How common was it to travel between megyes in the 1820/'70's? #hungary


andrew-s@...
 

I have found that Jewish people travelled all the time. Once railways were
established, travelling >from one end of Hungary to the other was
commonplace, but even before, a merchant with a horse-and-buggy covered
several megyes (really megye'k) during a week's trip; before he had
children, he often took his wife along. Indeed, quite a few children were
born at places away >from home on such trips. In my upcoming book on the
history of one Hungarian Jewish family (tentative title: "Conversations with
my Ancestors"), the places where they were born, married and died include
parts of what was then Hungary >from Nyitra and Bars in the north-west to
Besztercebanya and Gomor in the north-east to Bekes and Csongrad in the
south-east.

Andrew Sanders
Toronto / Haifa

-----Original Message-----
From: Lois Levick [mailto:loisl637@comcast.net]
Sent: Monday, May 10, 2010 1:51 PM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] How common was it to travel between megyes in the
1820/'70's?

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Hi Genners -

Has anyone read about how common it was back in the 1820's to '70's to
travel between megyes, say, 40 - 60 miles? I'm finding lots of
possibilities in my research but the people I find are >from different megyes

than, say, where their children were born.

I can understand someone travelling to Budapest to try to do well in the big

city, and I understand if a marriage is arranged between two people >from
different areas; however, I don't know if it was that common. I am not
finding people born or married in the same place where they had children,
which makes me wonder if the people I'm finding are not who I was looking
for but have the same name.

So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Thanks for any info.

Lois Levick
Bensalem, PA
LEFKOWITZ, Nyirbogat, Hungary; MANDEL, Tarcal, Hungary; MULIARSKY,
Bialobrzegi, Poland; ROSENFELD, Hungary; STOGOFF, Kirovohrad, Ukraine


tom.vene@...
 

Hello Louis:
I can only speak about what happened in my family. In my family the answer
to your question would be a sound YES. My ancestors not only moved to and
fro different counties, but they also changed residences to distant towns
and villages 150-200 miles apart >from their original abode. This is how I
have in my family two major branches, one that settled to where today is
Slovakia and another that moved to today's Hungary.
Good luck with your search

Tom Venetianer
Sao Paulo-Brazil
email: tom.vene@bol.com.br

-----Original Message-----

Has anyone read about how common it was back in the 1820's to '70's to
travel between megyes, say, 40 - 60 miles? I'm finding lots of
possibilities in my research but the people I find are >from different megyes

than, say, where their children were born.

So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Lois Levick


Judy Petersen
 

In a message dated 5/10/2010 11:56:20 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
loisl637@comcast.net writes:
So, that's my question: was it commonplace for them do a lot of moving
around?

Thanks for any info.

Lois Levick

Hi Lois,
The short answer is yes. Here are two examples >from my own family:

1) My LICHT family is >from Kormend, Hungary. While on one hand, various
branches of my family were in Kormend >from the late 1700s until the
Holocaust, in my immediate family, of 6 siblings, two went to America, one went to
Papa, Hungary, one went to Szabadka (Subotica, Serbia) one went to Vienna
and one stayed in K├Ârmend.

2) It also depends on their occupation. For example, my STOSZEL family
were cantors. It was a very mobile profession. For my great great
grandfather, I have yet to find two of his children born in the same town, and those
children settled in at least three different towns. For my great
grandfather, it's complicated by the fact that he was married and divorced, so I'm
researching both my direct line and the half siblings. So far I have
found this family all over the Austria-Hungarian empire: in Hungary they lived
in Csecse, Eger, Hodmezovasarhely, Vacz, Ujpest and Pest. In Slovakia I've
found them in several towns in Nyitra megye. My great-grandfather also
spent some time in Uzhorod, which is now in Ukraine. And a granddaughter
ended up in Berlin.

Whenever I come across people who have the same name I add them to my
files with a question mark until I can prove a relationship one way or the
other. Most times I've been able to find a connection. Of course, it
depends on how common a surname you're researching. LICHT and STOSZEL are not
super common names. For me, there's a fair chance that a person with that
surname is related. I also have the WEISS surname in my family. In that
case, most people with that surname, or even the exact name (like Jacob
WEISS) are not related.
Regards,

Judy Petersen
Fort Collins, CO