Hebrew translation #galicia


Esther Yeck <esyeck@...>
 

I have posted an excerpt >from Meorei Galicia (Encyclopedia of Galician
Sages, Rabbi Meir Wunder, Israel). Please provide English translation.
Especially hoping there is a town mentioned in the text. It is on ViewMate
at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=22271

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Esther Yeck


Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 18 Mar 2005 08:29:28 UTC, judywolk@mindspring.com (Judy Wolkovitch)
opined:

Can someone please tell me what the phrase "Chederim M'toknim" means? (Mem
tav vov koof nun yod mem). It is in connection with the running of a school
in Poland and the translation I was given was "fixed rooms" but that doesn't
make sense.

Many thanks,

Judy Wolkovitch
Los Angeles
It does, actually. The literal meaning of Hebrew "H.eder" is indeed "room",
but it is the conventional term, especially in Eastern Europe, for a Jewish
school for young kids, parallel to elementary school. A better translation
for "Mtukan" in this context might be "Repaired", which is quite close to
its literal meaning. Putting these together, I understand the phrase to
indicate a Better kind of H.eder than the traditional, in which teaching
methods could sometimes be considered primitive, and the subject matter
excessively narrow.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Klausner
 

Heder was (and still is, in some places) the first school the Jewish boy
went to, and the program of study was the sidur (prayerbook) and the Humash
(the Five Books of Moses = the Torah). Literally Heder means "room".
In Eastern Europe, as modernization began to set in (at the end of th 19th
and the beginning of the 20th centuries), the Jewish communities
"modernized" the Hadarim (pl. of Heder) by expanding the scope of study and
introduced such subjects as arithmetic, reading and writing the common
language, sometimes even a foreign language, for example German.
This Heder was called Heder Metukan, meaning An Improved Heder. The ultra
orthodox did not accept this change at the time, obviously.

Note: Heder Metukan does mean, literally, a fixed (in the sense of
"repaired") room, as Judy was told. But the historical context cannot be
neglected if we aim to understand and reconstruct the life of our ancestors.

Best wishes, Yocheved

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot
yklaus@netvision.net.il

Join the Israel Genealogical Society (IGS) and receive Sharsheret Hadorot,
our bilingual (Hebrew & English) quarterly journal.
Society branches are in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa, Negev (Beer Sheva),
Netanya
Visit the IGS Website: www.isragen.org.il

Can someone please tell me what the phrase "Chederim M'toknim" means? (Mem
tav vov koof nun yod mem). It is in connection with the running of a school
in Poland and the translation I was given was "fixed rooms" but that doesn't
make sense.

Many thanks,

Judy Wolkovitch
Los Angeles
---
Sender: Judy Wolkovitch <judywolk@mindspring.com>


Ida & Joseph Schwarcz
 

The best translation would be "Modern Hebrew Schools."
Ida

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz
Dr. Ida Selavan Schwarcz

-----Original Message-----
From: Judy Wolkovitch [mailto:judywolk@mindspring.com]
Sent: Friday, March 18, 2005 2:56 AM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Hebrew translation

Can someone please tell me what the phrase "Chederim M'toknim" means? (Mem
tav vov koof nun yod mem). It is in connection with the running of a school
in Poland and the translation I was given was "fixed rooms" but that doesn't
make sense.

Many thanks,

Judy Wolkovitch
Los Angeles


HMW(rr) <mwienstein@...>
 

I want to thank everyone for their quick help on this.

Thanks,

Murray Weinstein
mwienstein@sw.rr.com


"HMW , rr" <mwienstein@sw.rr.com> wrote in message
news:Q3bD9.13406$Gc.387444@twister.austin.rr.com...

I have a page >from Tel Aviv directory of listings for Szmidts (Schmidt).
I would appreciate if anyone could translate it for me.

http://home.att.net/~hymurstein/other/szmidt-1b.jpg


Rob G <robbo@...>
 

I'd just like to thank the group for the response i got to my earlier
request. I've emailed the various kind people who offered to help
and have posted the document on the website
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/
I hope it will be of interest to anyone who happens upon it.
Best wishes.
Rob Goldsmith


david fielker <david@...>
 

It's amazing to be able to send a query to JewishGen just before going to
bed, then get up the next morning and find a dozen replies! Many thanks to
everyone.

The consensus seems to be that ba'al [beth-ayin-lamed] means 'master' or
'husband', and the heh at the end is a suffix that can mean 'her husband' or
'husband of', according to whether there was a dot in the heh. Now that I
know that I have returned to my dictionary and found it. I am used to
ignoring prefixes if I cannot find a word the first time, but I forgot about
this particular suffix!

Of course, in the printed Hebrew of the yizkor book there are no dots
indicating vowels etc. In a necrology this means that some of the surnames
need some inspirational guesses. In the past I've occasionally sought help
from my Israeli friends, and even they are lost on some of them. Where I am
in extreme doubt I am spelling it out in Hebrew.

My list of names >from the Vizotsk yizkor book is almost complete and I shall
be submitting it to the JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database.

David Fielker
London UK


Ruben Frankenstein
 

David Fielker asked the meaning of the word "Bet - Ayin - Lamed - He".
It is obviously "ba'ala(h)" = her husband.
Ruben Frankenstein
frankens@uni-freiburg.de


Stan Goodman <stan@...>
 

On Thu, 8 Feb 2001 00:32:40, david@lecture.demon.co.uk (david fielker)
opined:

I am transliterating the necrology >from the yizkor book for Visotsk,
Ukraine. Occasionally I find the word spelled beth-ayin-lamed-heh, which
according to my dictionary is baalah, meaning 'mistress, proprietess'.
Trouble is one of them is called Moshe!

Could it mean 'servant'?
No.

Can anyone illuminate?
You imply that the word is a surname, and I am guessing that the names
are Yiddish, rather than Hebrew (in which case one would not expect
"Ba'alah" to appear anyway). Yiddish uses as *modified* Hebrew
alphabet, in which 'AYIN represents E as in "effort". That doesn't
help much, I am sure, but it should steer you away >from trying to
interpret the text as Hebrew when it probably is not.
--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

PLEASE NOTE: To send me email, please delete the REMOVE_THIS >from my
address.


ROBERT WEISS
 

In a message dated 2/8/01 2:19:23 PM, david fielker writes:

<< I am transliterating the necrology >from the yizkor book for Visotsk,
Ukraine. Occasionally I find the word spelled beth-ayin-lamed-heh, which
according to my dictionary is baalah, meaning 'mistress, proprietess'.
Trouble is one of them is called Moshe!>>

Could it be an abbreviation of "BAL-Habayis" (balabos in Yiddish)? means head
of the household or landlord.

If the "heh" has a dot in it the word could mean "her husband".

Bob Weiss in Northridge, CA
RWeissJGS@aol.com


Judith Romney Wegner
 


I am transliterating the necrology >from the yizkor book for Visotsk,
Ukraine. Occasionally I find the word spelled beth-ayin-lamed-heh, which
according to my dictionary is baalah, meaning 'mistress, proprietess'.
Trouble is one of them is called Moshe!
David Fielker

No problem: The word "ba'al-ah" when spelled with a mappiq (dot) in the
heh (which of course you wouldn't actually see in an unvocalized text)
simply means "her husband." If for some reason the wife was mentioned
first, then the next entry, Mosheh ba'alah, would mean "Moses, her
husband."

Judith Romney Wegner


Victor Feintuch <victor@...>
 

Anytime,
Victor Feintuch
victor@askari.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Ragfhg@gateway.net [mailto:Ragfhg@gateway.net]
Sent: Sunday, May 28, 2000 10:44 AM
To: Hungarian SIG
Subject: Hebrew translation


Would somebody who can read Hebrew be willing to translate the inscriptions
on the graves of my two great-grandparents? I can e-mail them, if you're
willing to accept attached files, or mail them to you. I would greatly
appreciate this! Thanks, Faith Gardner

This SIG (h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org

Visit our website at http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/
---
You are currently subscribed to h-sig as: victor@askari.com
To unsubscribe send email to $subst('Email.Unsub')


leibner <leibner @...>
 

Hanna K. Grossman wrote:

After following a lot of different suggestions as to how to receive an
Israeli death certificate I received a fax in Hebrew in which the only
English says "general chevra kadisha-jerusalem"

It is one short page, with most writing in several columns. If someone
would be willing to try to translate-please respond directly to me and I
will snail mail you a xerox copy thereof.

Hanna K. Grossman, Cornwall , CT

mailto:hannakg@snet.net
---
Hello Hanna, please mail me the material and I will translate it for
you.Shana Tova. Shalom Bill Leibner >from Jerusalem