Simcha name in English? #general


MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-02-25 19:03:24 EST, 75342.3217@compuserve.com writes:

<< On two different UK birth certificates, he is described as Samuel & Simon.
Could both these names be the English attempt at Simcha? >>

==Indeed, yes. All three start with the S[h]in-Mem combination. All three
names are of course Hebrew, but Simcha, not being a biblical name, is not
known to English speakers. I've noticed the same with ancestors, as early as
the 17th century. They'll have the name they use for ceremonial purposes,
then they'll often have two or more "vivil" names, often Biblical names, often
German (or English) translations of a popular Hebrew or Yiddish names. It
happend often when the Hebrew and "foreign" names are equally prestigious as a
name in the local language; I've come through this Shmuel/Shlomo or
Samuel/Salomon combination many times.

In fact I'm wondering whether there was a local custom of deliberately using a
variant of the Hebrew name rather than the Hebrew name itself, for civil
purposes.


Michael Bernet, New York

seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BERNAETH, BERNERT etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg
FRENSDORFF/FRENZDORF: Frensdorf, Hamburg & Hanover.
BAMBERGER: the Wurzburger Rov and his family
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth; JONDORF, Bavaria
WOLF, Aron married Babette GOLDSCHMIDT ca 1860 in Frankfurt;
WOLF, Sali, b. Fkfrt, d. Rotterrdam 1941/2; WOLF, GOLDSCHMIDT, Wurzburg


mpfreed@...
 

Seymour Saltzman wrote:
My grandfather's name was Simcha. There are six of us named after him; 3
grandsons, Simon, Seymour, Stanley, and 3 great grandsons, Saul, Simcha and
Simcha. I would suggest that there is no one English name for Simcha, which
is
is used, incidentally, as such in Yiddish and Hebrew.

Absolutely right. I know a Simcha who is called Cecil. Incidentally I
think Simcha can be used as a name for a female too.

Murray Freedman
Leeds, England


Ben Noach <bnnch@...>
 

In my case:-

My father's name was Simcha, but officially he was called Salomon Mozes
(Dutch).Salomon may therefore be a proper equivalent for "Simcha".

He was born on the evening of Tisha be-Av(a day of mourning), and Simcha
meaning Joy, this was the reason for giving this name.So far the tradition.
But my research showed that the gravestone of his grandfather Salomon
Noach also gave "Simcha" as the Hebrew equivalent, so again I think that
Salomon can be seen as the proper equivalent of the Hebrew/Yiddish Simcha.

Shalom >from Israel,

BEN NOACH
mailto:bnnch@internet-zahav.net
http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/Union/6375


Seymour Saltzman wrote:

My grandfather's name was Simcha. There are six of us named after him; 3
grandsons, Simon, Seymour, Stanley, and 3 great grandsons, Saul, Simcha and
Simcha. I would suggest that there is no one English name for Simcha, which is
is used, incidentally, as such in Yiddish and Hebrew.