Horkio or Karpio? in Russian Empire #general


Shmuel and Shoshana Arnold <darnold@...>
 

Hi,

I just received the immigration/naturalization papers >from the NARA for my
great grandparents.

On my great-grandfather's Declaration of Intention, it says he was born in
Horkio, Russia in 1891. On his Petition for Naturalization, it says he was
born in Karpio, Russia in 1891.

I have tried looking in StetylSeeker, but it just confused me. Any ideas
about this, Horkio or Karpio?

On my great-grandmother's papers it says she was born in Charkof, Russia in
1892.

Does anyone know anything about these places?

Thanks.

Shoshana Arnold

Researching:
SILVERSTEIN
ARSHINOFF (ARSCHINOW)
SHAHARBANI
LEVY >from Iraq/Iran
ABD-AL NABI
COHEN >from Iraq/Iran


armata@...
 

In article <000a01be0db7$8b6b64c0$b6f175c0@...>,
darnold@... (Shmuel and Shoshana Arnold) writes:
On my great-grandfather's Declaration of Intention, it says he was born
in Horkio, Russia in 1891. On his Petition for Naturalization, it says he
was born in Karpio, Russia in 1891.
...
On my great-grandmother's papers it says she was born in Charkof, Russia
in 1892.

Hi! It's likely these are all the same town usually transliterated today
as Kharkiv in modern Ukraine (though http://www.mapquest.com spells
it as Charkov).

The first letter in the town's name is a Cyrillic "X", representing a
sound like the "ch" in Scottish "loch" or German "och". It's usually
transliterated into the Roman alphabet as "kh", but you'll also see
"ch" or "h".

In Russian, the town ending is spelled "ov", but pronounced "off". The
pronounciation would account for your ggm's Charkof.

In Ukrainian, the town ending is spelled "iv", but pronounced "eew." If
your ggf's Horkio could be read as Harkiv, it would be accounted for by
the Ukrainian spelling.

Hope this proves to be right!


Joe Armata
armata@...