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Rovna Poland or Russia #general


George Heister <heister@...>
 

My friend's father (Abraham Segal--originally Cygielnik) came to the
United States in 1913. His city of birth was Rovna Russia. His sister
arrived in America in 1922. Her naturalization records lists her place
of birth as Rowna, Poland. As there are a few different shtetls with
similar names, I was wondering if anyone can locate a shtetl named Rowna
that was part of Russia in 1913 and then became part of Poland by 1922.
Any help would be appreciated.

Bernice Berman Heister


Doug Cohen <DMCohen@...>
 

Rovno, in Vohlniya, Russia is now called Rivne, in Ukraine. It was
considered Poland in the first decades of the 1900s. Look in Shtetl seeker
under Rivne. There is (or was) a Rovno Society in NYC, according to a
third-cousin of mine whose father was born there (and was one of the few to
escape the mass murder by the nazis in 1941).

Doug Cohen, Lexington, MA
DMC@...

"George Heister" < heister@... > wrote in message
news:39EE6BCB.C9D5D027@......

My friend's father (Abraham Segal--originally Cygielnik) came to the
United States in 1913. His city of birth was Rovna Russia. His sister
arrived in America in 1922. Her naturalization records lists her place
of birth as Rowna, Poland. As there are a few different shtetls with
similar names, I was wondering if anyone can locate a shtetl named Rowna
that was part of Russia in 1913 and then became part of Poland by 1922.
Any help would be appreciated.

Bernice Berman Heister


Steven Schwartz <SSchwartz@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: George Heister <heister@...>
To: JewishGen Discussion Group <jewishgen@...>
Date: Thursday, October 19, 2000 2:50 AM
Subject: Rovna Poland or Russia


George, as I understand it, Rovna was part of Russia up to the time
of the Russian Revolution. After World War I, Rovna was administered
by Poland.

My grandparents, Zus (Samuel) NARODETSKY and Golda HENDELBERG NARODETSKY
lived in Rovna until 1921, when they came to America on a Polish passport.

Steve Schwartz,
Dover, Delaware USA
SSchwartz@...

Also searching:

HAUPTMAN, of Drohobych in Eastern Galicia, now Western Ukraine
KIMELHEIM, of Drohobych (Galicia / now Ukraine) and >from Budapest,Hungary
NARODETSKY, of Rovno in old Volhynia District, Ukraine (and >from Kiev).
HENDELBERG or HANDELBERG, of Annopol (near Rovno) in old Volhynia District,
Ukraine.FISCHER, of Budapest (or Grosbedan or Yanashee),Hungary. SCHWARTZ, of
Vienna, Austria; Nagy Totfalu and Mateszalka, Hungary.


Judith Romney Wegner
 

Rovno, in Vohlniya, Russia is now called Rivne, in Ukraine.
Doug Cohen

That's interesting, because someone else just mentioned that Lvov is now
Lviv.

A pattern seems to be emerging here, whereby place names with an "o" vowel
are getting their names changed so as to replace the "o" sound by an "i"
vowel sound. Could some linguist who knows Russian and Polish well please
explain to us the reason for this phenomenon. -- i.e. who is responsible
for changing these place names and why, specificlaly, are these "o"
vowels being changed to "i" vowels?

Judith Romney Wegner


Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Bernice,

Town Rovne in Russian Empire's Volhynia Gubernia became a part of the
independent Poland's Wojewodstwo (Province) Wolynskie >from 1918 till 1939,
when Soviets invaders took it over. Under Poland's administration town name
was known as Ro'wne (ruh vneh). Currently town is renamed as Rivne in
Ukrainian. In all three languages town name is translates as "straight".

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta

"George Heister" <heister@...> wrote in message
news:39EE6BCB.C9D5D027@......

My friend's father (Abraham Segal--originally Cygielnik) came to the
United States in 1913. His city of birth was Rovna Russia. His sister
arrived in America in 1922. Her naturalization records lists her place
of birth as Rowna, Poland. As there are a few different shtetls with
similar names, I was wondering if anyone can locate a shtetl named Rowna
that was part of Russia in 1913 and then became part of Poland by 1922.
Any help would be appreciated.

Bernice Berman Heister
mailto:heister@...


Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Hi Judith,

There is no one to blame in particular. Russian, Polish and Ukrainian (and
Belarussian, and Slovak) are quite separate Slavic languages with their own
historical socioeconomical and any other type of the development.

Zayn may gezund maydele

--
Alexander Sharon
mailto: a.sharon@...
"Judith Romney Wegner" <jrw@...> wrote in message
news:v03010d56b6174aab17d9@[128.148.44.86]...

Rovno, in Vohlniya, Russia is now called Rivne, in Ukraine.
Doug Cohen

That's interesting, because someone else just mentioned that Lvov is now
Lviv.

A pattern seems to be emerging here, whereby place names with an "o"
vowel are getting their names changed so as to replace the "o" sound
by an "i" vowel sound. Could some linguist who knows Russian and
Polish well please explain to us the reason for this phenomenon. --
i.e. who is responsible for changing these place names and why,
specificlaly, are these "o" vowels being changed to "i" vowels?


Marla Waltman Daschko <waltman@...>
 

In response to a question as to why place names are changing >from 'o'
endings to other endings such as 'i' Alexander Sharon wrote:

There is no one to blame in particular. Russian, Polish and Ukrainian
(and Belarussian, and Slovak) are quite separate Slavic languages with
their own historical socioeconomical and any other type of the
development.
He is correct. But the reason for this change is because of the
political changes that have been sweeping over the former USSR.
Countries that have been dominated for centuries by Russia are now
reclaiming their own languages and their own pronunciation of the place
names within their boundaries.

So, for example, Lvov (Russian) is now L'viv (Ukrainian), Kiev (Russian)
is now Kyiv (Ukrainian), and Rovno (Russian)is now Rivne (Ukrainian).
The same thing has happened in Poland and other eastern European
countries.

Therefore, just as we learned to call stop saying 'Peking' and pronounce
the city as 'Beijing' we will need to recognize the 'new' and proper
placenames in Ukraine, Poland, etc.

Marla Waltman Daschko
Nepean, Ontario, Canada
waltman@...