Pronunciation of Jetta? #general


Alexander Sharon
 

"Lisa Thompson" wrote in message


My g-g-g'father's sister was named Jetta according to her birth
certificate, but she is enumerated in the 1880 census as Ida. I was
wondering if possibly the census taker misunderstood Jetta as "Ida" or if
Ida was a "nickname" of sorts. I have no idea how Jetta is pronounced.

Thanks,
Lisa Thompson
Columbia MO
Lisa,

Jetta is pronounced as [yeh tah] and Ida is pronounced as [ee dah]

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Burt Goodman
 

Lisa;

My best guess would be "Yetta" - a pretty common name, which could easily
have been Americanized to "Ida"...


My g-g-g'father's sister was named Jetta according to her birth
certificate, but she is enumerated in the 1880 census as Ida. I was
wondering if possibly the census taker misunderstood Jetta as "Ida" or if
Ida was a "nickname" of sorts. I have no idea how Jetta is pronounced.>>


MBernet@...
 

<< My g-g-g'father's sister was named Jetta according to her birth
certificate, but she is enumerated in the 1880 census as Ida. I was
wondering if possibly the census taker misunderstood Jetta as "Ida" or if
Ida was a "nickname" of sorts. I have no idea how Jetta is pronounced. >>

Depends where. In most of Europe the J is pronounced like the Y in
English, so it would be Yetta. Yetta could, of course, chose to be called
any name she wished. Jetta was European, Ida much more "American."

Michael Bernet,
New York


Herb <herbiem@...>
 

The pronounced is Yetta. This is a common name for Jewish women. In
Hungary and other countries the J is pronounced as a Y. Many Yettas are
called Ethel in the U.S., but any name could be selected.including Ida.

--

Herb Meyers
Boulder, CO
herbiem@mindspring.com

My g-g-g'father's sister was named Jetta according to her birth
certificate, but she is enumerated in the 1880 census as Ida. I was
wondering if possibly the census taker misunderstood Jetta as "Ida" or
if Ida was a "nickname" of sorts. I have no idea how Jetta is pronounced.


Lisa Thompson <lisajt@...>
 

My g-g-g'father's sister was named Jetta according to her birth
certificate, but she is enumerated in the 1880 census as Ida. I was
wondering if possibly the census taker misunderstood Jetta as "Ida" or if
Ida was a "nickname" of sorts. I have no idea how Jetta is pronounced.

Thanks,
Lisa Thompson
Columbia MO


Lisa Thompson <lisajt@...>
 

Thank you very much for everyone's help! My g-g-g-g'father was Bohemian and
his wife was German, so it appears that they would have used the Yetta
pronunciation.

I kept thinking that name was familiar and it just clicked - my
g-g-g-g'mother's mother's name was Jette. She also had a sister named
Jette. As far as I know, neither Jette came to America, but perhaps they
referred to their child Jetta as Ida just to avoid confusion, anyway.

Lisa Thompson
Columbia, MO

Depends where. In most of Europe the J is pronounced like the Y in
English, so it would be Yetta. Yetta could, of course, chose to be called
any name she wished. Jetta was European, Ida much more "American."

Michael Bernet,
New York>>


Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Lisa Thompson wrote:

My g-g-g'father's sister was named Jetta according to her birth
certificate, but she is enumerated in the 1880 census as Ida. I was
wondering if possibly the census taker misunderstood Jetta as "Ida" or if
Ida was a "nickname" of sorts. I have no idea how Jetta is pronounced.
The J would be pronounced as a Y.

I suspect census takers often tended to "Americanize" names, and with
even less care than would go into other types of record (after all, the
data is going to be secret, and nobody's actually going to _use_ it,
so what do I care if the census has my name wrong?). I recently found
a relative listed in the 1906 special Canadian census as "Henry", though
everywhere else AFAIK he is "Hirsch".

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Alexander Sharon
 

<MBernet@aol.com> wrote

<< My g-g-g'father's sister was named Jetta according to her birth
certificate, but she is enumerated in the 1880 census as Ida. I was
wondering if possibly the census taker misunderstood Jetta as "Ida" or
if Ida was a "nickname" of sorts. I have no idea how Jetta is
pronounced. >>

Depends where. In most of Europe the J is pronounced like the Y in
English, so it would be Yetta. Yetta could, of course, chose to be
called any name she wished. Jetta was European, Ida much more "American."

Michael Bernet,
New York
Ida is an abbreviation of Idalia. A very common Jewish name in past Eastern
Europe. My Mom in law z'l was Idalia (Ida) a feminine version of Judah
(Yudl, Yiddele)

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Haakon Chevalier <haakon.chevalierAntiSpam.1994@...>
 

Hi, Lisa.

I don't really have anything to add, except that you might find it
interesting to hear some similar names >from a similar background.

I have a couple of people named Jetty in my family, which I suspect is a
variation of the same name. One was Bohemian, and also called Jenny here;
the other was a second generation Bavarian-American born in Colorado, who
perhaps was also known as Henrietta, although this is not yet certain.

Haakon Chevalier

Lisa Thompson wrote:

Thank you very much for everyone's help! My g-g-g-g'father was Bohemian
and his wife was German, so it appears that they would have used the Yetta
pronunciation.

I kept thinking that name was familiar and it just clicked - my
g-g-g-g'mother's mother's name was Jette. She also had a sister named
Jette. As far as I know, neither Jette came to America, but perhaps they
referred to their child Jetta as Ida just to avoid confusion, anyway.
--
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