Missing documents from Posen #germany


Jeremy Lichtman <jeremy@...>
 

I've been trying to trace what happened to the Jewish
birth/marriage/death aktas (documents) >from an area of (today) western
Poland for some time. The Kreis (district) of Turek, which is a little
to the east of Kalisz, has few documents of this nature remaining.

I recently discovered a WW2 era document, written in German, in the
Polish archives. It details the existing records for several towns in
the district (Dobra, Tuliszkow, Turek, Uniejow, Wladyslawow) as of 1943.

There are several letters >from 1942/1943 also attached. One acknowledges
receipt in the town of Posen of the registers. Two more >from 1943 (I
think >from the district court, but not sure where that was) ask why
three boxes containing the listed records had not been shipped yet, and
then in response various excuses. A scan of the entire thing can be
found here:
https://searcharchives.pl/53/801/0/14.38/280/str/1/1/15#tabSkany

My question is thus: assuming that those documents were ultimately
shipped somewhere, what would have happened to them? Were they
destroyed? Misplaced? Sitting in a back room of the Berlin archives? How
would I go about tracing them, assuming they're still extant (and given
that this document appears to list specific inventory numbers for the
boxes)?

Finding them would be a major genealogical breakthrough for potentially
thousands of families originating in that area.

Regards, Jeremy Lichtman, Toronto, Canada

Researching WARTSKI and COHEN >from Turek and eastern Posen


kemper@...
 

Hello Jeremy Lichtman,

My question is thus: assuming that those documents were ultimately
shipped somewhere, what would have happened to them? Were they
destroyed? Misplaced? Sitting in a back room of the Berlin archives? How
would I go about tracing them, assuming they're still extant
I found not expect that these documents are in Berlin. They would have
been found in the meantime - more than 70 years. The Polish Archives
have very good databases and inventories, so I would expect to find them
there if they would be still extant.

In the end of the war and the first years after the way, many public
records and church records >from the former German eastern provinces have
been lost. In some cases, fleeing Germans might have taken them with
them, in most cases it seems that the records have been left in the
eastern provinces and have been distroyed in 1945/46 (by chance or with
intention).

Best records Tobias Kemper kemper@...