An apparently German abbreviation #general


Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

I have found in the AGAD indices a possible relative whose name is given as
"Isak Ismach r. SPRITZER", born in the 1870s. (There are also other names,
male and female, given in the same form.) I have not seen the full record,
but >from spellings of other names in the index, it appears that the records
are in German, rather than Polish. I have no background in German, so I
can't guess what the "r." abbreviation may represent. Can anyone help?

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
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there.


Mark Halpern
 

The "r" in these cases is an abbreviation for the Latin "Recte,"
which means correctly. >from this information, we cannot determine
whether the actual record was written in Polish or German, the
two languages used by Jewish vital record registrars in 19th
Century Galicia.

In your case, ISMACH r. SPRITZER means that Isak may use ISMACH
as his surname, but correctly should use SPRITZER. This situation
is usually the result of the parents of Isak not having
registered a Civil marriage. In this case, the Austrian
authorities consider Isak's birth to be illegitimate and "assign"
the mother's surname to the child. If Isak "wrongly" uses the
father's surname, this may be corrected in the record of the
birth of Isak's children.

Jewish vital records registrars in Galicia applied the laws and
regulations on illegitimacy inconsistently, so more research is
required to confirm the assumption that Isak's father's surname
was ISMACH and his mother's surname was SPRITZER.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland AGAD Archive Coordinator

----- Original Message -----
I have found in the AGAD indices a possible relative whose name
is given as "Isak Ismach r. SPRITZER", born in the 1870s. (There are also
other names, male and female, given in the same form.) I have not seen the
full record, but >from spellings of other names in the index, it appears that
the records are in German, rather than Polish. I have no background in
German, so I can't guess what the "r." abbreviation may represent. Can
anyone help?

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel


Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 18:27:54 UTC, Mark@Halpern.com (Mark Halpern) opined:

Thank you for your explanation.

The "r" in these cases is an abbreviation for the Latin "Recte,"
which means correctly. >from this information, we cannot determine
whether the actual record was written in Polish or German, the
two languages used by Jewish vital record registrars in 19th
Century Galicia.
As I said (see below), most of the names in the index are spelled in the
German manner; for example, one sees many more "Sch-"s than the equivalent
Polish "Sz". When I receive the full records I am ordering, I expect to see
German, not Polish.

In your case, ISMACH r. SPRITZER means that Isak may use ISMACH
as his surname, but correctly should use SPRITZER. This situation
is usually the result of the parents of Isak not having
registered a Civil marriage. In this case, the Austrian
authorities consider Isak's birth to be illegitimate and "assign"
the mother's surname to the child. If Isak "wrongly" uses the
father's surname, this may be corrected in the record of the
birth of Isak's children.
I understand this to mean that, should Isak dare to call himself ISMACH, his
children will nevertheless be registered as SPRITZER -- a brilliant example
of 19th-century Germanic narrowmindedness, not to mention a potentially
perfect defense against Galician genealogists. Those of us who are
interested in Congress Poland are fortunate that Polish registrars, despite
often execrable handwriting, were less formidable obstacles.

Jewish vital records registrars in Galicia applied the laws and
regulations on illegitimacy inconsistently, so more research is
required to confirm the assumption that Isak's father's surname
was ISMACH and his mother's surname was SPRITZER.
Isak's birth registration would answer the question unambiguously.

There is also inconsistency of another kind: I find many index entries in
which the child born is simply listed with his mother's maiden name, without
the "<father's surname> r. <mother's surname>" convention.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland AGAD Archive Coordinator

----- Original Message -----
I have found in the AGAD indices a possible relative whose name
is given as "Isak Ismach r. SPRITZER", born in the 1870s. (There are also
other names, male and female, given in the same form.) I have not seen the
full record, but >from spellings of other names in the index, it appears that
the records are in German, rather than Polish. I have no background in
German, so I can't guess what the "r." abbreviation may represent. Can
anyone help?
--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com
For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Mark Halpern
 

The "r" in these cases is an abbreviation for the Latin "Recte,"
which means correctly. >from this information, we cannot determine
whether the actual record was written in Polish or German, the
two languages used by Jewish vital record registrars in 19th
Century Galicia.
As I said (see below), most of the names in the index are spelled in the
German manner; for example, one sees many more "Sch-"s than the equivalent
Polish "Sz". When I receive the full records I am ordering, I expect to see
German, not Polish.
The spelling of the surname will be in the German manner as the
Austrian authorities in 1797 required Galician Jews to take
German surnames. The records could be in either Polish or German
as both languages were allowed to be used for Jewish vital
records. Apparently the choice was up to the local Jewish
community or the registrar.

Jewish vital records registrars in Galicia applied the laws and
regulations on illegitimacy inconsistently, so more research is
required to confirm the assumption that Isak's father's surname
was ISMACH and his mother's surname was SPRITZER.
Isak's birth registration would answer the question unambiguously.

There is also inconsistency of another kind: I find many index entries in
which the child born is simply listed with his mother's maiden name, without
the "<father's surname> r. <mother's surname>" convention.
Yes, there are many inconsistencies in the recording of birth
records in Galicia. For illegitimate births, I have found all of
these recordings.

1. Child's surname not recorded, but the father and the mother
are recorded as if the birth was legitimate.
2. Child's surname not recorded with only mother's name recorded.
3. Child's surname not recorded. Mother's name is recorded.
Father signs statement of paternity in remarks column.
4. Child's surname is father's surname.
5. Child's surname is mother's surname.

The use of father r. mother convention (or "v" or "f", where v is
vel or also known as and f is false) is not used in most Galician
records, but there are exceptions. Many records for Lwow from
1877 and later do use these conventions.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland AGAD Archive Coordinator