No Death Certificate - Pennsylvania #general


GSEaston@...
 

The Pennsylvania Department of Health told me that there is no record of my
great-grandmother's death certificate (even though i know her date of death -
1-22-1913).

Any other suggestions?

Glenn Easton


Jay Cohen
 

The Pennsylvania Department of Health told me that there is no record of my
great-grandmother's death certificate (even though i know her date of death -
1-22-1913).

Any other suggestions?
One possibility (turned out to the case in my family) is that your
great-grandmother actually died in a different state. In my case, my
great-grandmother lived and was buried in Erie PA but actually died in a hospital
in Buffalo NY. When I tried to get her death record form the state of PA, I was
simply told that none existed. This confused me to no end until I heard the
family story of her death in Buffalo.

Hope that helps.

Jay Cohen <jlcohen@myadvocate.com>
(Washington DC Metro Area)
Searching: BRAUN, DOLOWICZ, FLATAU & KAC, (Grajewo, Lomza, Rajgrod, Suwalki),
KAGAN (Bialystok, Piaski, Volkovysk, Warsawa),
MANDELBAUM (Bialystok),
YERSZKI, YEZERSKY (Piaski, Volkovysk),
LOSHAK (Pogrebishche) and
KUSHNIRSKIY (Pliskov)


Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Pa. Civil Registration started late, and perhaps she did not have a death
certificate. However,. it is also possible that you have the wrong date, or that
she died with a different name, or that she died some other place than what you
thought.

If you have an obit, you can probably be fairly certain of the approximate date-
and only the year is needed for a search.

If you know where she is buried, you might be able to confirm or confound the
information handed down with the information that the cemetery has-indeed, if she
died 'out of town' the city or town hall where she was buried should have some
'burial certificate' or similar paperwork. She might have gone to visit a friend
or relative in NJ, NY, or elsewhere for dinner and died there. If she died in NY,
for example, her death certificate would be there-even if she was living in PA and
was buried in PA.

If her name was common (Fanny Cohen, for example) then the clerk might get
confused and say there was no certificate found when he/she could not figure out
the right one.

Of course, we all know the stories about someone having any sort of record in
another name. Beth becomes Lizzy, Schwartz becomes Shwats/Swart/Black,
Packelnishky becomes Packard or Levi in different parts of the family-and she
could be buried under any of the names that the family might have been considering
at the time. And what is obvious to you is not to a clerk. So go to PA or the
FHL near you and do the search yourself-nobody else will do as good a job because
nobody else will know her information and family as well.

Sally Bruckheimer
Harrison, NY