Topics

Boston, Mass. Census #general


Gillian Zebaida
 

I have an address on an envelope dated 13 December 1926 of 133 Chambers
Street. I am trying to find a Kurland/Kurlan/Karlan/Karland family. Is
there anyone out there who might have access to the 1925 census for Boston,
who could take a look for me. I'm a long way >from the nearest LDS Centre.


Gillian Zebaida.
Researching: AMERIKANER (Ickelheim), BLUMENTHAL / ROBBINS (San Francisco),
DOLLAR/Dolliar / DUBE / ZASLAVER (Mogilev Podolskiy), EISMANN/EISEMANN
(?Grosskrotzenberg), HERZBERGER / NORDHAUSER (Wustensachen),OPPENHEIMER
(Worms), HIRSCHMANN / SCHMIDT (Grosskrotzenberg) REUS (Reis/Reiss),
SHOVERS (Racine, Wi) WERTHEIMER (Mannehim), ZEBAIDA (Iraq/USA)


Alan Rosenfield <arosen@...>
 

When I was a boy in the Boston area (around 1940) a policeman came around
every year to take
a Census. If memory serves correctly, it was intended to find out whether
registered voters listed at the address were actually living there. So I
think that the list was turned over to the City Clerk, who maintians the
voter lists. When I came of age, I noticed that the name and address
of each voter was posted at the entrance to the polling place. Crooked
politicians would hire people to go >from precinct to precinct, check the
list, and cast votes for dead people and those out of town. When my father
returned in 1921 >from working in Warsaw for three years, he found that he had
never missed an election. Since I left Boston over thirty years ago, I
don't know what the procedure is now.

As far as using your information is concerned, I reccommend writing to the
City Clerk in Boston for a copy of the voter registration card for the
person that you are interested in. The ones I received >from Chelsea (same
County) contain address, birthplace, naturalization date and place. These
were >from the early 1900's. I don't remember what the cost was, somethinbg
like five dollars.

Many states, including Ohio, purge voter lists frequently. This is a great
loss to genealogy since voter registration cards contain a lot of valuable
information.

Al Rosenfield
1650 Ridgway Pl., Columbus OH 43212 USA
e-mail <arosen@...>


Mary Katzman <maryfloy@...>
 

When I came of age, I noticed that the name and address
of each voter was posted at the entrance to the polling place. Crooked
politicians would hire people to go >from precinct to precinct...
Al Rosenfield
Voters lists are still posted at the entrance, no identification is
required to prove you are who you say you are, nor do you have to sign
anything that says you have voted. A volunteer sits at a table and just
checks off that you've voted. I've questioned this policy several times
and asked how they know who I say I am. The response is "we trust you". I
also find it an invasion of privacy to have the list of voters public in
that way. Not that I care if people know I'm a registered voter, but
because it lets everyone know whether or not their neighbors are. That's
nobody's business.

Personally, I now use the absentee ballot to vote.

Mary Floy Katzman
Framingham, Massachusetts


Alan Rosenfield <arosen@...>
 

When I was a boy in the Boston area (around 1940) a policeman came around
every year to take
a Census. If memory serves correctly, it was intended to find out whether
registered voters listed at the address were actually living there. So I
think that the list was turned over to the City Clerk, who maintains the
voter lists. When I came of age, I noticed that the name and address
of each voter was posted at the entrance to the polling place. Crooked
politicians would hire people to go >from precinct to precinct, check the
list, and cast votes for dead people and those out of town. When my father
returned in 1921 >from working in Warsaw for three years, he found that he had
never missed an election. Since I left Boston over thirty years ago, I
don't know what the procedure is now.

As far as using your information is concerned, I recommend writing to the
City Clerk in Boston for a copy of the voter registration card for the
person that you are interested in. The ones I received >from Chelsea (same
County) contain address, birthplace, naturalization date and place. These
were >from the early 1900's. I don't remember what the cost was, somethinbg
like five dollars.

Many states, including Ohio, purge voter lists frequently. This is a great
loss to genealogy since voter registration cards contain a lot of valuable
information.

Al Rosenfield
Columbus OH