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First Name: Kazimiera #general


Yaacov Slizak <yslizak@...>
 

Dear Friends,

Is the polish first name "Kazimiera" a typical Jewish one? I have never
heard of this one.

A Polish pal friend of mine is called SPOSOB - surname I am researching -
but his family (up to grandparents) have no knowledge of any Jewish
heritage.

His grandfather is called Roman and he's >from Radzyn Podlaski (Pol). His
grand-aunt is called Kazimiera and she's >from Ivano Frankivsk (Ukr).

Thanks,

Yaacov Slizak
Ennis, Co.Clare, Ireland

SPOSOB, SPOSYP, SPOSEEP - Kurytnycja, Lyuboml (Ukr), Chelm, Dubenka (Pol),
USA, Argentina
FARBER - Kiyev (Ukr), Argentina
KLEINER, KLEIN - Hrubieszow, Chrzanow, Sieniawa (Pol), UK
PLOJT, PLOIT - Vladimir Volynskiy, Ozdziutycze, Kovel, Ratno (Ukr),
Argentina
GURFINKEL - Hrubieszow (Pol) PELTZ - Dubenka (Pol), New York (USA)
SPATZ - NJ (USA), SCHNEER, KESSLER, VISNOWSKY - Argentina


L. <alethea@...>
 

Here is what I found.


Kazimiera f Polish - Feminine form of Kazimierz

Kazimierz m Polish - Polish form of Casimir

CASIMIR m English - to destroy greatness >from Slavic kazic "to
destroy" and meri "great, famous". Four kings of Poland have borne this
name, including Casimir III the Great, who greatly strengthened the
Polish state in the 14th century. The name also belonged to Saint
Casimir, a 15th-century Polish prince and a patron saint of Poland and
Lithuania.

Sincerely,

Lara Clark
Houston, Texas


>yslizak@... (Yaacov Slizak) opined:
>
>>Dear Friends,
>>
>>Is the polish first name "Kazimiera" a typical Jewish one? I have
never heard of this one.
>>
>>A Polish pal friend of mine is called SPOSOB - surname I am
researching - but his family (up to grandparents) have no knowledge of
any Jewish heritage.
>>
>
>>His grandfather is called Roman and he's >from Radzyn Podlaski (Pol).
His grand-aunt is called Kazimiera and she's >from Ivano Frankivsk (Ukr).


Stan Goodman <safeq@...>
 

yslizak@... (Yaacov Slizak) opined:

Dear Friends,

Is the polish first name "Kazimiera" a typical Jewish one? I have never
heard of this one.

A Polish pal friend of mine is called SPOSOB - surname I am researching -
but his family (up to grandparents) have no knowledge of any Jewish
heritage.
His grandfather is called Roman and he's >from Radzyn Podlaski (Pol). His
grand-aunt is called Kazimiera and she's >from Ivano Frankivsk (Ukr).
Both names are straight Polish names, and do not point at any Jewish
connection. Similarly, SPOSOB is an ordinary Slavic root, which means
"possibility", "opportunity", etc. Even though your friend's
grandfather is >from an area with a heavy Jewish population (the former
Lomza Gubernia is now part of the Podlaskie Wojewodzwo), he seems to
have been a Pole, not a Jew.


Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com
Although the given Reply address is a valid one, mail is retrieved
from it only infrequently. If you wish a more timely response >from
me, please visit my website (see the address just above), where you
will find my primary address. I regret any inconvenience.


Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Yaacov Slizak of Ireland posted as follows:

"Is the polish first name "Kazimiera" a typical Jewish one? I have never
heard of this one.

A Polish pal friend of mine is called SPOSOB - surname I am researching -
but his family (up to grandparents) have no knowledge of any Jewish
heritage.

His grandfather is called Roman and he's >from Radzyn Podlaski (Pol). His
grand-aunt is called Kazimiera and she's >from Ivano Frankivsk (Ukr)."

The Polish name Kazimiera for a female is one that I do not
recognize. There are several similar names for *males* which were used by
Jews in Poland and in some other Eastern European countries: Kazimir and
Kazimierz, plus a few variant spellings. It is possible that the name
Kazimiera was used for females in correspondence to these male names --
this practice was not uncommon both in secular Europe and within Jewish
usage as well. It was carried out by tacking on an extension to the male
name.

In any event, these names for men were recognized in Poland during the
nineteenth century by the rabbinate as "New" secular kinuim which could be
properly written in a Get (Jewish divorce contract). So, in this sense,
the name Kazimiera has a degree of validity for Jewish women, however, I
have not found any support for its authoritative use by Jews within the
confines of Jewish divorce law.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel