Russian/Ucrainian words? #general


Susanna Vendel <susanna.vendel@...>
 

I am making some translation >from a Romanian document >from 1852 which was
issued in Botosani district, Romania.
It seems that people was mixing at that time Romanian words with
Russian/Ucrainian words. I can understand Romanian but
there are some words which are definitively not Romanian.

For exemple:
1. Vidomostia Jidovilor.
"Jidovilor" = of the Jews
But what is "Vidomostia"

2. Mansh zet, ginerele lui Moscu Kutar in satul Manastireni.
Mansh ..., the brother-in-low of Moscu Kutar >from the village of Manastireni.
What is "zet"

Susanna Vendel, Stockholm


Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

For exemple:
1. Vidomostia Jidovilor.
"Jidovilor" = of the Jews
But what is "Vidomostia"
"Vidomost'" is "appearance" ("Vid" is cognate with Latin words like
video). You have quoted the word in its genitive form; the phrase
means literally "appearance of the Jews" -- probably "jewish
appearance" is meant.

2. Mansh zet, ginerele lui Moscu Kutar in satul Manastireni.
Mansh ..., the brother-in-low of Moscu Kutar >from the village of Manastireni.
What is "zet"
It doesn't remind me of anything at all. Maybe you are misreading the
first letter (an E, which looks like it was written backward) as Z,
and dropping a final syllable, so that it actually says "etot"; is
that possible, perhaps >from a badly handwritten original? That would
make it say "This Mansh, ginerele....".

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

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Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

On Tue, 5 Dec 2000 16:07:23, armata+@pitt.edu (Joe Armata) opined:

Quite right. My imagination failed me, and I didn't recognize the Ya
that may have been represented by the E. Whether Zyat' makes sense in
the Romanian context, maybe the questioner can tell.

It also means brother-in-law (zyat').

Joe Armata
armata@pitt.edu

2. Mansh zet, ginerele lui Moscu Kutar in satul Manastireni.
Mansh ...,the brother-in-low of Moscu Kutar >from the village of Manastireni.
What is "zet"
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

PLEASE NOTE: Messages to the "From:" or "Reply to:" address of this
posting will NOT reach me, but will be deleted automatically unread.
Replace "sheol" with "stan". Please send plain text only.


Joe Armata <armata+@...>
 

It also means brother-in-law (zyat').

Joe Armata
armata@pitt.edu

2. Mansh zet, ginerele lui Moscu Kutar in satul Manastireni.
Mansh ...,the brother-in-low of Moscu Kutar >from the village of Manastireni.
What is "zet"


Joe Armata <armata+@...>
 

My guess is "vidomostia" is a misreading of "vedomost'" with some case
ending, maybe the plural (vedomosti), as -ia is an incorrect ending for
nouns in "-ost'". Handwritten Cyrillic can be very hard to read, and the
first vowel might actually have been a letter called jat' in the old
orthography (today it's replaced by an e), which can look like an i if
it's written fast. Vedomost' means a register or a list, which seems to
fit the context. In the plural it can also mean a newspaper.

Hope this helps!

Joe Armata
armata@pitt.edu

For exemple:
1. Vidomostia Jidovilor.
"Jidovilor" = of the Jews
But what is "Vidomostia"