Required proving of non-Jewish ancestry in Nazi Europe? #germany


Judy Vasos
 

Hi Diana,

When we visited non Jewish relatives in Germany several years ago they
showed us a document >from the Hitler era to show they did not have jewish
ancestry. They had to research and prove their Aryan ancestry back to
the 18th century. The document was approved by the state. I don't know
what other countries where this was required but I was shocked when
I saw it. So Yes, this was true.

Judy Vasos : judyvasos@...

Diana Helen Gomes da Costa Mohr dianadacosta@... wrote:
I have heard it stated that in some countries overrun by the Nazis,
local populations were required to prove their lack of Jewish ancestry
by producing their own family trees. Is this just a myth or is it true?
If true, which countries were affected?


Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Diana Helen Gomes da Costa Mohr dianadacosta@... wrote:
"> I have heard it stated that in some countries overrun by the Nazis,
local populations were required to prove their lack of Jewish ancestry
by producing their own family trees. Is this just a myth or is it true?
If true, which countries were affected?" =============================>

Hello,
there was "Kleiner Ariernachweis" and "Grosser Ariernachweis".

"Kleiner Ariernachweis" means: proof of "Aryan" parents and
grandparents. Since 1933, members of the administration, teachers,
lawyer, students etc. had to prove their "Aryan" parents and
grandparents. Since 1935, this proof was necessary for every marriage
(Nuernberg laws).

"Grosser Ariernachweis" was necessary of those who wanted to join the
NSDAP and for farmers (Erbhofgesetz): proof of "Aryan" ancestry back to
those alive in the year 1800.

Those who wanted to join the SS had to prove back to those alive in 1750.

I don't think that these laws were applied outside Germany (but of
course in Austria, Sudetenland, Alsace-Lorraine).

"Kleiner Ariernachweis" (parents and grandparents) was very common
because it was needed very often.

If a "Grosser Ariernachweis" (back to 1800 or 1750) was issued one can
ask for what reason ...

Best regards

Tobias Kemper, <kemper@...>