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Yoshi #general


alan benjamin <wizard@...>
 

Can someone please tell me if Yoshi might be a dimunitive
for Yisroel? Thank you so much.
Alan Benjamin


I.Weiss/z
 

Yehoshuah

I believe it is

Be well

Meir

Can someone please tell me if Yoshi might be a dimunitive
for Yisroel? Thank you so much.
Alan Benjamin


Stan Goodman <stan@...>
 

On Sun, 11 Feb 2001 21:03:10, wizard@... (alan benjamin)
opined:

Can someone please tell me if Yoshi might be a dimunitive
for Yisroel? Thank you so much.
Alan Benjamin
It's much more likely to be a nickname for Yehoshua.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

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Sidney Slivko
 

Everyone who's posted on this question seems to feel it's Yehoshua.

More likely, however, is Yosef, as in Yoshe-Ber (Yosef-Dov)
Soloveitchik, z"l.

Sidney Slivko


Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

On Sun, 11 Feb 2001 21:03:10, wizard@... (alan benjamin) wrote:

"Can someone please tell me if Yoshi might be a dimunitive for Yisroel?"


The Yiddish given name Yoshe (which I assume is the name involved here)
forms a legal, Hebrew double name with the Hebrew name
Yehoshua: Yehoshua Yoshe. This is a legal Hebrew name in the sense
that a Jew with this double name must use it when being called to the
Tora for an aliya, and a Rabbi writing a Ketuva (marriage certificate),
get (divorce certificate), or other type of Jewish legal document, must
write this name in full, as above.

This does not mean that the person with such a name cannot use other
kinuim (nicknames) for Yehoshua, or indeed Yoshe itself, in his daily
affairs. Frequently, such names were used separately and are much more
likely to be found separately in official government archival
documents, rather than the original Hebrew name Yehoshua.

G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@...


Sherribob <sherribob@...>
 

good evening 'Genners,

I must agree with Prof. Esterson on the Yoshi topic. Many men in my family
(including my dad) were called Yoshi. The "formal" name being Yosef.
Yossel, or Yossela (sp?) are other diminutives used for Yosef in my family.

Even upon the birth of my dad my gf wrote his newborn son's name in his
pocket diary as Yoshi, not Yosef, and my dad always used the form Yoshi
whenever he was called upon to use his Hebrew name.

My family was >from Ariogala, Lithuania, BTW.

regards,

Sherri Bobish


Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Sidney Slivko posted as follows:

"Everyone who's posted on this question seems to feel it's Yehoshua.

More likely, however, is Yosef, as in Yoshe-Ber (Yosef-Dov)
Soloveitchik, z"l."

Mr. Slivko is correct -- Yoshe is indeed a nickname for
Yosef. However, it is simply a diminutive for Yosef, and does not form
a legal Hebrew double name, one required for being called to an aliya,
or to be used in a Jewish contract. The Yiddish name Yoshe _does_,
however, form such a legal Hebrew double name with Yehoshua. The
source for this are the Hilchot Gitin (Rabbi's guides for writing
Jewish contracts), such as Arukh HaShulkhan, or the Beit Shmuel. On
the other hand, the diminutive Yiddish name Yoshke _does_ form a legal
Hebrew double name with Yosef.

So, the upshot is that Yoshe is a diminutive of Yosef, but not one that
is required to be used in Jewish contracts. The use of the name Yoshe
Ber for HaRav Soloveitchik z"l, was an endearing means used by those
that loved and respected this great man to express their feelings toward him.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@...