Geographic Dictionary of the Polish Kingdom and other Slavic Countries #galicia


Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Hi All Galitzyaners,

One of the great historical sources on ancestrrs shtetls in Galicia can be
found in "Geographic Dictionary of the Polish Kingdom and other Slavic
Countries" ("Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego i Innych Krajow
Slowianskich"), Editor Bronislaw Chlebowski, Warszawa (Warsaw), 1892.

This 100+ years-old grand volumetric source contains wealth of
information. I would like to quote translated already text >from this
source, concerning small village of Popiele, located few miles away
from my ancestors town Boryslaw in Eastern Galicia. This information
is >from Mr. Slawomir Popiel's, NY, family website.

Mr. Popiel has informed me that he copied pages >from the Geographic
Dictionary volume VIII, located in Warsaw University. First sentence
of the text has been added by the website author.

I am wondering if anyone in our group has ever consulted this Dictionary
in the past.



Popiele, Ruthenian Popeli, a village in Drohobycz county, presently in
Ukraine, 10 km South-West >from the County Court in Drohobycz, 6 km >from
the Post Office and Telephone in Boryslaw.

Uniatycze are to the North, Derezyce to the North-West, Hubicze and Bania
Kotowska to the East, Boryslaw to the South-East, Opaka to the South-West,
Jasienica Solna to the North-West.

The village lies in the Dniestr basin, on the banks of Ratoczyna river,
a tributary to Tysmienica and that in turn is a tributary to Dniestr.
Ratoczyna, which originates to the South of the village, also has its own
tributaries. Its run through Eastern part of the area in the Nort-Westerly
direction and accepts within the village boundaries brooks originating to
the South-West >from Kotowce and Czecz and coming >from the left bank.

The stream called Slony comes >from the right bank. The village buildings
are located in the middle of the area in the Kotowiec valley and encompass
following hamlets: Popiele Gorne, Popiele Dolne, Mosty, Romanowka. To
the South-West >from the village there is a forest named Ratoczyna with a
mountain called Kotowiec (2,400 ft). A forest called Popiels' Oak Woods
is to the North, on the left bank of the Czecza river and on the right
bank a forest called Muraskow. To the Nort-West >from the village there
is a hill named Kamionka (1350 ft).

The major property in the area is presently owned by Mikolaj Kryska and
consists (in acres): fields - 617, meadows and orchards - 279, pastures -
58, forest - 1580. The other part owned by smaller estate owners totals
(in acres): fields - 938, meadows and orchards - 338, pastures - 483,
forest - 38. There were 193 families living here in 1880, 1111 people
in the township and 20 families and 128 people living on the court grounds.

The inhabitants were: 38 Roman Catholics, 1150 of Ukrainian Catholic
church, 50 of Mosaic religion; 47 Poles, 1155 Ruthenians, 37 Germans.
The Roman Catholic parish in Drohobycz, the Greek church in the village,
Drohobycz deanery. Bania Kotowska is a part of the Greek parish.
The Ukrainian Catholic church was erected in 1690 as per documents
preseved in the oblate in the Przemysl Town archives. The initiative
was of Inocenty Winnicki a Przemysl bishop. The erection documents
gives a privilege of relief >from any duties except spiritual, to the
parson.

The village has two Ukrainian Catholic churches, a one-class school,
a distillery, a petroleum refining plant and a water driven sawmill
with two linear and two circular saws. The sawmill needs 82 cubic
yards of fir and spruce per year and manufactures 49 cubic yards of
deal, batten and timber.

Siarczynski (manuscript in Ossolineum library no. 1829) writes:
Polish king Vladislav Jagiello granted the lands here to the knight
Popiel and he in turn, as Niesiecki remembers, settled here peasants
and established a village which became a nest of Popiels. In the
first half of 19th century the village was inherited by the counts
Karnicki. In 1853 Teresa Hizdef died in Popiele, a woman 130 years
old. She remembered many things that happend in the past in the area,
like the last invasion of the enemies which resulted with burning the
church (The Home Friend, 1853).

Lu. Dz.

Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego I Innych Krajow Slowianskich
(Geographic Dictionary of the Polish Kingdom and other Slavic Countries)
Wydany pod redakcja Bronislawa Chlebowskiego, Warszawa, 1892. Tom VIII.-
Zeszyt 94 str. 50-51


Alexander Sharon,
Calgary, AB, Canada


Avrohom Krauss <avkrauss@...>
 

I am wondering if anyone in our group has ever consulted this Dictionary
in the past.

Does this source include information on Jewish settlements?

The town of Popiele seems not to be one, as the following quote indicates:

"The inhabitants were: 38 Roman Catholics, 1150 of Ukrainian Catholic
church, 50 of Mosaic religion; 47 Poles, 1155 Ruthenians, 37 Germans.
The Roman Catholic parish in Drohobycz, the Greek church in the village,
Drohobycz deanery. Bania Kotowska is a part of the Greek parish.
The Ukrainian Catholic church was erected in 1690 as per documents
preserved in the oblate in the Przemysl Town archives. The initiative
was of Inocenty Winnicki a Przemysl bishop. The erection documents
gives a privilege of relief >from any duties except spiritual, to the
parson."


Avrohom Krauss
Telz-Stone Israel


rgordon@...
 

Avrohom Krauss wrote in part:

The town of Popiele seems not to be one [having a reference to the Jewish
population], as the following quote indicates:
"The inhabitants were: 38 Roman Catholics, 1150 of Ukrainian Catholic
church, 50 of Mosaic religion . . ."

Isn't the "...50 of Mosaic religion..." a reference to the Jewish population?

Richard Gordon
rgordon@pipeline.com
Seattle WA


Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

It appears that Polish Slownik has generated great interest amongst our
Galitzyaners.

Ive received lovely private letter >from the Polish gentlemen, John
Krasnicki, which I'm copying below since this letter provides information
about location of "Slownik" and very important note of caution.

I would like to follow up with a small project. Perhaps some of our
Galitzyaners who has access to the Slownik in NYC Public research Library of
FHC, can copy text for the towns they are interested in, and we could follow
up with translations. I am volunteering my translation services, but since
work could easily exceed my free time, I would appreciate assistance of your
Polish friends, or perhaps some translation can be done by Gesher Galicia
members and I would edit work.

Any suggestions ideas?

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB, Canada
p.s..

For Galitzayaners that have asked for Messr.Jan and Slawomir Popiel
genealogical bilingual website (excellent graphics) please visit:

http://members.tripod.com/krolpopiel/


Mr. Krasnicki letter:

Hello Alexander!

Your email regarding Slownik Geograficzny Krolestwa Polskiego... was
forwarded to me. I am familiar with it. It is an excellent classical Polish
gazetteer.

One does not have to go to Warsaw to have access to it. The New York Public
Research Library on 42nd Street and 5th Avenue, New York, NY, has a hard
copy of it, and the Mormons (FHC) in New York City have the entire Slownik
on several rolls of microfilms. In both places this excellent work is
readily available for research. My guess is that other major FHCs may have
it as well, and if not, perhaps they can order these microfilms >from Salt
Lake City.

A word of caution. The entry translated by Mr. Popiel is NOT representative
of all entries. Most entries for SMALL villages are not as detailed as that
for Popiele. Most entries for SMALL villages give only the location of the
village by stating in which county and province that village was located,
what were the neighboring villages or towns, the number of the inhabitants,
the acreage (fields, pastures, and woods) and the statistical data as the
number of Poles, Rusins, and Jews living there. It will also state to which
parish that village belonged (Roman Catholic and Greco-Catholic) and how
many of its inhabitants were Catholics, Greco-Catholics, and Jews. Unless
the village (or a part of it) was owned by a noble family, the chances are
that the entry will not mention any family names. The Popiel family was a
noble family of the coat of arms Sas whose "nest" was Popiele. Therefore, it
is not surprising that their name is mentioned in the entry on Popiele.

- - John F. Krasnicki


Avrohom Krauss <avkrauss@...>
 

I'm sorry! Of course "Mosaic religion" refers to Jews, and so, there
evidently were Jews in Popiele. I guess that's what happens when you go
through email when you're half asleep.

Avrohom Krauss
Telz Stone Israel
<avkrauss@actcom.com>