Naming and the intention of the namer #general


Jerome Seligsohn <jselig1315@...>
 

We must not presume that the parents in selcting a
name for their child are students of the origin of
names. We can only surmise that they intend to give a
name for a purpose that must remain somewhat of a
mystery to posterity. We assume that some ancestor is
being honored especially if the name designators are
avowedly concerned with tradition. If the designators
are of the orthodox persuasion we can assume that they
must meet the dictates of their community and are
fairly close to the historic name. For the rest we
must conjecture that anything is permitted, even Jezebel.
Genealogically speaking we are in a minefield.

Jerome Seligsohn
NYC


Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Although the naming thread has been pretty much worked out, I have a cute
story which is relevant to what Jerome wrote about our modern generation of
parents. At the bat mitsva of a girl named Jessica, I congratulated her
parents and remarked that they had given their daughter a beautiful Hebrew
name. I was met with incomprehension. Jessica a Hebrew name?
Ida

Dr. Joseph M. Schwarcz
Dr. Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Jerome Seligsohn [mailto:jselig1315@yahoo.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2004 9:34 PM
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Subject: Naming and the intention of the namer

We must not presume that the parents in selcting a
name for their child are students of the origin of
names. We can only surmise that they intend to give a
name for a purpose that must remain somewhat of a
mystery to posterity. We assume that some ancestor is
being honored especially if the name designators are
avowedly concerned with tradition. If the designators
are of the orthodox persuasion we can assume that they
must meet the dictates of their community and are
fairly close to the historic name. For the rest we
must conjecture that anything is permitted, even Jezebel.
Genealogically speaking we are in a minefield.

Jerome Seligsohn
NYC