Hebrew/Yiddish/English #general


Miriam Israel <mhisrael@...>
 

Does any one know why my Jewish relatives wrote information on the back of
photos and on letters that seems to be in Hebrew as well as the English
language as well as in another language, which must be Yiddish.

Could someone please send me an email with Yiddish in it so I can work out
what particular language my Jewish ancestors are writing in. For instance,
there is a letter that has on the end of it, "drosh na bishlom kulam"
"bishlomrkh". I haven't even tried to date to even translate the letter,
let alone the last line.

Thanks in advance

Miriam Israel
Rockhampton
Queensland
Australia
Please visit my web site at http://www.powermad.net/monicasprott/

Searching for descendants of Morris and Jane ISRAEL, (formerly GOODMAN) and
Jacob and Julia GOODMAN, formerly Yakov GUTTMAN, >from England and what used
to be known as Prussia, Germany.


CMeys <cmeys@...>
 

In article <000501bfa001$515687a0$d8e025cb@default>, mhisrael@...
(Miriam Israel) writes:

Could someone please send me an email with Yiddish in it so I can work out
what particular language my Jewish ancestors are writing in. For instance,
there is a letter that has on the end of it, "drosh na bishlom kulam"
"bishlomrkh".
The one you are quoting is Hebrew. That line approximately translates to
"wishing you all well (well in this case is >from the root of sholom which means
peace, hello, goodbye, and is used in the phrase 'how are you')".

Cyndee Meystel
Chicago, IL


David Ziants <davidz@...>
 

Miriam Israel <mhisrael@...> asks:
Could someone please send me an email with Yiddish in it so I can work out
what particular language my Jewish ancestors are writing in. For instance,
there is a letter that has on the end of it, "drosh na bishlom kulam"
"bishlomrkh". I haven't even tried to date to even translate the letter,
let alone the last line.
Although Yiddish is a German based language written in Hebrew characters,
many Hebrew phrases are used as part of the language, and I assume much
depended on the region or community, on how much Hebrew was part of the
Yiddish (this is my intuition, although I don't know too much about
Yiddish).

The phrase "drosh na bishlom kulam" sounds Hebrew, and word to
word means: drosh=ask; na=please; bishlom=with the peace; kulam=everyone.
In English, the phrase would be rendered: "Please send regards to everyone".
In modern Hebrew we would say "na limsor drishat shalom l'kulam"; "limsor"
means "to pass on"; "drishat shalom" is the idiom for "regards"
(lit: "ask of the peace") .

The last word "bishlomekh", would lit be "in your peace", and is in the
feminine form (i.e. addressed to a female). If addressed to a male, it would
be "bishlomcha". Often we just say "b'shalom"="in peace".

Hoping this helps.

At this opportunity, I want to wish everyone a Chag Pesach kasher
v'same'ach, a very happy and kosher Passover.

--
David Ziants
davidz@...

Ma'aleh Adumim, Israel