Town Name/Sneezes #general


Dov & Varda <yknow@...>
 

Ros Romem wrote:>A friend/distant
family remembers the name of his mother's shtetl/town as "sounds like a
lot of sneezes" .... seriously. It could be anything but as it may help me
find my own family I am curious to have your suggestions.>

I think you would have to know what onomatopoeia your family associates
with a sneeze. In American English, a sneeze, is 'Achoo', but in Hebrew,
for instance, a sneeze is "Haptchoo (with a hard H)". I assume that other
dialects have their own interpretation of the sound of a sneeze!

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel
(Gezundheit!)


David Rothman <drothman1@...>
 

How about Rzezhow?

Ros Romem wrote:>A friend/distant
family remembers the name of his mother's shtetl/town as
"sounds like a lot of sneezes" .... seriously. It could be anything but
as it may help me find my own family I am curious to have your
suggestions. >

snip < ---

Dave,
David Rothman
Hawthorne, CA


Ken and Deborah Baseman <dbaseman@...>
 

One possiblity of s town name that sounded like a lot of sneezes is
Sochaczew, Poland. The yiddish-speaking elders in my family pronounced it
as SOCH-err-chofff. Good luck on your research and G-d bless.

Deborah Baseman
New Hampshire


MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 8/5/2003 7:38:02 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
yknow@... writes:

<< Ros Romem wrote:
A friend/distant family remembers the name of his mother's shtetl/town
as "sounds like a lot of sneezes" .... seriously. It could be anything
but as it may help me find my own family I am curious to have your
suggestions.>

I think you would have to know what onomatopoeia your family associates
with a sneeze. In American English, a sneeze, is 'Achoo', but in Hebrew,
for instance, a sneeze is "Haptchoo (with a hard H)". I assume that other
dialects have their own interpretation of the sound of a sneeze! >>

==I agree. In some countries people would probably sneeze Chechen (in the
Caucasus), others Szczecin (named Stettin under German rule). Polish has
enough s, z and c's to make many towns and villages sound like a sneeze,
just as Germany has enough ch and ck's to sound like a cough.

But the basic question is nothing to sneeze at. Perhaps someone will
cough up a solution.

Michael Bernet, New York


Haz an Jo <hazanjo@...>
 

In a message dated 8/5/2003 7:38:02 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
yknow@... writes:

<< Ros Romem wrote:
A friend/distant family remembers the name of his mother's shtetl/town
as "sounds like a lot of sneezes" .... seriously. It could be anything
but as it may help me find my own family I am curious to have your
suggestions.>

I think you would have to know what onomatopoeia your family associates
with a sneeze. In American English, a sneeze, is 'Achoo', but in Hebrew,
for instance, a sneeze is "Haptchoo (with a hard H)". I assume that
other dialects have their own interpretation of the sound of a sneeze! >>

==I agree. In some countries people would probably sneeze Chechen (in
the Caucasus), others Szczecin (named Stettin under German rule). Polish
has enough s, z and c's to make many towns and villages sound like a
sneeze, just as Germany has enough ch and ck's to sound like a cough.

But the basic question is nothing to sneeze at. Perhaps someone will
cough up a solution.

Michael Bernet, New York
I'm in the dark about towns which sound like a sneeze, but I do have a
suggestion. I have one branch of my family (STARK) about which I'm
unlikely to retrieve info >from living family members. Since I have no idea
from whence my Grandmother came, I went through all the name lists on the
JRI Poland website. I felt that this was at least a way of narrowing down
the possibilities.

Hazel Sandow Boon
Researching:
HABER (Dzhurov, Ukraine; New York); STARK (probably Ukraine; New York);
SADOWSKY/SADOWSKI (Lodz, Poland; New York); KANET(Czyewo,Lomza Gubernia;
NY); BOON, NASH, NEWCOMBE, KERSHAW (Sussex, Surrey, Leicester, Cumberland)
England, Hamilton, Canada


Paul Silverstone
 

My aunt wrote about her father - concerning his name "one had to cough
to say it, so he took my mother's name."

I wasted a lot of time looking up the wrong name. The name he took was
Silverstein - his own name I now know is spelled Chrzan. I have found
this name spelled three different ways in Hebrew.

Paul Silverstone

--
Paul Silverstone
New York

please reply to paulh@...


ROBERT WEISS
 

In a message dated 8/7/03 8:29:34 AM, Hazel Boon writes:

<< I'm in the dark about towns which sound like a sneeze, but I do have a
suggestion. I have one branch of my family (STARK) about which I'm
unlikely to retrieve info >from living family members. Since I have no idea
from whence my Grandmother came, I went through all the name lists on the
JRI Poland website. I felt that this was at least a way of narrowing down
the possibilities.>>

If the name is not too common, then Beider's books "A Dictionary of Jewish
Surnames >from the Russian Empire" and "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames
from the Kingdom of poland" can place the name in a particular region in
East Europe. Look up the name and see if it was "commonly found" in a
particular town or region. That can limit your search considerably.

Bob Weiss in Northridge, CA
RWeissJGS@...


J&B Davis <bdavis@...>
 

I would like to suggest the birth and marriage place near Radom in Poland
of my son-in-law's maternal grandfather (who was named Avram Moshe
MENCZYK): Pszysucha, which we pronounce as P-sis-a-cha.

Beverley Davis in Melbourne, Australia