What does given name "Lerle" translate to? #general


Mason Lilly <mlilly@...>
 

We need to be careful about how we use the word "translate." Most Yiddish
and Hebrew names were not translated to "American" names by our ancestors.
They were simply Anglicized -- or better, Americanized. The popular
"Moishe" or "Maishe" rarely get truely translated into Moses, but more
frequently ended up as Morris or Maurice or any of a number of names,
usually beginning with the letter "M." I'm not familiar with the name
Lerle, but I suspect it was an "old world" given name, and there's a good
chance that it ended up as Louis, especially if the rest of the family
seems to match up in the immigration records.

On 11 Nov 1998 04:01:40 -0800, rondoctor@csi.com (Ronald D. Doctor) wrote:

|I have run across an entry in one of Glazier's books for a man named Lerle
|DUBINSKI. Almost all the details in the entry for Lerle and his family
|match those of my great-grandfather and his family. However, my ggf was
|known as Louis. Does "Lerle" translate to "Louis"? If not, what would it
|translate to?


Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

I have run across an entry in one of Glazier's books for a man named Lerle
DUBINSKI. Almost all the details in the entry for Lerle and his family
match those of my great-grandfather and his family. However, my ggf was
known as Louis. Does "Lerle" translate to "Louis"? If not, what would it
translate to?

Ron Doctor
rondoctor@cis.com


MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-11-11 06:57:59 EST, rondoctor@csi.com writes:

<< Does "Lerle" translate to "Louis"? If not, what would it translate to?>>

==In Schwyzerduetsch Loerle or Lerle means "rude person." (Chaibish Loerle)

I doubt this would be the origin.

Until someone comes up with more knowledge: Lerle could be a nickname for
a teacher (Lehrer) and thus could be given to someone with the Hebrew name
Melamed (teacher). More likely, it's a nickname for someone whose name
ended in . . . . ler, or . . . . lerle. I can't think of any such name
offhand, but it could be >from a corruption of Lezer (Eliezer) or similar
corruption.


Michael Bernet, New York
*****************************
seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET, BERNERTH etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF: Frankfurt (Aron Wolf m. Babette Goldschmidt ca 1855) also in Wurzburg,
also Sali WOLF, Rotterdam


Dick Plotz
 

What was the original source for this name "Lerle"? If it was a document
handwritten in German script, the transcriber might have confused uppercase
"B" and "L". Would "Berle" make sense for this name?

Dick Plotz
Providence RI
Dick@Plotz.com


ddworski@...
 

Ronald D. Doctor wrote:

I have run across an entry in one of Glazier's books for a man named
Lerle DUBINSKI. Almost all the details in the entry for Lerle and his
family match those of my great-grandfather and his family. However, my
ggf was known as Louis. Does "Lerle" translate to "Louis"? If not, what
would it translate to?

Ron Doctor
rondoctor@cis.com

mailto:rondoctor@CSI.COM
---
Visit the JewishGen website: http://www.jewishgen.org
I recommend that you look at the actual ship manifest on microfilm (if
you have not already done so) to verify that the name is, in fact,
"Lerle." I have found many transcription inaccuracies in Glazier's
indices which only become apparent in a side-by side comparison of the
handwritten original manifest and Glazier's typed version of the same
data.

Deborah Dworski
Arlington, Virginia U.S.A.