ISBN 3426667533

Hope that helps

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de

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<http://www.amazon.de/Deutsche-Schreibschrift-Lehrbuch-Harald-S%C3%BC%C3%9F/dp/3426667533/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1437471521&sr=1-1&keywords=9783426667538#customerReviews>


Roger Lustig
 

If you read German already, it's just a matter of practice. One way
might be to download a German-script font such as Wiegel Kurrent, then
produce side-by-side versions of a document. Print out an alphabet sheet
first.

There are a few quirks, notably the horizontal line over an n or an m,
which doubles the letter. Double-s in all its variations (short-long,
long-long, Esszett) requires some attention too. And then there's the
curl over the u to distinguish it >from an n--not an umlaut!

If you don't read German, it's going to be more difficult. However, many
German vital records put surnames in Latin script, and some do the same
for given names and/or dates. It was often standard to put Latinate
words in Latin letters in both handwriting and type.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ eyestrain coordinator, GerSIG

On 7/20/2015 5:59 PM, Vivian Salama vivsalama@gmail.com wrote:
I am wondering if there is a course to learn to read German script
(handwriting).


Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer
 

I have long had a theory about learning to read German script. I
haven't yet tried it out myself, but I passed it on to a friend, and
it worked for her. My theory is that one needs to learn to write in
German script to be able to understand it well and read it.

Depending on how much you want to read, you might want to buy the book:
If I Can You Can Decipher Germanic Records, by Edna M. Bentz. It's
specifically written for genealogists.

It's available for sale on Amazon.com for $17.25. She gives a few
examples of ways German script alphabets can be written, and also
gives pages and pages of examples of different words (names,
occupations, born, died, married, buried, etc.) a genealogist might
encounter, so you can compare them with something you're trying to
read.

Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer, Hyde Park, NY christine3cats@gmail.com
Author of: Long-Distance Genealogy: Researching Your Ancestors >from Home