A Jewish boy in the Czar's Army #general


M6rose@...
 

My grandfather, Moshek Kamien (>from Ostrow Mazowiecka in Poland) was
drafted into the Polish/Russian Army in the late 1800s; and, being tall
and strongly-built, was put into the Cavalry--an unfortunate choice since
he was terrified of horses. Subsequently, a horse kicked him--hard--in
the leg, which became badly infected. Army doctors wanted to cut off the
bad leg but he protested vehemently and, upon being told he would die
otherwise, said well then, he would die. So he was sent home. The
local "healer" (does anyone know who that might have been? a midwife? a
rebbe? and does anyone know what this medicine man/woman was called?) had
him sit next to an anthill and placed the suppurated leg into the middle
of the anthill. The ants ate all the bad flesh and left behind uric acid--
I think it's uric acid--which promoted healing. After a whole day and a
night, or so he told me, he was taken out with a clean leg. He never even
had the slightest limp; and apparently he was in good enough shape so that
he might have to go back to his barracks. It was then that he went on the
lam, traveling by night through Germany, Holland (I think) and somehow, to
England, thence across the ocean to the US. Grandpa was born in 1876 and
left Europe probably in 1905. He sent for his wife (She was Sora Bluma
Dyber >from Lubotyn in Lomza Gubernya)and two children when my father was
four, which would have been 1907. Does anyone know where I might find a
list of ships leaving England for the US in that year? and their passenger
lists? My grandfather always told my brothers that they must *Never* go
to Poland because any male descendent of his could be forced into the
Polish Army to finish out his unfinished tour of duty (which was what?
25 years?). Does anyone know if that's true?

I'll appreciate any answers to my questions...any messages >from those who
think they might be related...and any other information about our mutual
Polish-Jewish past.

Marcia Kamien
Brooklyn, NY

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Judith Romney Wegner
 

The local "healer" [snip] had
him sit next to an anthill and placed the suppurated leg into the middle
of the anthill. The ants ate all the bad flesh and left behind uric acid--
I think it's uric acid--which promoted healing.
Marcia Kamien
Marcia, what a marvellous story about the ants disinfecting your
grandfather's leg!

However, the acid in question is not uric acid, it's formic acid.
"Formis" is latin for ant -- and there's also a famous fable of La
Fontaine about the grasshopper and the ant, called "La cigale et la
fourmi," which we had to learn by heart for French class in high school way
back when -- which is why I know it's formic acid! (Unfortunately nobody
makes schoolkids learn anything by heart nowadays, more's the pity; if
they did, everyone would have a great deal more useful general knowledge
than they do! )

Judith Romney Wegner


Martin Green <btestware@...>
 

...The local "healer" (does anyone know who that might have been? a
midwife? a rebbe? and does anyone know what this medicine man/woman
was called?)...
A "znakhor" was a practitioner of folk medicine in the old country.
I think this must be a Slavic term.

Martin Green


BetteJoy <bettejoy@...>
 

A Yiddish word for medical assistant was felsher.

Betty Provizer Starkman


Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

On Wed, 27 Dec 2000 03:09:07, btestware@... (Martin Green)
opined:

...The local "healer" (does anyone know who that might have been? a
midwife? a rebbe? and does anyone know what this medicine man/woman
was called?)...
A "znakhor" was a practitioner of folk medicine in the old country.
I think this must be a Slavic term.
I have never seen it in Russian, and it is not in either of my Russian
dictionaries; nor is it Czech. It is Polish, and means "witch doctor",
more or less.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

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http://www.hashkedim.com

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Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

On Thu, 28 Dec 2000 04:15:37, bettejoy@... (BetteJoy) opined:

A Yiddish word for medical assistant was felsher.
It is, like most of the Yiddish vocabulary, or German origin, but it
is in common use in Russian as well. Many feldshers, technicians
rather than physicians, came here during the initial large surge of
immigration >from the USSR about ten years ago, and had to
be retrained to fit into the Israeli economy.

For what it's worth "Czar's Army" is a bad translation of "Tzarskaya
Armiya"; "Tzarskaya" means "Imperial", and it's the Imperial Army,
just as "Tzarstvo" means "Empire". Nobody in the US speaks of the
President's Army; in the UK, it's the Royal Army, not "Queen's Army".

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com

PLEASE NOTE: Messages to the "From:" or "Reply to:" address of this
posting will NOT reach me, but will be deleted automatically unread.
Replace "sheol" with "stan". Please send plain text only.