Hungarian Surnames #hungary


Alex Magocsi
 

Melchior Lengyel was a Hungarian writer who was born Lebovics Menyhe'rt.

My first question pertains to his surnames. Is Menyhe'rt the Hungarian
equivalent of Melchior?
In pursuing my own family history, I have seen both names used for, I
believe, the same person, in documents >from the late 18th century in
Gyula-Jovancza.

The second question:
Is the female surname Erzset equivalent to Erzsebet and Elisabeth?
Here again, I believe I am seeing this surname used for the same person.

Thank you for any feedback that can be provided.

Alex Magocsi
York, York, Maine, USA

Researching MAGOCSI in Gyula-Jovancza, Tolna megye, Hungary


tom
 

his surnames were lebovics and lengyel. clearly, lengyel (which
means polish) was a nice hungarian name and not so obviously
"jewish". such name changes were common in the second half of the
19th century.

menyhert is a slightly unusual name. it is a hungarian variant of
the german meinhard, which stems >from "strong" or "brave", and was
used in the hungarian translation of the christian apocryphal legend
of the three kings, for the king that was called melchior in the
english version. melchior is purely hebrew, meaning "my king is
light", which some baby naming web sites list as the origins of
menyhert, which it isn't. the hungarian version of wikipedia also
mentions that the original form was probably menyha'rt.

i would guess that melchior sounded more dramatic than menyhert, and
therefore suited the playwright better.

i have never heard of erzset as a name, but erzsebet was such a
common name that it could either be a familiar form, or more likely
just an abbreviation. other nicknames for erzsebet include erzsi,
bo:ske, bo:zsi, betti, and probably many more.


....... tom klein, toronto

awmjr@... wrote:

Melchior Lengyel was a Hungarian writer who was born Lebovics Menyhe'rt.

My first question pertains to his surnames. Is Menyhe'rt the Hungarian
equivalent of Melchior?
In pursuing my own family history, I have seen both names used for, I
believe, the same person, in documents >from the late 18th century in
Gyula-Jovancza.

The second question:
Is the female surname Erzset equivalent to Erzsebet and Elisabeth?
Here again, I believe I am seeing this surname used for the same person.