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Yiddish words #general


warshall@...
 

I am trying to translate parts of a Yizkor book and need
help with a few Yiddish words:

1. a broken-down wagon is described as "tsushedikt"

2. a collapsed horse is described as "gepeygert"

3. several groups of Jews are mentioned: shopkeepers,
butchers and "konyukhes"

4. a large public space is called a "rebeleh"

5. an impromptu flag is tied to an "eteseh"

6. a clumsy foolish fellow is called (among other names) a "latutnik"

7. Weinreich's dictionary says that "kitka" means a bit of putty, but
that doesn't fit in my context: a dancing Hasid is clapping two of
them together. Is there another meaning for the word?

Thanks in advance. I can make shrewd guesses about most of these, but
I hope somebody in this talented group really knows.


Stephen Warshall <warshall@post.harvard.edu>
Gloucester, MA


MBernet@...
 

In a message warshall@tiac.net seeks translations
for various Yiddish terms in a Memorial book.

I'll try a few:

1. a broken-down wagon is described as "tsushedikt"
==parallel with German verscha"digt = demaged, >from Schade, damage.
Alternative yiddish forms include Oysvershedik, perhaps a more emphatic word.

2. a collapsed horse is described as "gepeygert"
==dead. >from Hebrew "Peger" a body/corpse not killed by ritual slaughter.

Some of the other words are probably of local Slavic provenance, or may be
regional words.

Michael Bernet


Shalom Mandelbaum <shalom@...>
 

Stephen Warshall wrote:

I am trying to translate parts of a Yizkor book and need
help with a few Yiddish words:

1. a broken-down wagon is described as "tsushedikt"
reasonable; German zerschaedigt, beshaedigt = damaged
2. a collapsed horse is described as "gepeygert"
PEGER (pei - gimel - reish) = carcas > gepeygert = died
3. several groups of Jews are mentioned: shopkeepers,
butchers and "konyukhes"
dont know, would help to see context and spelling
4. a large public space is called a "rebeleh"
dont know, would help to see context and spellingcould be derived from
Reshuth Harabim = Public Place.
The way you have it written it sounds like the deminutive of Rabbi.

Shalom Mandelbaum


WHirsch869 <whirsch869@...>
 

Stephen Warshall wrote:

3. several groups of Jews are mentioned: shopkeepers,
butchers and "konyukhes"
According to my Yiddish-English dictionary (Harkavy), these would be grooms or
stablemen.

Werner S. Hirsch, Curator, Jewish Historical Soc. of Gr. New Haven (CT)
http://pages.cthome.net/hirsch/


Jay A. Palmer <jpalmer2@...>
 

Konyukh is the Russian word for stableman/groom, supporting the reader who
suggested this as a Yiddish word, as well.

Funny note -- first thing I thought it sounded like was the Yiddish "ken
yikhus" -- people of no pedigree, or "no-accounts".

warshall@tiac.net wrote:

I am trying to translate parts of a Yizkor book and need
help with a few Yiddish words:

1. a broken-down wagon is described as "tsushedikt"

2. a collapsed horse is described as "gepeygert"

3. several groups of Jews are mentioned: shopkeepers,
butchers and "konyukhes"

4. a large public space is called a "rebeleh"

5. an impromptu flag is tied to an "eteseh"

6. a clumsy foolish fellow is called (among other names) a "latutnik"

7. Weinreich's dictionary says that "kitka" means a bit of putty, but
that doesn't fit in my context: a dancing Hasid is clapping two of
them together. Is there another meaning for the word?

Thanks in advance. I can make shrewd guesses about most of these, but
I hope somebody in this talented group really knows.


Stephen Warshall <warshall@post.harvard.edu>
Gloucester, MA


WHirsch869 <whirsch869@...>
 

Stephen Warshall wrote:

3. several groups of Jews are mentioned: shopkeepers,
butchers and "konyukhes"
According to my Yiddish-English dictionary (Harkavy), these would be grooms or
stablemen.

Werner
--
Werner S. Hirsch, Curator, Jewish Historical Soc. of Gr. New Haven (CT)
http://pages.cthome.net/hirsch/
Reply to: <whirsch869@aol.com> or <whirsch@snet.net>