CA Death index vs. Social Security Death Index? #general


Lthorpe883@...
 

Fellow Genners-

Today I found a relative in the California Death Index. The information
included his Soc. Sec. number.
I then checked the on-line Social Security Death Index, and he did not
appear. In addition to entering his name only, I entered the Soc. Sec.
number alone.

There was no listing for that number.

What am I to infer >from this?

Of course I will send for his application and his death certificate, but
what could account for this discrepancy?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Linda Thorpe Caciola
Venice, CA


Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

arieders@... (Alice Rieders) wrote:

Lthorpe883@... wrote:

Today I found a relative in the California Death Index.
I then checked the on-line Social Security Death Index, and he did not
appear.
The CA Death Records Index covers the period 1940-1997.
The SSDI includes few deaths prior to 1965.
Did your relative die between 1940 and 1965?
Besides one's death, there is another thing that has to happen in
order to get one into the Social Security Death Index: Somebody has to
notify the Social Security Administration and to make a claim for
survivors benefits. No claim, no listing. That, anyway, is what it
says on the SSDI website. And if that is true, then it isn't actually
a death index, but a claims index. In other words, one can't expect to
find in the SSDI persons who did not leave beneficiaries behind, or
those e.g. so estranged >from their families that their death was not
known to the potential beneficiaries, or those whose beneficiaries
failed for any reason to file the required claim.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

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Herb <herbiem@...>
 

The SSDI is not a claims index related to survivor benefits. It is a
list of people who have received benefits and are deceased. If no one
notifies the Social Security Admin of a death, the checks may continue
to flow. Perhaps the confusion is that people in order to begin
receiving benefits upon reaching the eligible age or become entitled for
other reasons have to submit a claim to the Soc Sec. Admin. The term
beneficiary frequently refers to the person who was paying social
security taxes and is entitled to benefits .

Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado

Besides one's death, there is another thing that has to happen in
order to get one into the Social Security Death Index: Somebody has to
notify the Social Security Administration and to make a claim for
survivors benefits. No claim, no listing. That, anyway, is what it
says on the SSDI website. And if that is true, then it isn't actually
a death index, but a claims index. In other words, one can't expect to
find in the SSDI persons who did not leave beneficiaries behind, or


Alice Rieders <arieders@...>
 

Lthorpe883@... wrote:

Today I found a relative in the California Death Index.
I then checked the on-line Social Security Death Index, and he did not
appear.
The CA Death Records Index covers the period 1940-1997.
The SSDI includes few deaths prior to 1965.
Did your relative die between 1940 and 1965?


Stan Goodman <stan@...>
 

My recollection of the text on the SSDI site is that it says that there
has to be a claim. If my memory is wrong, or if the text is wrong, so be it.

MMBegun@aol. wrote:

Not quite so, Stan. My mother's name, as well as other deceased relatives,
very definitely appears in the Social Security Death Index and there was
no need for anyone to file a benefits claim. No surviving spouse, no
minor children.

My understanding of the Index is that it is a listing of people who had paid
into the Social Security fund and who collected benefits for a while before
they died, or were paid benefits on behalf of a deceased spouse (or in
the case of minor children as beneficiaries -- the parent's as insured).
I am open to clarification if my understanding is wrong. Anyone?

Stan Goodman writes:

<< Besides one's death, there is another thing that has to happen in
order to get one into the Social Security Death Index: Somebody has to
notify the Social Security Administration and to make a claim for
survivors benefits. No claim, no listing. That, anyway, is what it
says on the SSDI website. And if that is true, then it isn't actually
a death index, but a claims index. In other words, one can't expect to
find in the SSDI persons who did not leave beneficiaries behind, >>
Stan Goodman >>


MMBegun@...
 

In a message dated 11/13/00 1:25:29 AM Eastern Standard Time, Stan Goodman
writes:

<< Besides one's death, there is another thing that has to happen in
order to get one into the Social Security Death Index: Somebody has to
notify the Social Security Administration and to make a claim for
survivors benefits. No claim, no listing. That, anyway, is what it
says on the SSDI website. And if that is true, then it isn't actually
a death index, but a claims index. In other words, one can't expect to
find in the SSDI persons who did not leave beneficiaries behind, >>

Not quite so, Stan. My mother's name, as well as other deceased relatives,
very definitely appears in the Social Security Death Index and there was no
need for anyone to file a benefits claim. No surviving spouse, no minor
children.

My understanding of the Index is that it is a listing of people who had paid
into the Social Security fund and who collected benefits for a while before
they died, or were paid benefits on behalf of a deceased spouse (or in the
case of minor children as beneficiaries -- the parent's as insured). I am
open to clarification if my understanding is wrong. Anyone?

Mila Begun in New York
(MMBegun@...)