Looking up something in the census #general


marie darrer <offsides@...>
 

How do I go about looking up an address in the US census? I want to
check on an address in both 1910 and 1920. I would also like to look up
2 surnames in those years. The address is in Brooklyn.
Thanks to everyone for the help of late, I am fortunate to have found
this group, and am incredibly lucky that there are so many knowledgeable
and helpful members!
Marie Darrer

Primarily searching: Darrer/Darer and Newman ( at least for now!)


Primpark <primpark@...>
 

Dear Marie,

Although I can't really help you with this inquiry, I noticed that you are
researching the surname NEWMAN, and wonder whether I might be able to help you
at all with this area of your research.

Regards,

Jonathan Newman,

Leeds, England

primpark@aol.com


LenLW <lenlw@...>
 

Just wondered - how does on access a census. For example, the one in the
Bronx, NY about 1925.

Any suggestions?

Leonard Nadler
Silver Spring, MD
Len


Dr.Katalin Got
 

I do have the same problem. Trying to find data about my Great
Uncle Bertalan(Berci) GESCHEIT who migrated >from Balassagyarmat to U.S.
between 1910-20.Possibly lived in Bronx. His niece Gizella SELYMES (KOHN)
did,she followed her uncle in 1920 and lived in Bronx XXXX Valentine Ave
for 30 years.
Any help would be aporeciated.
Regards
Katalin Got
Australia,Adelaide

At 02:38 PM 13-03-02 +0000, you wrote:
Just wondered - how does on access a census. For example, the one in the
Bronx, NY about 1925.

Any suggestions?

Leonard Nadler
Silver Spring, MD


Rick Spears <rspears@...>
 

Marie, You may be able to go to your main library in your town and look it
up. Start with the 1920 Census. Have the librarian help you find the soundex
spelling of the name which will look something like: K-122 etc. Then look in
the census book for the correct microfilm for that particular soundex. The
microfilm will be an alphabetical index of each soundex name. Find the
correct soundex on the film, there may be many on one film and search for
the last name you are looking for and then the first name. If you are lucky
to find the correct name, THEN you can go seach the actual census using the
information on the index to find the exact microfilm that has his census.

Its not as hard as it sounds...

Rick Spears

"marie darrer" <offsides@bellatlantic.net> wrote in message
news:3C8C2938.1D2697F6@bellatlantic.net...

How do I go about looking up an address in the US census? I want to
check on an address in both 1910 and 1920. I would also like to look up
2 surnames in those years. The address is in Brooklyn.
Thanks to everyone for the help of late, I am fortunate to have found
this group, and am incredibly lucky that there are so many knowledgeable
and helpful members!
Marie Darrer


Steve Gabai <sgabai@...>
 

From: "Rick Spears" <rspears@gate.net>
Marie, You may be able to go to your main library in your town and look it
up. Start with the 1920 Census. Have the librarian help you find the
soundex
spelling of the name which will look something like: K-122 etc. Then look
in
the census book for the correct microfilm for that particular soundex. The
microfilm will be an alphabetical index of each soundex name. Find the
correct soundex on the film, there may be many on one film and search for
the last name you are looking for and then the first name. If you are lucky
to find the correct name, THEN you can go seach the actual census using the
information on the index to find the exact microfilm that has his census.

Rick Spears

No, the soundex is not in alphabetical order. Once you find the microfilm
that has your soundex code, you have to scroll to the code - and then it
goes in alphabetical order by first name, not last.

But I'm not sure what Marie means about looking up an address in the census.
If you just want an address, you can find directory's >from whatever year
you want - on microfilm.

The 1920 census is indexed by soundex code, so you can find anyone's census
- for that year, and 1900 which is fully indexed as well - quite easily.

For most of the States, 1910 is not indexed and you'll have to know the
persons address to find the census. So you'll have to find a directory and
"look up" the person you're looking for.


But then you'll needed to find out what E.D that address is located in. For
Brooklyn, I would guess the NY public library would have those ED's and
maybe the the Fed. Archives on Varick St.

Steve Gabai

Researching:
ABOUAF, ABRAMS, ALGRANATI (ALGRANTI), CARMONA, CHASAN (CHASON -SCHAEZEN -
SCHAENEN), GABAI (GABBAI - GABAY), GREENBAUM, GREENBERG, INSKY, PERLSTEIN,
RATOVETSKY, ROUSSO (RUSSO), SCHRAPATZ (SCROPOTICH), SCHIMSKY, SHWARTZ
(SZWEC), SILVER & TARANTO


robert@robertcorwin.com <rcorwin@...>
 

For most of the States, 1910 is not indexed and you'll have to know the
persons address to find the census. So you'll have to find a directory and
"look up" the person you're looking for.

But then you'll needed to find out what E.D that address is located in. For
Brooklyn, I would guess the NY public library would have those ED's and
maybe the the Fed. Archives on Varick St.
The 1910 census records for New York City, at long last, have recently been
indexed. They are not on microfilm, but on CD. The indices are not on
index cards, but in digital form, which allows you to do sorts, and print
out lists of names, complete with the E.D.s and census page numbers you need
to look up the record, in various forms. Very neat!

Of course, these records are only as good as the handwriting of the
enumerator. Some names will be missing or wrong if the folks who did the
indexing had trouble reading the original record. As a last resort, if you
know the address, you might want to hunt for the census page on microfilm
with the address you're looking for. The folk at the regional archives
office can certainly show you how to do this.

Robert Corwin

Researching KREMENETSKY/KENNER >from Kremenets/Odessa, and LITTMAN from
Proshnits.