Name changes #germany


Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

You don't say where your family lived, but in Russia and Russian Poland,
surnames were taken in 1826 and were very fluid in the 1830's. So Kalman
may have taken the last name SZMETERLING. The birth is for Jacob who's
Father was Kalman (Kalmanowicz is a patronymic)-possibly the same Kalman
SZMETERLING, but we are not sure >from what is given. Jacob could have used
the patronymic as his surname, which was common.

Hopefully, if this is a very small town, there wouldn't be more than one
Kalman to confuse the situation!

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY


Stan Hart <stanhart@...>
 

There was the case of two Borochowitz brothers landing in South Africa from
the Heim. The first one ended with the name Brock and the other became
Witz. Both families lived in Durban for many years and still some residing
here.

Another example, SMOLENSKY became SMO and SMOLLY.

Did the Moffs family >from Pretoria also change their name >from Mofsowitz?

Stan Hart

Researching : HART, SNAPPER, SANDLER, FURMAN, JOFFE, SMOLENSKY, BROOK
(BRUK), ROCK, WOLK


Jordan Auslander <jausland@...>
 

There are several gazetteers listing present and former nawes of
pre-Trianon (1920) Hungarian localities.

One of the best I've seen is . Magyar Helysegnev-Azonosito Szotar (1992
&1998 ed.) by Gyorgy Lelkes. Another I haven't seen is Magyar Helyseg
Nev, by Pal Kosa 1000 page gazeteer, published in Hungary

Last month in Budapest I picked up a copy of:
A Történelmi Magyarország Atlasza és adattára 1914 (Atlas & Gazetteer of

Historic Hungary 1914). by Talma Kiadó published 2001, Pécs.
ISBN 963 85683 3 X.

While it does have some general demographics there are no town
populations or breakdowns. It has contemporary names and some nice
1:400,000 sectional maps of the old counties, no overlay with new
borders however. I got it at Fókusz bookstore, a Hungarian chain.
www.fo.hu or email a query to info@fo.hu

Specifically geared to gealogists is my translation and alphabetization
of the 1877 Hungarian Gazetteer (Janos Dvorzsak, Magyarorszag
Helysegnevtar (1877) FHL#6000840, [Gazetteer of Hungary] Budapest: Havi
Füzetek, 1877), also includes the current names as well as listing the
1877 populations by religious affiliation and where each worshipped. I
have submitted this to my publisher but cannot, at this point estimate
when it will be available.

Jordan Auslander


Debra Heath <gaheath@...>
 

Dear Jordan, Does this mean anything to you about these Auslanders of
Porosko? Lali,Marcus,Helen and Rose Auslander? Marcus Auslander lived =
at
one time at 619 5th Ave.in Brooklyn, NY. Lali came here. Debra

-----Original Message-----
From: Jordan Auslander [mailto:jausland@pipeline.com]=20
Sent: Friday, April 25, 2003 10:20 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Re:Name changes


There are several gazetteers listing present and former nawes of =
pre-Trianon
(1920) Hungarian localities.

One of the best I've seen is . Magyar Helysegnev-Azonosito Szotar (1992
&1998 ed.) by Gyorgy Lelkes. Another I haven't seen is Magyar Helyseg =
Nev,
by Pal Kosa 1000 page gazeteer, published in Hungary

Last month in Budapest I picked up a copy of:
A T=F6rt=E9nelmi Magyarorsz=E1g Atlasza =E9s adatt=E1ra 1914 (Atlas & =
Gazetteer of

Historic Hungary 1914). by Talma Kiad=F3 published 2001, P=E9cs. ISBN =
963 85683
3 X.

While it does have some general demographics there are no town =
populations
or breakdowns. It has contemporary names and some nice 1:400,000 =
sectional
maps of the old counties, no overlay with new borders however. I got it =
at
F=F3kusz bookstore, a Hungarian chain. www.fo.hu or email a query to
info@fo.hu

Specifically geared to gealogists is my translation and alphabetization =
of
the 1877 Hungarian Gazetteer (Janos Dvorzsak, Magyarorszag Helysegnevtar
(1877) FHL#6000840, [Gazetteer of Hungary] Budapest: Havi F=FCzetek, =
1877),
also includes the current names as well as listing the 1877 populations =
by
religious affiliation and where each worshipped. I have submitted this =
to
my publisher but cannot, at this point estimate when it will be =
available.

Jordan Auslander


Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

If I decided to call myself 'John Doe', I would tell you to call me John.
Lots of entertainers do this - you see one name in Lights on Broadway, but
they are something else in 'real life'. Is this a name change? It used to
happen this simply in the US: someone would decide to be 'John Doe' and that
was their real name.

When Social Security started, that changed. You could have friends call you
John, but for anything legal, you had to get a court order or marriage or
divorce papers - something legal - before you could change your Social
Security Account, your driver's license, or your credit cards to your new
name. I know 'cause I've been there, and my divorce papers spelled my name
wrong, even though I spelled my name in court. Imagine, the court reporter
couldn't get the spelling of Bruckheimer right, so I had to get it fixed!

Sally Bruckheimer
Bridgewater, NJ


Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Sally Bruckheimer" < sallybru@verizon.net > wrote in message
news:005601c5b601$7126fc10$2f01a8c0@sal...

If I decided to call myself 'John Doe', I would tell you to call me John.
Lots of entertainers do this - you see one name in Lights on Broadway, but
they are something else in 'real life'. Is this a name change? It used
to happen this simply in the US: someone would decide to be 'John Doe' and
that was their real name.

When Social Security started, that changed. You could have friends call
you John, but for anything legal, you had to get a court order or marriage
or divorce papers - something legal - before you could change your Social
Security Account, your driver's license, or your credit cards to your new
name. I know 'cause I've been there, and my divorce papers spelled my
name wrong, even though I spelled my name in court. Imagine, the court
reporter couldn't get the spelling of Bruckheimer right, so I had to get
it fixed!
My father calls himself Paul Simon Landau (I have made up these names, but
otherwise this is true) and he has called himself that >from the year dot.

Not so long ago, he looked on his birth certificate and found that, in fact,
he was names had been registered as Simon Paul, the other way around.

His parents had forgotten this, he never knew this, and it can't have
created any complications in his life, because, as I say, he just found
about it by accident.

I agree that a reversal of names is not having totally different names.

It has created no complications for him.

It is just conceivable that if he had been born in this digital age it would.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland)
WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany) KOHN (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany)
LANDAU/FREDKIN(Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus)


Judith Romney Wegner
 

Ted Kotzin wrote:

One reason that Jews, as well as others, changed their names is
reflectedin this song, which goes back to about the time of the
California Gold Rush. The best known verse goes:

Oh, what was your name in the States?
Was it Thompson or Johnson or Bates?
Did you murder your wife and fly for your life?
Say, what was your name in the States?
Dear Ted Kotzin,

I would be very surprised if the proportion of Jews who murdered
people during the Gold Rush was anywhere close to the "average" in
the various ethnic populations as a whole. Apart >from anything
else, even though tempers may have flared up frequently among the
prospectors themselves, the principal connection of Jews to the Gold
Rush (both in USA and in Australia and New Zealand -- and presumably
also in South Africa) was not as prospectors but as peddlers or small
storekeepers, who made their living by supplying the needs of miners
and prospectors living in the Gold Rush townships.

As is well known, the actual reason why so many Jews changed their
names after moving to western European countries -- or England or USA
-- was purely and simply to avoid being disadvantaged by
anti-Semistism. A Jewish name stuck out like a sore thumb -- except
of course in USA, a country of immigrants >from everywhere, with phone
books full of German and Polish surnames, among others (which
explains why the number of American Jews who bothered to change their
names is far smaller proportionately than elsewhere -- at least in
the case of Jews wrote retained their affiliation to Jewish
institutions..

But in Britain and Western Europe, at least until the late 20th
century when large populations of non-Europeans moved into those
countries, if one opened a telephone book in any city or town, a
non-British (or non-French, etc.) name was so rare that it stood out
from the rest -- and this was especially true of Jewish names.
Everyone would know or at least might guess that this person was a
Jew. Parents simply didn't want their children impeded in their
educational or employment opportunities because of anti-Semitism, so
they often anglicized their names. It is as simple as that, and
that was certainly the reason that my father's family changed their
name >from Rumianek to Romney. I am frankly astonished at the
suggestion that Jewish name-changing may have had anything do with
criminal behavior, except in a negligible number of cases. In fact,
most of us know about the few Jewish organized crime figures like
Bugsy Siegel and Meyer Lansky precisely because they had *not*
changed their Jewish surnames.

Judith Romney Wegner


tedk4713@earthlink.net <tedk4713@...>
 

One reason that Jews, as well as others, changed their names is reflected
in this song, which goes back to about the time of the California Gold
Rush. The best known verse goes:

Oh, what was your name in the States?
Was it Thompson or Johnson or Bates?
Did you murder your wife and fly for your life?
Say, what was your name in the States?

Ted Kotzin

tedk4713@earthlink.net


David Kravitz
 

Saul Goldstone asked:
My grandfather Jacob changed his surname >from KURTZ to GOLDSTONE in
Manchester, England around 1890. Does anyone know where the records
of this change would be recorded and how I would go about getting copies
of this change?
At the National Archive in Kew, London are deed poll ledgers where people
changed their names via the courts. Both old and new names are listed twice
allowing searching by old or new. The records are mainly hand-written and
sorted only by initials of surname until very recent years. As Harvey Kaplan
pointed out, you can try the National Archive online,
http://tinyurl.com/3xpkqa

It was not a legal requirement to change your name via the court. You could
advertise in a local paper “that >from this day on, I wish to be known
as....”. Or merely adopt a name. In my case I dropped my middle name in 1975
and in both cases you can use the change on legal documents after a period
of seven years. My current British and Israeli passports show no middle
name. Many of the deed poll changes were reported in the London Gazette, an
old newspaper and these records may be traceable online. Try Google.

David Kravitz
Netanya, Israel,


joyweave
 

I know of Taubes who became Dora (later Dorothy) and
Tillie (later Matilda).

Don't know if that helps.

Joy Weaver

I feel 2 of my relatives who came to the U S in the 1890's might
have changed there given names. Their first names when they arrived
were Toyva and Taube. Anyone have any thoughts on what the
Americanized versions might be.
itisruth@comcast.net


Wegner, Peter
 

Ruth asked:

"I feel 2 of my relatives who came to the U S in the 1890's might
have changed there given names. Their first names when they arrived
were Toyva and Taube. Anyone have any thoughts on what the
Americanized versions might be. "
itisruth@comcast.net

While no one can say with certainty, popular "westernizations" of the
name Taube include Toby and Toni (Antonia), while the name Toyva (which
means literally "Goody" -- based on the Hebrew adjective "tov") is
often translated as "Bonnie" (which comes >from the French word for
"good"). The name Tova itself is a Hebraization of the Yiddish girl's
name Gitel ("good little girl") -- so one might also look for a
possible anglicized form like "Gita." My gg grandmother Gitel took
the English name Juliet as a "soundalike" so that's another possibility
for Toyva.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


Roger Lustig
 

Do you mean, in Israel? In the US? Someplace in Europe? In the 20th century?
Before then?

Naming practices, legal restrictions, record-keeping and archival preservation have
all varied greatly over time and place.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

Yonatan Ben-Ari wrote:

Is there a source to find out to what family name a person changed to? ex: If a
person was an ABRAMOWITZ as a child and changed his name, can I find out to what
he changed his name?


rayvenna@...
 

In the U.S., local voter registration records may also include name changes and
naturalization information.
Mindie Kaplan

"RichardMW" <richard.werbin@gmail.com> wrote:
In the U.S. I have had the most success identifying name changes by locating the
person's Naturalization Papers. Sometimes the Petition for Naturalization might
say what the current name was changed from. If you are really lucky, the
naturalization papers will include a Certificate of Landing. That was >from the
port of landing and lists the name that was used on the ship manifest. It will
also give you the date and ship name. That should lead you to the ship manifest.


RichardMW <richard.werbin@...>
 

In the U.S. I have had the most success identifying name changes by locating the
person's Naturalization Papers. Sometimes the Petition for Naturalization might
say what the current name was changed from. If you are really lucky, the
naturalization papers will include a Certificate of Landing. That was >from the
port of landing and lists the name that was used on the ship manifest. It will
also give you the date and ship name. That should lead you to the ship manifest.

Remember too that around 1900 in the United States that most people thought that
consistent spelling of their surnames was optional.

Yonatan Ben-Ari wrote:

Is there a source to find out to what family name a person changed to? ex: If a
person was an ABRAMOWITZ as a child and changed his name, can I find out to what
he changed his name?


Stepak
 

This is in response to Hansmartin Unger's question. I know >from another
branch of my family, who immigrated at the beginning of the 20th century,
that one did not have to register name changes at that time. My family had a
name with a connotation which they didn't like (Klots/Klutz), and somehow
they all agreed to change the name to something with more illustrious
sounding heritage (Kalish). Most of them changed the name "when we got off
the boat", meaning they simply lived as Kalish, and there was no need to
officially change the name. Nowadays this wouldn't work.

Ellen Stepak, Ramat Gan, Israel estepak@zahav.net.il

MODERATOR REMINDER: Authorities agree that names were ** not ** changed
by immigration workers at Ellis Island. The names recorded on ships'
passenger lists were passed on to the U.S.A. immigration records.