"Yankel" - three questions #general


Dale Bricker <dbricker@...>
 

My great-grandfather was processed through Ellis Island with his
three older siblings in 1893. His eldest brother was identified
as "Yankel".

1) Was "Yankel" a proper first name, or was it a nickname?

2) On my great grandfather's death certificate in 1902, his
place of origin was identified as Romania. The ship's
list that the four siblings' names was found on identified
their origin as Russia. Was "Yankel" a name that would
have been used in Romania?

3) Does anyone have any ideas as to what would have been
the most likely anglicization of the name "Yankel" after
arrival in America? For example, I had a grandfather
>from Ukraine, born Yacov, who was known as "Jack" once
he'd arrived in the States.

Thanks very much.

Dale Bricker

MODERATOR NOTE:
Extensive discussion of the correlation between names in English (or other
languages), Yiddish, and Hebrew has appeared in the JewishGen Discussion
Group over the years. Unfortunately, there is no absolute correlation,
although some correspondences are more common than others.

You may check the following resources on the JewishGen website
< http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html#Names >
< http://www.jewishgen.org/mentprog/namfaq0.htm >
< http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/GivenNames/ >.

You can also check the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop>,


MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/24/2004 12:18:37 AM Eastern Standard Time,
dbricker@cyburban.com writes:
1) Was "Yankel" a proper first name, or was it a nickname?
==Yankel is a popular diminutive for Ya`akov/Jacob

2) On my great grandfather's death certificate in 1902, his
place of origin was identified as Romania. The ship's
list that the four siblings' names was found on identified
their origin as Russia.
==Border changes in Europe are common, even today. Parts of Romania,
e.g.Bessarabia, Bukovina, Transdinestria have been part
of Russia a numbger of times.

Was "Yankel" a name that would have been used in Romania?
==It's a Yiddish name. The mjority iof Jews in Romania
spoke Yiddish.

3) Does anyone have any ideas as to what would have been
the most likely anglicization of the name "Yankel" after
arrival in America?
==Since Yankel is a form of Jacob, the likelihood is that he
might have chosen a variant of that name in the USA: Jacob,
Jack, Jake or James.

Michael Bernet, New York


Alexander Sharon
 

"Dale Bricker" wrote

My great-grandfather was processed through Ellis Island with his
three older siblings in 1893. His eldest brother was identified
as "Yankel".

1) Was "Yankel" a proper first name, or was it a nickname?
Yankel (Yankiel, Jankiel) became a first name in Russian Empire
This is associated with the Russian administration rules which did
not allow Jewish people to use Christians saints name.
Thus Yakov (Jakub) has been transformed to Yankiel, Moses (Moisiey) to
ugly Movsha, Joseph (Iosif, Jozef) to Osip, Isaac (Isaak) to Itsik,
Israel to Srul, Salomon to Shloyme (Szlojme).

Forbidden also were our ancient names David, Jonathan, Mattityahu
(Matvey) and so on.

3) Does anyone have any ideas as to what would have been
the most likely anglicization of the name "Yankel" after
arrival in America? For example, I had a grandfather
from Ukraine, born Yacov, who was known as "Jack" once
he'd arrived in the States.
Could be anything. No one was obliged to pick a certain prescribed name,
but people usually have kept their first name first letter as the link
to the past. Yakov (or Jakov) is associated this way with Jack.
I have noticed similar practice amongst the Chinese people that
have been adopting Chrfistian names.


Thanks very much.

Dale Bricker
Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab


Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <40b0a1e1$0$98719$45beb828@newscene.com>,
Dale Bricker <dbricker@cyburban.com> wrote:

My great-grandfather was processed through Ellis Island with his
three older siblings in 1893. His eldest brother was identified
as "Yankel".
1) Was "Yankel" a proper first name, or was it a nickname?
It's a Yiddish diminutive of the Hebrew name Yaakov.

2) On my great grandfather's death certificate in 1902, his
place of origin was identified as Romania. The ship's
list that the four siblings' names was found on identified
their origin as Russia. Was "Yankel" a name that would
have been used in Romania?
Yes.

3) Does anyone have any ideas as to what would have been
the most likely anglicization of the name "Yankel" after
arrival in America? For example, I had a grandfather
>from Ukraine, born Yacov, who was known as "Jack" once
he'd arrived in the States.
I think Jack is the most likely for Yankel as well, although
almost anything is possible.

Robert Israel
israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z2


Julia Koszewska <julia_koszewska@...>
 

Yankel is a proper name. as I know it is also used in Romania.
As I know the anglicization of this name could be: Yankie.
but maybe also Ian. I'm not sure. I've heard that this name
Yankel in "christian version" was used sometimes as Jan and
especially its short form: Janek.
Best regards- J.

Subject: "Yankel" - three questions
From: Dale Bricker <dbricker@cyburban.com>
Date: 23 May 2004 08:09:11 -0500
X-Message-Number: 34

My great-grandfather was processed through Ellis Island with
his
three older siblings in 1893. His eldest brother was
identified
as "Yankel".
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