Aliyah passports new source of Inter-war Polish info #galicia


Jrbaston
 

In the 1930s as the shadow of history was lengthening over the Jews
of Europe, several thousand Polish Jewsmanaged to emigrate to what
was then British Mandate Palestine.

The names of many of these Jews will now be available on an index
of the passports issued at this crucial time in Jewish history. The index
was created >from the passports- which are in the holdings of the Jewish
Historical Institute (JHI) in Warsaw. Eventually this index will be
searchable as part of the Jewish Records Indexing-Poland online
database.

This index has been created as the result of the JRI-Poland/Jewish
Genealogical Society, Inc. (New York) project to index genealogical
collections at the JHI, in association with the Ronald S. Lauder
Foundation Genealogy Project.

For some researchers this index may provide clues to heretofore unknown
family members who went to Palestine, as well as family names
subsequently changed in Palestine but not recorded in any other source.

Because Inter-war Poland included areas that are now part of Ukraine,
as well as Belarus and Lithuania, there are passports >from many towns
that were part of Galicia.

The 'Aliyah Passports' collection in the Archives of the Jewish Historical
Institute of Poland (Warsaw) consists of 3,754 Polish passports issued
primarily during the 1930s to Polish citizens going to what was then
British Mandate Palestine.

The vast majority were one-time-only passports for Jews emigrating to
Palestine ("making aliyah"). These were issued in Poland or by Polish
consulates abroad. A very small number are tourist or non-emigrant
passports (e.g. for an author on a speaking tour or a nun on a pilgrimage
to the Holy Land).

Emigrating Polish citizens, upon receiving identity documents in their
new homeland, were supposed to turn in their Polish passports to the
Polish Consulate at their destination. These invalidated passports were
thensent by the local Polish Consulate back to the Foreign Ministry in
Warsaw, where they were filed away in government archives. Some Polish
Jewish emigrants to Palestine may have kept their passports, despite the
regulations of the time, so if you do not find a particular name in this
index,
it does not mean that individual did not emigrate.

At some point, the Polish Government decided that these "Palestine
passports" are Jewish historical documents and the collection was
transferred to the JHI. Only recently were these passports finally sorted,
alphabetized and computer indexed.

These passports - issued between 1929 and 1939 -- not only bear
photos and signatures of the bearers (in most cases), but the various
official stamps and seals tracethe entire route taken by the emigrant
and (on occasion) onward travels to other countries, providing precise
dates for each leg of the journey.

Passports include date of birth, place of birth, last place of residence,
occupation and civil status (single, married, etc.). The name of the child
or the number of children appear in some instances. The photographs
sometime include a husband and wife, or a husbandand/or wife with the
children.

There are more than 2600 different surnames represented in the
Passports. For a list of all SURNAMES extracted >from the Polish
Passports file, go to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jhi/aliyah-passport_surn.htm>

There are 1250 towns listed as places of birth. The most frequently
mentioned are Warszawa (190), Lwow (89),Berlin (79), Lodz (55),
Wilno (53), Bialystok (52), Krakow (50), Tarnow (46), Przemysl (43),
Wieden (36),Grodno (33), Tarnopol (33), Stanislawow (31), Rowne (29),
Pinsk (27), Czestochowa (26), Rzeszow (23), Baranowicze (21),
Kolomyja (21), Radom (21), Zdunska Wola (20), Kalisz (19), Lublin (19),
Mlawa (19), Bedzin (18), Dubno (17), Jaroslaw (17), Zamosc (17),
Suwalki (16), Kobryn (15), Siedlce (15)

For a list of all towns and villages mentioned as places
of birth in the Polish Passports file, go to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jhi/aliyah-passport_town.htm>

Currently, only the surname list is online (see above).
When the passport index can be added to the JRI-Poland database,
because of100-year Polish privacy laws, the online index will only
contain the basic information for each individual. Researchers with
an interest in passports that may be for family members must identify
themselves as relatives when requesting copies of the passports >from
the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation Genealogy Project at the Jewish
Historical Institute.

More details about this exciting new indexing project, and how you
can obtain more information >from the passport index, can be found at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jhi/jri-jhi-aliyah-passport.htm>

Judy Baston, Coordinator
JRI-Poland Polish Passport Project

JRBaston@aol.com


NFatouros@...
 

As soon as I read Judy Baston's announcement of Mar.8/02 about Polish Aliyah
passports of the 1930's I went to both websites:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jhi/aliyah-passport_surn.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jhi/aliyah-passport_town.htm

I saw that the name RAPOPORT appeared on the first site, and that
Podwolochisk was one of the towns.


from what was then Palestine, Chaim RAPOPORT of Podwolochisk wrote to my
grandfather, Dr. Isidor BELKOWSKY in Cleveland during the 1930's. In the
first of the three letters I have >from Chaim, he explained that he was a
grandson of a brother of my grandfather's mother.

I have wondered why or how Chaim managed to go to Palestine during this
period. His brother Arieh had stayed in Europe eventually fighting the
Germans and did not get to Palestine until after the war. According to
Arieh's story about his family which was published in the Podwolochisk Yizkor
book, all other members of the RAPOPORT family who lived in Podwolochisk
lost their lives to the Germans because the family's head, Wolf who had sold
his property and farm in order to make aliyah, had changed his mind about
moving to Palestine because he had heard that there people were not
religously observant.

Now I am curious to learn whether the RAPAPORT I noticed at the first Aliyah
Passport website was Chaim!

As soon as I can, I will make a contribution to support this project.

Thank you, Judy Baston, for your announcement.


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa and Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Korostyshev; BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY,
Ostryna.


NFatouros@...
 

As soon as I read Judy Baston's announcement of Mar.8/02 about Polish Aliyah
passports of the 1930's I went to both websites:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jhi/aliyah-passport_surn.htm

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jhi/aliyah-passport_town.htm

I saw that the name RAPOPORT appeared on the first site, and that
Podwolochisk was one of the towns.


from what was then Palestine, Chaim RAPOPORT of Podwolochisk wrote to my
grandfather, Dr. Isidor BELKOWSKY in Cleveland during the 1930's. In the
first of the three letters I have >from Chaim, he explained that he was a
grandson of a brother of my grandfather's mother.

I have wondered why or how Chaim managed to go to Palestine during this
period. His brother Arieh had stayed in Europe eventually fighting the
Germans and did not get to Palestine until after the war. According to
Arieh's story about his family which was published in the Podwolochisk Yizkor
book, all other members of the RAPOPORT family who lived in Podwolochisk
lost their lives to the Germans because the family's head, Wolf who had sold
his property and farm in order to make aliyah, had changed his mind about
moving to Palestine because he had heard that there people were not
religously observant.

Now I am curious to learn whether the RAPAPORT I noticed at the first Aliyah
Passport website was Chaim!

As soon as I can, I will make a contribution to support this project.

Thank you, Judy Baston, for your announcment.


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa and Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Korostyshev; BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY,
Ostryna.